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Author Topic: "The old days"  (Read 2647 times)
WW7KE
Member

Posts: 937




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« Reply #45 on: November 20, 2018, 08:28:44 PM »

    I’m really impressed by all the old school hams that still take the time to meet and listen to new hams. The guys that have been hams for 50+ years, and are willing to share that knowledge with us news guys. The hams that never touch a UHF/VHF radio, digital modes, or an SDR radio, but still take five minutes out of their day to listen to the blabbering excitement of a new clueless ham. The hams that are passionate about the hobby, but understand that new people can be overwhelmed with information overload.  The hams that make it a point to walk up to the new guy at the meeting and protect him from the “listen to how great I am” guy.
     The first ham I spoke to in the parking lot on field day asked me what I was looking for in the hobby.  He invited me to his shack and gave me a very basic explanation of the equipment. My CWops instructor invited me along with him to do my first SOTA activation next week.  Both of these guys have been hams for almost 40 years, and they’ve never once mentioned how great the hobby used to be.    
    
  The hams that realize that humans didn’t hit some mythical intelligence cap in the 1950’s.  The hams that take the time post really helpful knowledge on these forums.  The hams that are open minded to new technology, but also pass along a healthy skepticism.  These hams are the ones that I will choose to learn from, and pass that knowledge on to those that come after me.

Guys like the ones you met are what we need more of.  We used to call them "Elmers" back in the day.  I'd just ignore the curmudgeons on boards like this, and get to know the hams in your community -- join the local club if there is one.  I learned a lot from the old timers in my club when I first got licensed.  But we still had a few of the "Get off my lawn! types even then.  They were pretty much ignored.

Keep operating and learning, and before you know it, you'll be a grumpy old man like me. Grin
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He speaks fluent PSK31, in FT8...  One QSO with him earns you 5BDXCC...  His Wouff Hong has two Wouffs... Hiram Percy Maxim called HIM "The Old Man..."  He is... The Most Interesting Ham In The World!
K1FBI
Member

Posts: 210




Ignore
« Reply #46 on: November 20, 2018, 08:42:44 PM »

Quote
Perfect example of Old Fart Mentality.

From one of the most useless forum posters and serial trouble makers who was even permanently banned from QRZ. Gee the newest hams must really look up to you..... Grin
This is going to be the best you and your cheerleader can constantly come up with?
The only reason a bunch of us got thrown off the ZED is because the OLD FARTS in the clique couldn't handle getting called on their BS.
Also, guys like you could dish it out but would cry like little girls if somebody stood up to them.
NOW BACK TO AMATEUR RADIO.
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K3UIM
Member

Posts: 388




Ignore
« Reply #47 on: November 20, 2018, 09:53:42 PM »

    I’m really impressed by all the old school hams that still take the time to meet and listen to new hams. The guys that have been hams for 50+ years, and are willing to share that knowledge with us news guys. The hams that never touch a UHF/VHF radio, digital modes, or an SDR radio, but still take five minutes out of their day to listen to the blabbering excitement of a new clueless ham. The hams that are passionate about the hobby, but understand that new people can be overwhelmed with information overload.  The hams that make it a point to walk up to the new guy at the meeting and protect him from the “listen to how great I am” guy.
     The first ham I spoke to in the parking lot on field day asked me what I was looking for in the hobby.  He invited me to his shack and gave me a very basic explanation of the equipment. My CWops instructor invited me along with him to do my first SOTA activation next week.  Both of these guys have been hams for almost 40 years, and they’ve never once mentioned how great the hobby used to be.    
    
  The hams that realize that humans didn’t hit some mythical intelligence cap in the 1950’s.  The hams that take the time post really helpful knowledge on these forums.  The hams that are open minded to new technology, but also pass along a healthy skepticism.  These hams are the ones that I will choose to learn from, and pass that knowledge on to those that come after me.

Guys like the ones you met are what we need more of.  We used to call them "Elmers" back in the day.  I'd just ignore the curmudgeons on boards like this, and get to know the hams in your community -- join the local club if there is one.  I learned a lot from the old timers in my club when I first got licensed.  But we still had a few of the "Get off my lawn! types even then.  They were pretty much ignored.

