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Author Topic: Make Extra test Easier  (Read 6831 times)
KB2CRK
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« Reply #105 on: January 04, 2019, 05:11:31 PM »

And someone will be recording everything to hand to them when the do get back to work....... this talk of onions?Huh
And "there" instead of "their"? Looks like another example of nobody knowing what the "multiplication tables" are. … sigh ...
Charlie, K3UIM


They're trying to make a point but I can't figure out what their point might be due to all the talk of Onions there.
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some people are like slinky's. not really good for anything but still bring a smile to your face when you push them down a flight of stairs.
K3UIM
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Posts: 401




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« Reply #106 on: January 04, 2019, 06:52:03 PM »

They're trying to make a point but I can't figure out what their point might be due to all the talk of Onions there.
Bwahah!! I'd say "ROFLOL", but I'm not sure it would be proper here. Hi.
Charlie, K3UIM
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Where you are: I was!
Where I am: You will be!
So be nice to us old fogies!!
DL8OV
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Posts: 1054




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« Reply #107 on: January 05, 2019, 02:33:21 AM »

If you are too dumb to learn code or too dumb to pass a test where they give you all the questions and correct answers then you are too dumb to be on ham radio.

I am sorry but I must disagree with this statement. Learning CW is a manual skill that requires a certain amount of dexterity and coordination and not everyone is capable of doing it. There are probably thousands of technically skilled radio hams out there who just cannot send good code, just as I can't dance or play the violin, and these are not dumb people.

Peter DL8OV
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K1FBI
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« Reply #108 on: January 05, 2019, 03:28:14 AM »

.........
If you are too dumb to learn code or too dumb to pass a test where they give you all the questions and correct answers then you are too dumb to be on ham radio.
Is that a vanity call? It’s so fitting. That was certainly an arrogant Alpha Hotel comment.
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NQ3M
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Posts: 77




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« Reply #109 on: January 05, 2019, 03:36:00 AM »

Interesting comments so far.
Current theory says, the intelligence level seems to be dropping in this Nation while the level of discourteous intent is rising. So far this thread is up to the minute proof, of that theory. My question is, applying E/E math to the aforementioned at what point does the SWR become detrimental to the transmitter if a fold back circuit is either damaged or, had never been installed during the learning processes?
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KB2CRK
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« Reply #110 on: January 05, 2019, 06:45:30 AM »

Any status from having an Extra Class license is long gone.  I had rather be advanced. It is the only class of license you can have that proves you actually knew at least 13 WPM code .

If you are too dumb to learn code or too dumb to pass a test where they give you all the questions and correct answers then you are too dumb to be on ham radio.

I take Legitimate offense to this comment. I never could receive better than 10 wpm so I guess I am one of those that is too dumb.
It took 5 years of working with CW to get to 5 wpm so I could pass My Novice, I took and passed my tech general exam 2 months later while still waiting for my ticket in the mail. Another 10 years of trying to get the 13 wpm to upgrade to general and I said to hell with it and used my now tech plus privileges to their limit. 3 years later in 2000 when the code was reduced to 5 wpm for all classes I was grandfathered into General. I did not have the ear for copying CW nor did I have a good fist for sending. But let us all bow down to the high and Mighty Advanced who thinks that code is the end all be all decider who is a real ham and who is not...
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some people are like slinky's. not really good for anything but still bring a smile to your face when you push them down a flight of stairs.
W3WN
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Posts: 844




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« Reply #111 on: January 05, 2019, 08:00:11 AM »

I am hoping the Arrl is going through with what i have read and heard on 80 meters last night on a net that i was apart of to make the Extra test easier. We are not Nasa Astronauts come on . Most hams buy there radios anymore not build them. Just my onion. Everyone please be safe and Enjoy the holidays coming up. 73s Nuff said....
How’s the billboard going?
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KE6EE
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Posts: 2804




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« Reply #112 on: January 05, 2019, 09:26:23 AM »

I never could receive better than 10 wpm so I guess I am one of those that is too dumb.

The idea that people are either smart or dumb is dumb. These days, those who measure cognitive performance (intelligences) have established that we have many different kinds of intelligences: logical, organizational, mathematical, musical, color and so on.

Most people have the ability to learn Morse Code. Most kids, during my youth, who had an interest in radios, had no trouble getting their Novice and then General licenses. When Morse Code was more widely used by the military, thousands of ordinary enlistees took classes and learned how to
send and receive Morse at useful speeds. 15 to 20 wpm is perfectly useful.

People who can operate at 30 wpm and upwards may be relatively uncommon, I can't say for sure. Lots of operating at 30 wpm is computerized for contests and doesn't require high level operator skill.

One U.S. military Morse Code course begins with an exercise to determine whether a student can distinguish between two Morse characters--not to identify them but simply to be able to hear that they are not the same.

I think Morse Code skill is essentially tied to musical ability. Some people have perfect pitch but everyone who can tell that two different pitches are not the same can learn and improve their pitch awareness. Ditto for rhythm recognition and identification. One person will hear a short rhythm one time and be able to repeat it. Another person will need to hear that rhythm several times before getting it right.

I think Morse Code ability is related to rhythm recognition. It may be that rhythm training (and there are many programs for this for music students)
might be a good way for those who are stuck in progressing in Morse Code learning, may benefit from learning how to recognize musical rhythms better.

We all have differing abilities and intelligences, but we all also can improve
our abilities, some more than others. Few of us lack the basic ability to learn most ordinary skills at a basic, functional level.

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KM4AH
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Posts: 956




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« Reply #113 on: January 05, 2019, 09:29:24 AM »

.........
If you are too dumb to learn code or too dumb to pass a test where they give you all the questions and correct answers then you are too dumb to be on ham radio.
Is that a vanity call? It’s so fitting. That was certainly an arrogant Alpha Hotel comment.


