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Author Topic: This is how I am doing testing of my boat anchors  (Read 1056 times)
N4MQ
Member

Posts: 353




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« on: October 04, 2018, 04:38:22 AM »

While testing my Invader 2000 exciter, there are many stages to check and verify,  and just as often I turn on and off the power supply.  For my safety, I have built a power switch on a 4" x 4" electrical box that is located on the front of my work bench.  It is used to control power when adding of removing a component - soldering, metering or getting a scope probe into a tight spot.  After working for a while, it is possible to forget to switch off the power which is a risk to you or the equipment, this lapse of attention is dangerous.

My switch box has a double pole switch for the power line, and I added a GFI receptacle with duplex power outlet.  Switching the rig off from the panel switch is not safe as many know and pulling the plug is a nuisance that many omit doing now and then cause they will be careful.....

Double line break switching insures the power line is off ( ground is not opened! ).  The GFI adds protection for faults and if you decide to fat finger something while power is on.  Having the unit plugged into the " BOX " makes it easy to KILL the power and saves wear and tear on the panel switch during testing.

For a few bucks your test bench is now much safer and convenient to use.  Your family will appreciate the benefits, and not the ones from an insurance company!

Enjoy W  Grin  Roll Eyes D Y


“When I die, I want to die like my grandfather who died peacefully in his sleep. Not screaming like all the passengers in his car.”
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N2EY
Member

Posts: 5096




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« Reply #1 on: October 05, 2018, 10:38:34 AM »

With all due respect:

Pull the plug. That way there is no doubt.

All it takes is a bump of the switch and.....ooops....

73 de jim, N2EY
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KD1I
Member

Posts: 468




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« Reply #2 on: October 06, 2018, 05:58:42 AM »

Respectfully, N2EY is correct; pull that plug.   Also, there is no reason to interrupt the neutral on a 120 VAC circuit. It does not improve safety.     
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N3DT
Member

Posts: 1793




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« Reply #3 on: October 06, 2018, 07:44:47 AM »

Ditto. I always pull the plug. Too simple.
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KB3MDT
Member

Posts: 271




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« Reply #4 on: October 11, 2018, 06:17:15 PM »

Hi,
   The first thing I do when restoring old equipment is to remove the power cord as it eliminates all temptation (and is usually non polarized, and cracked or crumbly).    I then clean everything, replace old electrolytic and paper capacitors, replace bad tubes, resistors out of spec etc.   Only when I'm ready for power up testing do I install a new grounded power cord (re-purposed PC Power cord) with chassis fuse.   Initial testing is with 25 watt, then 100 watt, then 200 watt bulb in series before I plug directly into full AC power.  I unplug the unit whenever I need to go back in and change something OR if I leave my workbench!    I keep one hand in the back pocket and wear rubber soled shoes when it's necessary to make adjustments with the power on.   Even with the above, I have gotten a few shocks from carelessness while attaching test leads, etc.   

73
Ken
KB3MDT   

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