Keep operating and learning, and before you know it, you'll be a grumpy old man like me. Grin
A hearty "Amen" from this corner of Pa. (And a just as hardy "Thank You!") I would guess that "in my day" I've given classes and Novice tests to probably 50 "students" with only 1 flunking. (Retested and passed with flying colors!!)
There's still hope!
Charlie, K3UIM
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Where you are: I was!
Where I am: You will be!
So be nice to us old fogies!!
WI8P
Member

Posts: 717




Ignore
« Reply #48 on: November 21, 2018, 03:43:48 AM »

Look no further than most of the threads longer than 3 pages on ham radio forums if you're wondering why the good old days are over.  Did I mention I got my extra before I learned CW, and I own a Baofang?Huh  I have met so many great helpful hams in person, but the forums are the most spiteful forums I have seen in all of my hobbies.  It doesn't matter what the initial topic is about it usually degrades into grammar correction, and shaming people for not learning code.   
Bravo!! Someone had the fortitude to speak the truth!
I have been an Amateur for only 20 years. My newcomer opinion is that the only thing killing this hobby is the old fart mentality.

I don't agree the old fart mentality is killing the hobby (and not because I am one), but it sure has gotten beat into the ground. Also, I'd like to say I agree with Peter DL8OV about missing the old surplus shops, not just radio equipment but army navy too. Some really great times were had wandering amidst the those isles! 

People nostalgic for the old days tend to forget the negative things that were around back then, but that's a topic for another thread.
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KB2CRK
Member

Posts: 154


WWW

Ignore
« Reply #49 on: November 21, 2018, 04:17:55 AM »

Look no further than most of the threads longer than 3 pages on ham radio forums if you're wondering why the good old days are over.  Did I mention I got my extra before I learned CW, and I own a Baofang?Huh  I have met so many great helpful hams in person, but the forums are the most spiteful forums I have seen in all of my hobbies.  It doesn't matter what the initial topic is about it usually degrades into grammar correction, and shaming people for not learning code.   
Bravo!! Someone had the fortitude to speak the truth!
I have been an Amateur for only 20 years. My newcomer opinion is that the only thing killing this hobby is the old fart mentality.




I don't agree the old fart mentality is killing the hobby (and not because I am one), but it sure has gotten beat into the ground. Also, I'd like to say I agree with Peter DL8OV about missing the old surplus shops, not just radio equipment but army navy too. Some really great times were had wandering amidst the those isles! 

People nostalgic for the old days tend to forget the negative things that were around back then, but that's a topic for another thread.




Honestly there is nothing killing the Hobby at this time. 3 years ago we hit a record number of valid licensees. Times change and so do modes and equipment. I got my Novice in 87 and took my tech/general written prior to the Novice enhancement that year. Yes I was a 5wpm grandfathered General when code was reduced for all classes. I have both solid state and tube rigs in my shack. I work a little DX and some VHF UHF FM. As for the blow hards that puff them selves up, well they are who they are, no reason to call them on BS because many others can see it for what it is and will ignore it. Young hams making mistakes, Well a calm helping hand is all it takes to fix that. It does not matter that the tests can be memorized or that it might or might not be easier to pass them. Putting them down for making mistakes is worse than them making them in the first place. Even You (any ham) has make some sort of error in the past even if it is just tripping in the snow while walking uphill both ways to the testing session. None of us is perfect and 40 years from now these will be the good old days everyone pines over.
Logged

some people are like slinky's. not really good for anything but still bring a smile to your face when you push them down a flight of stairs.
N2EY
Member

Posts: 5066




Ignore
« Reply #50 on: November 21, 2018, 07:20:50 AM »

I think you mean the old hams that worked hard for and earned their tickets vs new one that nearly get them mail order and continue to equate that to ones that really earned them. That dog will never hunt until all the real old school hams are gone. A Extra used to really stand for something and very few ham held them as they were hard to get. Not anymore. If it was this easy 49 years ago I would of started as a Extra in 1969 rather than a Novice.
Really? "Old hams that worked hard and earned their tickets vs new one that nearly get them mail order"?

"49 years ago"?

Let's take a look at the history......

The earliest Callbook where I could find an entry for you is Winter 1976. Page 502 - says you were a Conditional then. Conditional was a General "by mail".....no FCC examiner.

1978 Callbook, page 758, says the same. WB8WGC is you, isn't it?

Did you have an amateur radio license before the entry in the Winter, 1976 Callbook? If so, when? You claim "49 years ago" and mention 1969, and starting out as an Extra....but in 1969 there was a 2 year experience requirement, so nobody could start out as an Extra back then. That requirement went away in the early 1970s. Anyone who was a US ham back then knew about it....