No, It is not a vanity call in reality. It was FCC issued.  I goy a vanity call and then wanted my old call back. So, it shows as a vanity. And, I lost all my QRZ look ups.

And not being able to copy or send code is just BS. Perhaps you have MS, and if so I apologize. The most comical thing you here is tone deaf. WTF does that have to do with copying dots and dashes.

If you are too lazy to spend the time it takes, and it can be long and excruciating, just admit it.

Don't come up with some bull about a medical condition or something.
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KM4AH
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« Reply #114 on: January 05, 2019, 09:36:29 AM »

Quote
Some people have perfect pitch


Why don't you explain to me what that has to do with it.  What did pitch have to do with the telegraph operators of the 1800's.
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KE6EE
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Posts: 2804




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« Reply #115 on: January 05, 2019, 10:43:18 AM »

Quote
Some people have perfect pitch


Why don't you explain to me what that has to do with it.  What did pitch have to do with the telegraph operators of the 1800's.

My point had to do with the fact that we have different kinds of mental abilities (intelligences).

I mentioned perfect pitch and then I mentioned rhythmic ability because most people can understand that these are very different skills but both have to do with music.

I then suggested that improving basic (musical) rhythmic skills might make learning Morse Code easier for people with a low-level of rhythmic
ability or undeveloped rhythmic ability.

I did not mention any connection between Morse Code and pitch-identifying skills or perfect pitch. That is the KM4AH contribution.

There is indeed, however, a connection between pitch identifying skills or pitch comparison skills and CW. That is, for those with some pitch comparison skill, zero-beating a signal by ear is relatively easy. CW ops without such skill are likely not to be on-frequency or will have to depend on some visual device for determining zero beat.

Zero beat, by the way, is no longer what it once was back in the day when BFO-equipped receivers had variable BFO knobs on the front panel. In those days zero beat really meant zero heterodyne beats so that you could ID being exactly on frequency when the sound disappeared with the BFO knob set at center.

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KB2CRK
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« Reply #116 on: January 05, 2019, 11:01:01 AM »

.........
If you are too dumb to learn code or too dumb to pass a test where they give you all the questions and correct answers then you are too dumb to be on ham radio.
Is that a vanity call? It’s so fitting. That was certainly an arrogant Alpha Hotel comment.


No, It is not a vanity call in reality. It was FCC issued.  I goy a vanity call and then wanted my old call back. So, it shows as a vanity. And, I lost all my QRZ look ups.

And not being able to copy or send code is just BS. Perhaps you have MS, and if so I apologize. The most comical thing you here is tone deaf. WTF does that have to do with copying dots and dashes.

If you are too lazy to spend the time it takes, and it can be long and excruciating, just admit it.

Don't come up with some bull about a medical condition or something.

No medical condition. 15 years trying to get to your holinesses 13 WPM and only achieving 10, So yes I guess I was too lazy only attempting for 15 years the first 5 only to get to the 5 for Novice. I do not have a good ear for it. I am sorry that I do not qualify as a ham in your eyes because my CW is not up to par. The more you post the more you insult. Did your Mommy not teach you if you don't have anything nice to say don't say anything? The superiority complex of some is amazing. I am sorry I have only been a ham for 32 years and only passed the 5 wpm test. It was not due to lack of trying or studying. I passed the Tech General written without studying and would have been a general many years earlier if not for the 13 wpm requirement. Not everyone can be an awesome as you.
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some people are like slinky's. not really good for anything but still bring a smile to your face when you push them down a flight of stairs.
W0BKR
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Posts: 2078




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« Reply #117 on: January 05, 2019, 11:58:58 AM »

Comedy gold right here...LMFAO

Testing Center
Here, make your mark...

X

Here's your license....


LOL
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KE6EE
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Posts: 2804




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« Reply #118 on: January 05, 2019, 01:01:59 PM »

No medical condition. 15 years trying...and only achieving 10...I do not have a good ear for it.

Some people who have trouble with Morse Code may indeed have "medical conditions."

Hearing damage is widespread in our culture because of excessive amplification at musical performances and listening to music at home or performing music at too high volumes.

In addition, many workers of various kinds have spent much of their working lives without or with inadequate hearing protection. People can operate all kinds of noisy gear at home and damage hearing without realizing it.

Hearing damage symptoms can be inabilities to hear certain frequency ranges or even be painful distortions of ordinary moderately-loud sounds.


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KB2CRK
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« Reply #119 on: January 05, 2019, 01:24:51 PM »

No medical condition. 15 years trying...and only achieving 10...I do not have a good ear for it.

Some people who have trouble with Morse Code may indeed have "medical conditions."

Hearing damage is widespread in our culture because of excessive amplification at musical performances and listening to music at home or performing music at too high volumes.

In addition, many workers of various kinds have spent much of their working lives without or with inadequate hearing protection. People can operate all kinds of noisy gear at home and damage hearing without realizing it.

Hearing damage symptoms can be inabilities to hear certain frequency ranges or even be painful distortions of ordinary moderately-loud sounds.




As I was referring to myself, I repeat no medical conditions. Hearing tested on a regular basis as per OSHA standards due to working in Industry. Started trying to learn morse code at the age of 15. Passed the 5 wpm for my Novice at 20. Gave up after only achieving 10 wpm at the age of 30. I do not know why but I have not been able to get faster than 10 wpm receive. I was not lazy but accepted my limitations. I am glad that you were able to get your advanced but the attitude that anyone that has issues with CW is lazy or not a real ham Sucks. One day I may go and take the Extra exam. To date I have not bothered as the General Privileges are fine with me for the time I spend on the air. 
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some people are like slinky's. not really good for anything but still bring a smile to your face when you push them down a flight of stairs.
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