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   Home   Help Search  
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Author Topic: First Radio  (Read 5718 times)
KN4LGK
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Posts: 7




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« on: June 03, 2018, 05:56:37 AM »

Starting to think beyond the handheld to my first radio. I seem to read a lot of good things about the IC 7300. Any thoughts or comments about this being a choice for a new hams first radio?

Thanks,
Glen
KN4LGK
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W5CPT
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Posts: 817




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« Reply #1 on: June 03, 2018, 07:56:57 AM »

The IC-7300 is not a radio that you will out-grow anytime soon. The learning curve may be a bit steep, but if you keep the manual handy you should be OK.
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K6BRN
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Posts: leet




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« Reply #2 on: June 03, 2018, 04:35:18 PM »

Glen:

The Icom IC-7300 is a good radio to start with and will become much more useful once you've upgraded from Tech to General and can use 20M and 40M, two of the most active daytime (20M) and evening (40M) HF bands.  It is user friendly and works well in digital modes like FT8 (VERY popular right now), SSB (voice) and CW.

I recommend it even though I do not have one (I am largely Yaesu/Kenwood based) - but I've used a few and a number of my friends have and use them.  So... go for it.

But also get that license upgrade and think about the type and placement of an HF antenna.  Getting the radio is easy - just a matter of money.  But the antenna choice and installation takes some serious thought.  Consider joining a nearby ham club and asking an "Elmer" to come out and look over your potential "shack" and antenna space for suggestions.

Best Regards.

Brian - K6BRN
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N8FVJ
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Posts: 900




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« Reply #3 on: June 04, 2018, 08:02:04 AM »

Highly recommend the IC-7300
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N6MST
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Posts: 2




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« Reply #4 on: June 04, 2018, 08:09:18 AM »

I just got my 7300 up and running two days ago. I have not even cracked the manual open and am already making contacts and loving how easy this radio is to operate. I thought I would not like the touch screen very much, I was wrong. The scope is awesome, the filtering is intuitive, etc. I agree with W5CPT and doubt I will outgrow this radio anytime soon.
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K4FMH
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Posts: 523




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« Reply #5 on: June 05, 2018, 01:27:10 PM »

My advice on a first HF radio? Keep in mind: it won't be your last.
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KG4NEL
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Posts: 541




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« Reply #6 on: June 05, 2018, 04:13:14 PM »

My advice on a first HF radio? Keep in mind: it won't be your last.

There was a period I went through about five in five years, but I've more or less been monogamous now.
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KN4LGK
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Posts: 7




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« Reply #7 on: June 17, 2018, 12:46:24 PM »

Thanks everyone for the advice. I’m taking my General exam next Sunday and then I’ll drive over to HRO and take a look at one.
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SOFAR
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Posts: 1489




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« Reply #8 on: June 17, 2018, 12:57:33 PM »

Starting to think beyond the handheld to my first radio. I seem to read a lot of good things about the IC 7300. Any thoughts or comments about this being a choice for a new hams first radio?

Thanks,
Glen
KN4LGK

How do you know HF will be your preferred mode? Some operators get into VHF/UHF SSB, weak signal work.

Some of these modes have a novelty factor that wears thin after awhile. Probably explains contesting, something to aim for, 'goals' etc.
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N8FVJ
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Posts: 900




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« Reply #9 on: June 17, 2018, 01:01:51 PM »

Yaesu FT9991A is 160m thru 70cm all mode if you want VUF/UHF.
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K6BRN
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Posts: leet




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« Reply #10 on: June 17, 2018, 07:56:22 PM »

Ummmm...  you mean...   Yaesu FT-991A with 10-160M coverage, plus 6M, plus 2M, plus 70cm?  (HF + VHF + UHF).
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NM0O
Member

Posts: 11




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« Reply #11 on: June 20, 2018, 09:10:53 AM »

I have bought one new radio in 40 years: Yaesu FT-101F. I used that very nice radio for about 9 years, then had a long period when I didn't have access to my own HF rig. I noticed that the TV program "Jericho" included scenes where the FT-101F was in use. <g>

In 2016, I won the IC-7300 at Peoria's Superfest. It doesn't weigh much, is easy to use, looks good on the counter, and does everything I need it to do. This little radio is amazing, and I have no plans to replace it.

Whatever radio you decide to acquire, since it's yours you will decide how you intend to use it, and that means coaxial cable and antennas. The antennas--no matter what kind you build or buy--are the life of your signal. Get the right ones, and the whole world will hear you when you speak. Of course, make sure that your transmission cables are the best you can afford. A signal that doesn't make it to the antenna won't be properly heard.

Good luck!
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WB8LBZ
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Posts: 167




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« Reply #12 on: June 21, 2018, 05:46:28 AM »

Hi Glen,  I depends on your interests and if you have a brand preference. Maybe a shack in a box will do. All in one units cover all bands and modes may do it for you. My multipurpose unit has changed from Icom 706MK2G, to 7000 to 9100 to 7100. This is over 20 years in time, your likes and dislikes will change. I'm moving into SDRs and soon the 7100 will find a new home. Good luck,

73, Larry  WB8LBZ
El Paso, TX
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PD2R
Member

Posts: 154




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« Reply #13 on: July 17, 2018, 12:28:29 AM »

I may be a bit late to the party but my advice would be to invest in antennas and perhaps a tower. I have got the same advice once but really didn't listen to it. I made up plenty of excuses to buy a nice rig instead of a decent antenna system. Sure you can build a simple dipole and make tons of QSO's. But a yagi will be a huge improvement over a dipole. If you want to work multiple bands, you probably going to need multiple antennas. And since there are no magical hooks in the sky, you are probably going to need some kind of tower system. Raising your antenna system 15 feet higher will also be a huge improvement.
Long story short, I'd much rather have a used FT857 and a mediocre rig then a brand spanking new IC 7851 and a low hanging dipole.

All that being said, the IC 7300 is a wonderful rig. I sold my K3 after enjoying it for almost 10 years and bought a almost new IC 7300. With the spare change I was supposed to buy a Optibeam OB6-3m. But then the washing machine and the family car broke down. By by Optibeam. I will get that beam... some day.
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KX2T
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Posts: 1101




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« Reply #14 on: July 17, 2018, 07:39:29 AM »

Glen, in most cases a 7300 may seen a little spartan on its control layout but once you sit in front of it and realize its simple but excellent UI(user interface) you will pick up the multi use controls fast plus there is a whole lot more you can do with that wonderful display. The receiver section is excellent and for the current price its a show stopper plus the transmit side is nice and clean with excellent audio achieved without lots of futzing and pains.
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