FCC phased out the Conditional starting about 1975 by renewing them as General. No testing or anything, just a license class change. By 1980 all Conditionals were gone.

The code sending test went away in 1978.

In 1983 we got the VE system and published Q&A pools. Same exact system as today. Anybody who was licensed or upgraded after 1983-84 did so by the same system and essentially the same tests (upgraded over time) as today.

In 1990 we got medical waivers for the 13 and 20 wpm code tests. Anybody could get any class of license with just 5 wpm code and a doctor's note. FCC did not publish data on who got a license with a waiver and who didn't. Anyone who upgraded to General, Advanced or Extra after 1990 could have done so with a waiver and 5 wpm.

The 1991 Callbook, page 886, shows you as a General.
The 1992 Callbook, page 1221, shows you as an Advanced.
The 1993 Callbook, page 1330, shows you as an Extra.

So it took you 17 years to go from Conditional to Extra - and allthe tests you took were either by the old "by mail" single-volunteer-examiner route, or via the VE system same as today.

Nothing wrong with any of that. Not a bit. You met the requirements of the system at the time. But when someone talks about how they "worked hard" and EARNED their Extras long ago......how different it was in "the old days"......well, I kinda wonder.....

Lots of old Callbooks are online. Here's a handy link:

https://archive.org/search.php?query=subject%3A%22callbook%22

The requirements for any US amateur radio license have never been that difficult, really - I know, personally, because I really am one of those "old school Extras".

Now, since I've mentioned your licensing history, I'll tell you where I'm coming from:

Novice, fall 1967, age 13. Volunteer examiner K3NYT (SK)

Technician, spring 1968, age 14, FCC office Philadelphia

Advanced, summer 1968, age 14, FCC office Philadelphia. (I started high school a few weeks after passing the Advanced)

Extra, summer 1970, age 16, FCC office Philadelphia

Nobody in my family or neighborhood was a ham or had any real electronics background. No classes or anything like that. My Elmers were books. Learned the code by listening to other hams on the air (with a regenerative receiver at first) and then by operating nothing but CW.

No Bash books back then.

No published Q&A back then.

Sending and receiving tests at 5, 13 and 20 wpm. One minute solid legible copy required.

No CSCEs, no partial credit, no retakes or do-overs back then.

Tests given Monday, Tuesday and Wednesday mornings ONLY - don't be late or you won't get in.

Fail and you have to wait at least 30 days to retest.

2 years experience as General or above before you could even try the Extra (I was ready in the summer of 1969 but did not have the 2 years. That requirement went away in the mid-1970s).

That's how it used to be. I wrote all that not to brag but to present an accurate history and to tell where I'm coming from. I have been licensed 51 years - 48 of them as an Extra. I have been an Extra so long my callsign is not a vanity - it was sequentially issued in 1977.

And this old-school Extra says that if somebody passes the tests required at the time, and they do their best to learn, improve, and follow the regulations and The Amateur's Code, they're just as much an Extra as I am. Maybe I can teach them something, maybe they can teach me something.


The one thing I won't do is put them down just because they didn't get their license exactly the same way I did.

73 de Jim, N2EY
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KB2CRK
Member

Posts: 154


WWW

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« Reply #51 on: November 21, 2018, 07:27:10 AM »

I think you mean the old hams that worked hard for and earned their tickets vs new one that nearly get them mail order and continue to equate that to ones that really earned them. That dog will never hunt until all the real old school hams are gone. A Extra used to really stand for something and very few ham held them as they were hard to get. Not anymore. If it was this easy 49 years ago I would of started as a Extra in 1969 rather than a Novice.
Really? "Old hams that worked hard and earned their tickets vs new one that nearly get them mail order"?

"49 years ago"?

Let's take a look at the history......

The earliest Callbook where I could find an entry for you is Winter 1976. Page 502 - says you were a Conditional then. Conditional was a General "by mail".....no FCC examiner.

1978 Callbook, page 758, says the same. WB8WGC is you, isn't it?

Did you have an amateur radio license before the entry in the Winter, 1976 Callbook? If so, when? You claim "49 years ago" and mention 1969, and starting out as an Extra....but in 1969 there was a 2 year experience requirement, so nobody could start out as an Extra back then. That requirement went away in the early 1970s. Anyone who was a US ham back then knew about it....

