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Author Topic: Restoring Faded Black Nameplates on WW2 Signal Corps Gear  (Read 700 times)
W2JJV
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Posts: 49




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« on: December 19, 2018, 02:25:13 PM »

I have a BC-348 that I have restored and operates with the original dynamotor on a 28 volt power supply.  It's an incredible receiver for it's time and I enjoy it immensely.  The only thing I have not been able to restore is the nameplate which seems to be faded to the point that there is little contrast left between the black background and the raised lettering.  It's frustrating because a sharp nameplate adds so much to the unit and includes historic information about date, vendor and model which really puts the pedigree of the receiver in perspective.

I was actually able to obtain a very nice replacement, but I would have to disassemble the receiver, drill old out old rivets and install the new plate but the riveting will look different and at this point I would rather suffer the faded plate than go through the efforts to replace it--unless of course, there is a way to restore it while it's on the unit.

The process usually consists of removing, cleaning, spraying black and polishing the paint off the raised surface--tricky at best for such a small plate with a minimal amount of "height" on the raised lettering.

Any advice would be appreciated,

Thanks and 73
David  W2JJV

 
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G3RZP
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Posts: 1096




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« Reply #1 on: December 19, 2018, 04:27:28 PM »

With my pre-war HRO, I drilled out the brass rivets. Then (after paint strip and repaint), I took some 8BA cheese head brass screws (approximately equal to US 2-56) and turned the heads down until the slot disappeared. Then installed them to hold the plate and tightened up the nuts behind the front panel .with a spanner (US - A 'wrench').

Pics available if anyone wants them.... g8on at btinternet .com   
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KC6RWI
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Posts: 135




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« Reply #2 on: December 20, 2018, 02:02:50 PM »

I learned 2 items from that last post, how to make faux rivet. I have never heard of a cheese head screw, I thought it would be a uk term, but its there (thanks to the internet) on a list that also includes a pan head screw, the one I thought you spoke of.
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G3RZP
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Posts: 1096




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« Reply #3 on: December 20, 2018, 04:10:31 PM »

Did you also find 'instrument head'? That's a counter sunk with a sort of pan head. There are a number of mechanical engineering  terms that definitely  don't translate into easily into American from English or vice versa. Such as 'spanner' into 'wrench' and 'side cutters' into 'dikes' or 'diagonals', 'tap wrench' into 'tap holder' and so on...

Who ever said that we have a common language? I always remember the fuss once when TSB asked me about something in my carry on and were told  'It's a torch' and they went mad. When they discovered that in English English, a torch is what Americans call a flashlight, they said, 'Why don't you speak English?' They were not amused when I told them "I do! You don't, you speak American!"
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WA4JQS
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Posts: 275




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« Reply #4 on: December 24, 2018, 02:19:24 PM »

love it.. in 1968 i was on the USS ESSEX CVS-9 and we were in Portsmouth for the Queens birthday event.. i was so glad to be in an English speaking country after 6 months in EU and AF countries. Well guess what had more trouble understanding the Kings English then the other places i had been hihi.... was in SOHO and thought i was turkey again. telly boot spanner lorry i know but when i asked this young one what she wanted to drink BABYCHAM took for every to figure out.. Love it. 73 Tony wa4jqs
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G3RZP
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« Reply #5 on: December 24, 2018, 03:25:00 PM »

One that causes havoc in the US is asking for a 'pink gin'. Royal Navy drink - swirl 5 drops of Angostura around the glass, empty them out, add two jiggers of gin, ice and water to taste. Supposedly because of a shortage of quinine for Indian tonic water in WW2...

There's a bar tender at Jay's Sea Food in Dayton who remembers me because I told him how to make one some years back.....On my first US Visit to the US in 1979, I asked for one in the restaurant on the John Hancock building in Chicago and was shocked to be told "Sir, the barkeep doesn't know how to make one of those"!

Although I suspect the same response would come in many UK places if you asked for a 'whiskey sour' or a 'Tom Collins' or a 'Dry Rob Roy'.....
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K9YLI
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Posts: 1311




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« Reply #6 on: December 25, 2018, 08:22:13 AM »

back to the original problem,,  if the print is large enough,,  use a  paint brush(tiny  painters brush),  spread  grease,,vaseline  etc  on the  print..   then gently spray paint it black..     when the paint is dry..  wipe the grease and paint off..
touch up the edges with  razor blade..   
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G3RZP
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Posts: 1096




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« Reply #7 on: December 25, 2018, 12:11:46 PM »

Some name plates have slightly raised lettering. For those, a THIN layer of black paint and rub down when dry until the lettering shows through bright and clear. Then a thin coat of clear varnish.
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