Call Search
     

New to Ham Radio?
My Profile

Community
Articles
Forums
News
Reviews
Friends Remembered
Strays
Survey Question

Operating
Contesting
DX Cluster Spots
Propagation

Resources
Calendar
Classifieds
Ham Exams
Ham Links
List Archives
News Articles
Product Reviews
QSL Managers

Site Info
eHam Help (FAQ)
Support the site
The eHam Team
Advertising Info
Vision Statement
About eHam.net

donate to eham
   Home   Help Search  
Pages: [1]   Go Down
  Print  
Author Topic: Old tube radio 1930's  (Read 2717 times)
WA2ELZ
Member

Posts: 24




Ignore
« on: June 24, 2018, 03:55:17 PM »

Hello,
I have an old tube radio from the 30's. The radio is in  original condition; original capacitors, resistors. My question:
The radio does work now, Will the radio be devalued if I try and replace the electrolytic  capacitors. The first thing I see when doing a restore is to replace the capacitors; but no discussion about the value.
Suggestions welcome.
Logged
KAPT4560
Member

Posts: 554




Ignore
« Reply #1 on: June 24, 2018, 04:27:10 PM »

 What make and model? What are similar condition ones going for on the internet sales?
Personally. I like to restore original radios to my liking. Too many times I have had to undo the previous owners work and redo it.
 Operating a radio with original caps could cause damage. I would avoid it until it is evaluated. Or sell it as 'original, unrestored'.
Logged
AA4PB
Member

Posts: 15047




Ignore
« Reply #2 on: June 24, 2018, 05:21:14 PM »

Are the original electrolytics in cans? Modern electrolytics are usually smaller and I've been able to open up the cans and wire new electrolytics inside, thus keeping the original look. Antique Radio Supply is a good source for original looking capacitors, tubes, transformers, speaker grill cloth, etc.

Logged

Bob  AA4PB
Garrisonville, VA
N0TLD
Member

Posts: 6




Ignore
« Reply #3 on: June 25, 2018, 03:36:53 AM »

I've been collecting, restoring and selling antigue and vintage radios for a long time, like many others here, and I think it would be best to leave it original and unrestored until you have had it evaluated (as KAPT4560 wrote).

It would be helpful to know the brand and model, too.

I have seen that a gently restored radio gleans about as much value (or usually only a little less) as its unrestored version, unless it's a  particularly sought-after and rare model, in which case it is probably best to leave it be to retain its value. Generally, a subtly restored radio, where most of the restoration is inside, not cosmetic, will have about the same value as the unrestored version. Too much cosmetic restoration will indeed bring down value as collectors desire original woods, veneers, finishes.

But if you only deal with the electrolytic caps, and the model is not a rare particularly desired radio, you can make a working radio more valuable to a collector. I've experienced that many, many times, especially when I could remove and hollow out the original caps and insert the new caps inside them, wax them up and keep them looking like the original. NOT as a cheat, by the way -- I have never been dishonest about that technique with any buyer or collector; they always know if they're getting a restored model.

For many of them, restoring just the caps and giving the whole thing a good wipe down (without ruining any finish or graphics) was the selling point. If the radio is otherwise common and low value, if it looks nicely original-ish and works, it will have greater value and will likely sell faster than a broken, dead one.

Mike
N0TLD
Logged
W1BR
Member

Posts: 4189




Ignore
« Reply #4 on: June 28, 2018, 06:17:10 PM »

All things vintage radio:

http://antiqueradios.com/forums/index.php
Logged
Pages: [1]   Go Up
  Print  
 
Jump to:  

Powered by MySQL Powered by PHP Powered by SMF 1.1.11 | SMF © 2006-2009, Simple Machines LLC Valid XHTML 1.0! Valid CSS!