FCC phased out the Conditional starting about 1975 by renewing them as General. No testing or anything, just a license class change. By 1980 all Conditionals were gone.

The code sending test went away in 1978.

In 1983 we got the VE system and published Q&A pools. Same exact system as today. Anybody who was licensed or upgraded after 1983-84 did so by the same system and essentially the same tests (upgraded over time) as today.

In 1990 we got medical waivers for the 13 and 20 wpm code tests. Anybody could get any class of license with just 5 wpm code and a doctor's note. FCC did not publish data on who got a license with a waiver and who didn't. Anyone who upgraded to General, Advanced or Extra after 1990 could have done so with a waiver and 5 wpm.

The 1991 Callbook, page 886, shows you as a General.
The 1992 Callbook, page 1221, shows you as an Advanced.
The 1993 Callbook, page 1330, shows you as an Extra.

So it took you 17 years to go from Conditional to Extra - and allthe tests you took were either by the old "by mail" single-volunteer-examiner route, or via the VE system same as today.

Nothing wrong with any of that. Not a bit. You met the requirements of the system at the time. But when someone talks about how they "worked hard" and EARNED their Extras long ago......how different it was in "the old days"......well, I kinda wonder.....

Lots of old Callbooks are online. Here's a handy link:

https://archive.org/search.php?query=subject%3A%22callbook%22

The requirements for any US amateur radio license have never been that difficult, really - I know, personally, because I really am one of those "old school Extras".

Now, since I've mentioned your licensing history, I'll tell you where I'm coming from:

Novice, fall 1967, age 13. Volunteer examiner K3NYT (SK)

Technician, spring 1968, age 14, FCC office Philadelphia

Advanced, summer 1968, age 14, FCC office Philadelphia. (I started high school a few weeks after passing the Advanced)

Extra, summer 1970, age 16, FCC office Philadelphia

Nobody in my family or neighborhood was a ham or had any real electronics background. No classes or anything like that. My Elmers were books. Learned the code by listening to other hams on the air (with a regenerative receiver at first) and then by operating nothing but CW.

No Bash books back then.

No published Q&A back then.

Sending and receiving tests at 5, 13 and 20 wpm. One minute solid legible copy required.

No CSCEs, no partial credit, no retakes or do-overs back then.

Tests given Monday, Tuesday and Wednesday mornings ONLY - don't be late or you won't get in.

Fail and you have to wait at least 30 days to retest.

2 years experience as General or above before you could even try the Extra (I was ready in the summer of 1969 but did not have the 2 years. That requirement went away in the mid-1970s).

That's how it used to be. I wrote all that not to brag but to present an accurate history and to tell where I'm coming from. I have been licensed 51 years - 48 of them as an Extra. I have been an Extra so long my callsign is not a vanity - it was sequentially issued in 1977.

And this old-school Extra says that if somebody passes the tests required at the time, and they do their best to learn, improve, and follow the regulations and The Amateur's Code, they're just as much an Extra as I am. Maybe I can teach them something, maybe they can teach me something.


The one thing I won't do is put them down just because they didn't get their license exactly the same way I did.

73 de Jim, N2EY


ANd that makes good sense Jim
Logged

some people are like slinky's. not really good for anything but still bring a smile to your face when you push them down a flight of stairs.
K1FBI
Member

Posts: 210




Ignore
« Reply #52 on: November 21, 2018, 08:30:34 AM »

I think you mean the old hams that worked hard for and earned their tickets vs new one that nearly get them mail order and continue to equate that to ones that really earned them. That dog will never hunt until all the real old school hams are gone. A Extra used to really stand for something and very few ham held them as they were hard to get. Not anymore. If it was this easy 49 years ago I would of started as a Extra in 1969 rather than a Novice.
Really? "Old hams that worked hard and earned their tickets vs new one that nearly get them mail order"?

"49 years ago"?

Let's take a look at the history......

The earliest Callbook where I could find an entry for you is Winter 1976. Page 502 - says you were a Conditional then. Conditional was a General "by mail".....no FCC examiner.

1978 Callbook, page 758, says the same. WB8WGC is you, isn't it?

Did you have an amateur radio license before the entry in the Winter, 1976 Callbook? If so, when? You claim "49 years ago" and mention 1969, and starting out as an Extra....but in 1969 there was a 2 year experience requirement, so nobody could start out as an Extra back then. That requirement went away in the early 1970s. Anyone who was a US ham back then knew about it....

