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Author Topic: Radio comments & thoughts.  (Read 1466 times)
KG9ZTX
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Posts: 65




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« on: January 18, 2019, 12:34:20 AM »

Haveing worked in retail and r&d for several tech companies. I do realize that product offerings don’t just rely on what’s scientifically possible, but also rely on demand, as well as financial aspects as well. Just because a product can be made, doesn’t mean it can be made at a price point that people will buy and create enough ROI to make a company and its investors happy. Then their is also the legal aspect of what our government would allow.

We see this happen with every single product we buy from candy, to cars, to homes, to even communications radios.

I currently have four different radios I am about to install into my Off Road vehicle. CB, aviation, vhf/uhf ham and maybe even a marine radio and GMRS. I would even like to have a 220mhz ham.

This is a lot of radios and alt of antennas to put on a vehicle.

In a perfect world, it would be nice to have one unit, that would be able to monitor (without scanning) multiple frequencies on multiple bands at the same time, (just like several dual band radios can monitor two frequencies at the same time) but also be able to transmit as well.

Yes one radio, that has cb, gmrs, vhf/uhf tri band ham, and aviation and marine frequencies.

Now is it actually possible to build and produce such a radio. Absolutely, without a doubt we could.

Would it be financially responsible for a company to do so, or even for someone to actually afford. Probably not. I would guesstimate a radio like that would retail for 4K-5k. I don’t know anyone that would spend that for a mobile.

I doubt the demand for a radio even similar to this would even be in much demand at all. Although I would be willing to bet having a GMRS frequency capability in our ham radios would be something many of us would like to have, without having to do a mod.

Would the FCC allow such a radio to be built? Probably not. Currently I assume a radio like that by current regulations wouldn’t even be allowed to be built legally. I could be wrong. But I high suspect that it wouldn’t be.

So what are your thoughts? Agree? Disagree? Would you like to see our ham radios capable of being more, doing more besides just Ham frequencies? Maybe allow GMRS, or other capabilities like aviation or marine or CB, or even some other non ham bands I am not thinking of right now?
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AK4YH
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« Reply #1 on: January 18, 2019, 02:21:50 AM »

There are legalities involved, especially mixing licensed and unlicensed services... I went through the same thought process regarding my LJ-70... Finally decided to start with a CB.

https://youtu.be/S41RMnTHl6M

I also thought about a TYT TH-9800, 10/6/2m/70cm FM radio with cross-band repeat, but it's expensive... Less than the FT-8900 it copies but still... I might go with it but might also get a cheap 25W VHF/UHF mobile rig. I don't want my car to look like a Christmas tree so I need to really ask myself, what do I actually need? The answer is probably just CB and VHF/UHF, two radios. I might add an HF antenna base, but nothing permanent, and more for camp operations. We don't have GMRS here, but we have PMR, for which an HT should suffice. It can get confusing and dangerous trying to manage all those radios while driving! I'm sure you mean to use most of them stopped, but the temptation remains.
You're not going to transmit on marine or aviation frequencies, so usefulness is limited. Bottom line is, you really can listen to one frequency at a time... Pick two radios and forget the rest is my advice...

Gil.
« Last Edit: January 18, 2019, 02:29:59 AM by AK4YH » Logged

G3RZP
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Posts: 1224




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« Reply #2 on: January 18, 2019, 03:20:13 AM »

At one time - late 1940s - the limitation on what you could do was the licence. Irresponsible operation by CBers changed that. In 1950, you could buy a war surplus HF tx covering 1.5 to 30 MHz continuously by changing coils and exciter plug ins - the BC610 - although the extended frequency range exciter tuning boxes were rare. It was possible to modify spare exciter boxes, though to extend the frequency range. You could have an AM VHF tx/rx covering from 100 to 156 MHz on 4 channels, just needing a crystal for the frequency you wanted - the SCR522. Not only were they all legal to use if you had the necessary licence, but Uncle Sam would happily sell them to you at a pretty knock down price, too!

The OPs original requirement could be met by one SDR: the wide band antenna needed could be the biggest technical problem. Is there sufficient demand? Doubtful. Would today's authorities like it? Almost certainly not......There could well be a military radio somewhere that does it all though....
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N8YX
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Posts: 1342




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« Reply #3 on: January 18, 2019, 07:31:55 AM »

I currently have four different radios I am about to install into my Off Road vehicle. CB, aviation, vhf/uhf ham and maybe even a marine radio and GMRS. I would even like to have a 220mhz ham.
Unless you're actually using that radio on the water, I wouldn't.

The Coast Guard doesn't play.
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W9IQ
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Posts: 3232




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« Reply #4 on: January 18, 2019, 08:42:05 AM »

I currently have four different radios I am about to install into my Off Road vehicle. CB, aviation, vhf/uhf ham and maybe even a marine radio and GMRS. I would even like to have a 220mhz ham.
Unless you're actually using that radio on the water, I wouldn't.

The Coast Guard doesn't play.

Listening, of course, is never a problem. Section 80.115 also permits shore based marine radios to transmit under limited conditions.

- Glenn W9IQ
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- Glenn W9IQ

I never make a mistake. I thought I did once but I was wrong.
N8YX
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Posts: 1342




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« Reply #5 on: January 18, 2019, 09:29:29 AM »

I currently have four different radios I am about to install into my Off Road vehicle. CB, aviation, vhf/uhf ham and maybe even a marine radio and GMRS. I would even like to have a 220mhz ham.
Unless you're actually using that radio on the water, I wouldn't.

The Coast Guard doesn't play.

Listening, of course, is never a problem. Section 80.115 also permits shore based marine radios to transmit under limited conditions.

