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   Home   Help Search  
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Author Topic: Raspberry PI  (Read 2416 times)
KA4NMA
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Posts: 547




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« on: June 06, 2018, 05:34:38 PM »

I would like to setup a headless Raspberry Pi
Digital.  What is the easiest way to connecrt an ipad mini? Hdmi/lighten  Adaptors. S signalink USB? ,Does anybody have an extra pi that I can get?
Randy ka4nma
« Last Edit: June 06, 2018, 05:43:20 PM by KA4NMA » Logged
KA4NMA
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Posts: 547




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« Reply #1 on: June 07, 2018, 03:54:13 PM »

Im asking basic questions.
Randy ka4nma
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NA4IT
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« Reply #2 on: June 09, 2018, 04:11:23 AM »

Here's a couple of links for you...

https://lifehacker.com/control-the-raspberry-pi-from-your-ipad-1508157846

https://lifehacker.com/control-the-raspberry-pi-from-your-ipad-1508157846
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KC0MYW
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Posts: 57




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« Reply #3 on: June 09, 2018, 08:28:41 PM »

Unless you're looking for a handout, the easiest way to get a Pi would be to order one from Amazon: https://amzn.to/2JvU4KE or another vendor. At $35 they aren't terribly expensive, and the last time I bought an enclosure for one, I got it from eBay for $1.00 and free shipping.

Regarding connecting it to your iPad mini, as far as I am aware, the HDMI port on the iPad is output only. I am not aware of any laptop or tablet that allows the screen to be used as a monitor for a different device.

The links that NA4IT gave you will work well for remotely accessing the Pi and seem to have a link to instructions for setting it up remotely as well. If you need, I have instructions somewhere for doing the initial setup via SSH from a laptop or other computer. You can also Google for those. The easiest way for a beginner to do the initial setup would be to connect it directly to a monitor or TV and keyboard and mouse and get everything configured and ready. Then, you can run it headless and access it remotely using remote desktop protocols or other methods with your iPad.

What digital modes/methods are you wanting to use it for and what radio are you planning to interface it with?
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G4AON
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« Reply #4 on: June 19, 2018, 10:48:05 AM »

The easiest way is via VNC on a local WiFi. I've used a local WiFi "hotspot" on an iPhone and the app "VNC Viewer" to control one of my Raspberry Pi's. The same app is available on an iPad.

73 Dave
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VA6PTA
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« Reply #5 on: June 19, 2018, 12:39:06 PM »

You can also make the raspberry pi as a wifi hotspot and vnc in from your iPad or other wifi enabled device. The iPad becomes keyboard mouse and screen.
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WO7R
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« Reply #6 on: July 07, 2018, 05:37:32 PM »

If you want to run a Raspberry Pi "headless" from the get-go, you have to run it from the command line for a bit.  You also should have wired internet, because wireless doesn't quite default due to passwords, etc.

The key?  In the "boot" partition, simply add a file called "ssh" (all lower case, no suffix).  The contents are irrelevant.

This will allow you to do even your initial boot of the Pi headless. 

The Pi should boot up and run DHCP and get some kind of address on your network.  You will have to find this (your router's tables should have it one way or another).

Once you have that, download the popular PuTTY program (or some other one you like) and use it to connect to the Pi using the "ssh" protocol.  Put in the user ID of "Pi" and the default password.

You are then "good to go" as far as configuring wireless, VNC, whatever else you need to set up from the command line.

If you are really savvy, you can configure your router to allow the Pi to use DHCP and yet have it assign the same IP address every time.  Many routers support such a function nowadays.  You have to extract your Pi''s "MAC" address to do this.  That's the best of both worlds -- the convenience of DHCP and the predictability of a fixed address.  You can extract the separate MAC for your wireless and assign that a different address, so you can connect to whatever interface is active.
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