FCC phased out the Conditional starting about 1975 by renewing them as General. No testing or anything, just a license class change. By 1980 all Conditionals were gone.

The code sending test went away in 1978.

In 1983 we got the VE system and published Q&A pools. Same exact system as today. Anybody who was licensed or upgraded after 1983-84 did so by the same system and essentially the same tests (upgraded over time) as today.

In 1990 we got medical waivers for the 13 and 20 wpm code tests. Anybody could get any class of license with just 5 wpm code and a doctor's note. FCC did not publish data on who got a license with a waiver and who didn't. Anyone who upgraded to General, Advanced or Extra after 1990 could have done so with a waiver and 5 wpm.

The 1991 Callbook, page 886, shows you as a General.
The 1992 Callbook, page 1221, shows you as an Advanced.
The 1993 Callbook, page 1330, shows you as an Extra.

So it took you 17 years to go from Conditional to Extra - and allthe tests you took were either by the old "by mail" single-volunteer-examiner route, or via the VE system same as today.

Nothing wrong with any of that. Not a bit. You met the requirements of the system at the time. But when someone talks about how they "worked hard" and EARNED their Extras long ago......how different it was in "the old days"......well, I kinda wonder.....

Lots of old Callbooks are online. Here's a handy link:

https://archive.org/search.php?query=subject%3A%22callbook%22

The requirements for any US amateur radio license have never been that difficult, really - I know, personally, because I really am one of those "old school Extras".

Now, since I've mentioned your licensing history, I'll tell you where I'm coming from:

Novice, fall 1967, age 13. Volunteer examiner K3NYT (SK)

Technician, spring 1968, age 14, FCC office Philadelphia

Advanced, summer 1968, age 14, FCC office Philadelphia. (I started high school a few weeks after passing the Advanced)

Extra, summer 1970, age 16, FCC office Philadelphia

Nobody in my family or neighborhood was a ham or had any real electronics background. No classes or anything like that. My Elmers were books. Learned the code by listening to other hams on the air (with a regenerative receiver at first) and then by operating nothing but CW.

No Bash books back then.

No published Q&A back then.

Sending and receiving tests at 5, 13 and 20 wpm. One minute solid legible copy required.

No CSCEs, no partial credit, no retakes or do-overs back then.

Tests given Monday, Tuesday and Wednesday mornings ONLY - don't be late or you won't get in.

Fail and you have to wait at least 30 days to retest.

2 years experience as General or above before you could even try the Extra (I was ready in the summer of 1969 but did not have the 2 years. That requirement went away in the mid-1970s).

That's how it used to be. I wrote all that not to brag but to present an accurate history and to tell where I'm coming from. I have been licensed 51 years - 48 of them as an Extra. I have been an Extra so long my callsign is not a vanity - it was sequentially issued in 1977.

And this old-school Extra says that if somebody passes the tests required at the time, and they do their best to learn, improve, and follow the regulations and The Amateur's Code, they're just as much an Extra as I am. Maybe I can teach them something, maybe they can teach me something.


The one thing I won't do is put them down just because they didn't get their license exactly the same way I did.

73 de Jim, N2EY

As I said in an earlier post, some of us got banned from that other site for calling out people in the clique on their BS. Especially if they were friends with the moderator, a super moderator or the owner. So now we all know the true documented history of a Super Duper Ham Radio Legend and it doesn't line up with his BS pontification.
Your history Jim is exemplary.
Thank you for accepting the rest of us into the hobby.
Happy Thanksgiving to you and to all the other hams reading this.
73
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K0UA
Member

Posts: 4368




Ignore
« Reply #53 on: November 21, 2018, 08:45:00 AM »

I think you mean the old hams that worked hard for and earned their tickets vs new one that nearly get them mail order and continue to equate that to ones that really earned them. That dog will never hunt until all the real old school hams are gone. A Extra used to really stand for something and very few ham held them as they were hard to get. Not anymore. If it was this easy 49 years ago I would of started as a Extra in 1969 rather than a Novice.
Really? "Old hams that worked hard and earned their tickets vs new one that nearly get them mail order"?

"49 years ago"?

Let's take a look at the history......

The earliest Callbook where I could find an entry for you is Winter 1976. Page 502 - says you were a Conditional then. Conditional was a General "by mail".....no FCC examiner.

1978 Callbook, page 758, says the same. WB8WGC is you, isn't it?

Did you have an amateur radio license before the entry in the Winter, 1976 Callbook? If so, when? You claim "49 years ago" and mention 1969, and starting out as an Extra....but in 1969 there was a 2 year experience requirement, so nobody could start out as an Extra back then. That requirement went away in the early 1970s. Anyone who was a US ham back then knew about it....

FCC phased out the Conditional starting about 1975 by renewing them as General. No testing or anything, just a license class change. By 1980 all Conditionals were gone.

The code sending test went away in 1978.

In 1983 we got the VE system and published Q&A pools. Same exact system as today. Anybody who was licensed or upgraded after 1983-84 did so by the same system and essentially the same tests (upgraded over time) as today.

In 1990 we got medical waivers for the 13 and 20 wpm code tests. Anybody could get any class of license with just 5 wpm code and a doctor's note. FCC did not publish data on who got a license with a waiver and who didn't. Anyone who upgraded to General, Advanced or Extra after 1990 could have done so with a waiver and 5 wpm.

The 1991 Callbook, page 886, shows you as a General.
The 1992 Callbook, page 1221, shows you as an Advanced.
The 1993 Callbook, page 1330, shows you as an Extra.

So it took you 17 years to go from Conditional to Extra - and allthe tests you took were either by the old "by mail" single-volunteer-examiner route, or via the VE system same as today.

Nothing wrong with any of that. Not a bit. You met the requirements of the system at the time. But when someone talks about how they "worked hard" and EARNED their Extras long ago......how different it was in "the old days"......well, I kinda wonder.....

Lots of old Callbooks are online. Here's a handy link:

https://archive.org/search.php?query=subject%3A%22callbook%22

The requirements for any US amateur radio license have never been that difficult, really - I know, personally, because I really am one of those "old school Extras".

Now, since I've mentioned your licensing history, I'll tell you where I'm coming from:

Novice, fall 1967, age 13. Volunteer examiner K3NYT (SK)

Technician, spring 1968, age 14, FCC office Philadelphia

Advanced, summer 1968, age 14, FCC office Philadelphia. (I started high school a few weeks after passing the Advanced)

Extra, summer 1970, age 16, FCC office Philadelphia

Nobody in my family or neighborhood was a ham or had any real electronics background. No classes or anything like that. My Elmers were books. Learned the code by listening to other hams on the air (with a regenerative receiver at first) and then by operating nothing but CW.

No Bash books back then.

No published Q&A back then.

Sending and receiving tests at 5, 13 and 20 wpm. One minute solid legible copy required.

No CSCEs, no partial credit, no retakes or do-overs back then.

Tests given Monday, Tuesday and Wednesday mornings ONLY - don't be late or you won't get in.

Fail and you have to wait at least 30 days to retest.

2 years experience as General or above before you could even try the Extra (I was ready in the summer of 1969 but did not have the 2 years. That requirement went away in the mid-1970s).

That's how it used to be. I wrote all that not to brag but to present an accurate history and to tell where I'm coming from. I have been licensed 51 years - 48 of them as an Extra. I have been an Extra so long my callsign is not a vanity - it was sequentially issued in 1977.

And this old-school Extra says that if somebody passes the tests required at the time, and they do their best to learn, improve, and follow the regulations and The Amateur's Code, they're just as much an Extra as I am. Maybe I can teach them something, maybe they can teach me something.


The one thing I won't do is put them down just because they didn't get their license exactly the same way I did.

73 de Jim, N2EY


Very well said.  From an old 1975 era Extra with the Flinty Eyed FCC examiner and the 20wpm code and all.  You are right on target with your comments.
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73  James K0UA
ARRL Missouri Technical Specialist
K3UIM
Member

Posts: 388




Ignore
« Reply #54 on: November 21, 2018, 08:46:30 AM »

EY: Thank you, speaking for the entire ham fraternity!!!
Charlie, K3UIM
On edit: Now I'm especially pleased that I started this site. Hi.
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Where you are: I was!
Where I am: You will be!
So be nice to us old fogies!!
KM1H
Member

Posts: 5104




Ignore
« Reply #55 on: November 21, 2018, 02:06:56 PM »

Quote
Perfect example of Old Fart Mentality.

From one of the most useless forum posters and serial trouble makers who was even permanently banned from QRZ. Gee the newest hams must really look up to you..... Grin



This is going to be the best you and your cheerleader can constantly come up with?
The only reason a bunch of us got thrown off the ZED is because the OLD FARTS in the clique couldn't handle getting called on their BS.
Also, guys like you could dish it out but would cry like little girls if somebody stood up to them.
NOW BACK TO AMATEUR RADIO
.

I simply replied to what I suspect you are actually able to digest ...short sentences.

In the real world of QRZ.com, which you are clueless about, age has nothing to do with it as those at least into their 70's have been banned and the moderators cover a wide range of ages.

In your case it was simply disgusting unbecoming anti social behavior which you also display on here and I sure hope the same happens unless you straighten up your act.

Grow up


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K1FBI
Member

Posts: 210




Ignore
« Reply #56 on: November 21, 2018, 04:27:08 PM »

Quote
Perfect example of Old Fart Mentality.

From one of the most useless forum posters and serial trouble makers who was even permanently banned from QRZ. Gee the newest hams must really look up to you..... Grin



This is going to be the best you and your cheerleader can constantly come up with?
The only reason a bunch of us got thrown off the ZED is because the OLD FARTS in the clique couldn't handle getting called on their BS.
Also, guys like you could dish it out but would cry like little girls if somebody stood up to them.
NOW BACK TO AMATEUR RADIO
.

I simply replied to what I suspect you are actually able to digest ...short sentences.

In the real world of QRZ.com, which you are clueless about, age has nothing to do with it as those at least into their 70's have been banned and the moderators cover a wide range of ages.

In your case it was simply disgusting unbecoming anti social behavior which you also display on here and I sure hope the same happens unless you straighten up your act.

Grow up




Stop trolling OM, I won't take your bait or sink down to your level. Everytime you resort to your personal attacks you show us exactly how "grown up" you are.
Go back to QRZ; your classless insults are accepted there since you are part of the clique.
To everyone else, have a blessed Thanksgiving and reflect on all we have to be thankful for!

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K1FBI
Member

Posts: 210




Ignore
« Reply #57 on: November 21, 2018, 04:52:55 PM »

Quote
Perfect example of Old Fart Mentality.

From one of the most useless forum posters and serial trouble makers who was even permanently banned from QRZ. Gee the newest hams must really look up to you..... Grin



This is going to be the best you and your cheerleader can constantly come up with?
The only reason a bunch of us got thrown off the ZED is because the OLD FARTS in the clique couldn't handle getting called on their BS.
Also, guys like you could dish it out but would cry like little girls if somebody stood up to them.
NOW BACK TO AMATEUR RADIO
.

I simply replied to what I suspect you are actually able to digest ...short sentences.

In the real world of QRZ.com, which you are clueless about, age has nothing to do with it as those at least into their 70's have been banned and the moderators cover a wide range of ages.

In your case it was simply disgusting unbecoming anti social behavior which you also display on here and I sure hope the same happens unless you straighten up your act.

Grow up


It's amazing what can be found in the archives:

RFSOAKED   Rating: 0/5   Apr 23, 2009 09:03   
KM1H
Total Junk...    Time owned: 0 to 3 months
I recently got put to work on a SB-200 6m amp that was converted by Carl. The workmanship and engineering practices are terrible. Bad solder joints, the amps high voltage supply is in terrible shape, its not making much power and sometimes the T/R relay sticks on transmit.

Going to have to gut this amp and start over instead of trying to make sense of the butchering he did to it. From what i have read on QRZ today while trying to research the mods he does to repair them i came across many similar comments and a link to the reviews here. Just wanted to add that i have seen firsthand the junk he builds.
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HFCRUSR
Member

Posts: 350




Ignore
« Reply #58 on: November 21, 2018, 06:18:33 PM »

Equally amazing is how you conveniently omitted the 5 of 5 star reviews for his amps, which is 6 out of the 8 total reviews you pulled that one out of. If you're gonna go that route at least be fair about it.

https://www.eham.net/reviews/detail/2565
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Not a ham, but an avid hobbyist in HF world. All things, short of transmit happen in this shack.
K1FBI
Member

Posts: 210




Ignore
« Reply #59 on: November 21, 2018, 09:41:57 PM »

Equally amazing is how you conveniently omitted the 5 of 5 star reviews for his amps, which is 6 out of the 8 total reviews you pulled that one out of. If you're gonna go that route at least be fair about it.

https://www.eham.net/reviews/detail/2565
Sorry, I'll respond when you post with a callsign.
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