- Glenn W9IQ
A simple scanner or VHF ham rig with extended RX capabilities would suffice for monitoring purposes, but hey...it's his license (if caught). And I seriously doubt a vehicle mounted "shore based marine radio" is going to weasel its way out of an NAL.

FCC EB Actions area is full of examples of why one doesn't want to cross the streams into some other agency's territory. Be a screwup in the ARS and it's likely nothing will come of it, unless the violation is egregious in nature. This isn't the case with other services.

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W9IQ
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« Reply #6 on: January 18, 2019, 10:56:42 AM »

My comment was simply from a legal perspective. If you follow the regulations you will be OK. If not, well....

- Glenn W9IQ
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- Glenn W9IQ

I never make a mistake. I thought I did once but I was wrong.
KC6RWI
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Posts: 172




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« Reply #7 on: January 22, 2019, 02:35:54 PM »

On a similar note from the first poster, I never knew the reason why so many scanners had the same frequency plan in them. For example, so many would cover 136 to 174 mhz or 440 to 506 mhz. The companies are not the same and yet they stayed in the same receive coverage.
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N8YX
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Posts: 1342




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« Reply #8 on: January 23, 2019, 07:03:04 AM »

On a similar note from the first poster, I never knew the reason why so many scanners had the same frequency plan in them. For example, so many would cover 136 to 174 mhz or 440 to 506 mhz. The companies are not the same and yet they stayed in the same receive coverage.
For the same reason your late-model HF amateur transceiver covers 10 bands (including 5MHz):

"Standardization".

AOR's products, Icom's R7xxx/8xxx/9500 and some Watkins-Johnson and Cubic offerings feature wideband V/UHF receive coverage, but these aren't marketed towards your typical scanner user.
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KD4UPL
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Posts: 44




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« Reply #9 on: January 31, 2019, 06:56:46 PM »

Unless you're frequently near water and/or own a boat I wouldn't put the marine radio in there. I think the legality of that is sketchy at best even if you don't transmit. I'm not sure of the exact law but I do know that many hunters have gotten busted in this area for using marine radios for communication. I also know of a professional two-way radio technician who once upon a time had lots of people start buying marine antennas from him. He got curious and started asking them what kind of boat they had. "It's for my hunting radio" was the reply. He quit selling the antennas and gave what information he could to the FCC.
Would I be interested in such a radio? No. Multiple radios serve the same purpose at a lower price point and with greater flexibility in operation, redundancy, etc. Further it's just asking for trouble with illegal unlicensed operation. I think you should still have to show a ham license to purchase a ham transmitter. Around here about 50% of all pick-up trucks have a 2 meter rig. Hunters, farmers, business owners, etc. all use them. Some in the ham bands illegally with no license, some modified for out of band operation illegally. It's all because they are so easily available.
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KAPT4560
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Posts: 551




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« Reply #10 on: February 01, 2019, 02:20:09 AM »

 I installed a BST-1 in the Caliber. I up-fitted a factory, RDS-capable radio to have frequency and signal strength readout. I also purchased to recommended antenna.

 I get disappointed in the local programming content (politics, religion, sports and near-constant commercials) around here. The wife will only listen to FM.

 Shortwave offers a bit more variety and you never know what you will hear next. Not to say that some shortwave broadcasts can't be offensive to listen to, but you can scan for something else that may be more pleasant.
 I only wish that it had a BFO:

 https://www.eham.net/reviews/detail/13259

 I have a Realistic Navaho desktop CB sitting on top of the dash and the 76" factory AM-DX mast:
https://www.ebay.co.uk/itm/NOS-Mopar-1968-74-76-Telescopic-Antenna-Mast/323213479914?_trkparms=aid%3D444000%26algo%3DSOI.DEFAULT%26ao%3D1%26asc%3D20171010182220%26meid%3Db697ee2376c045679297fd781aa58deb%26pid%3D100891%26rk%3D7%26rkt%3D7%26b%3D1%26sd%3D221397748457%26itm%3D323213479914&_trksid=p2056116.c100891.m5206

 There is plenty of room for an antenna farm on the roof of most cars. Mine has been called 'the pin-cushion'. Grin
« Last Edit: February 01, 2019, 02:22:44 AM by KAPT4560 » Logged
KC8KTN
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Posts: 1890


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« Reply #11 on: February 01, 2019, 05:48:35 AM »

Wow. Keeping it real. Nuff Said..73zs
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KE6EE
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Posts: 2790




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« Reply #12 on: February 01, 2019, 03:02:54 PM »

Wow. Keeping it real. Nuff Said..73zs

Or as they say in Italy: Wow. Mantenerlo reale. Nuff Said..73zs
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KC6RWI
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Posts: 172




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« Reply #13 on: February 01, 2019, 03:28:18 PM »

thats pretty interesting the bst-1 thingy. I don't think its my cup of tea, but I wonder, I guess you can reprogram it, Is it good reception or do you find the same few stations coming in? How did you find out about the long am antenna? Thanks, Leonard
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KAPT4560
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Posts: 551




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« Reply #14 on: February 02, 2019, 08:38:34 AM »

 The BST-1 is a fun toy, certainly not anything professional. It is capable of a lot of functions with the key fob control buttons and an MDS-capable FM radio. I keep the fob in the cupholder next to to me. I can find the tag-side lower button which is the seek button by feel, so I don't have to take my eyes off the road.
 I will glance down at the radio display briefly for frequency and s-meter info. It has morse code annunciation for mode changes and use in vehicles without RDS.
 It can toggle between PRESET/MANUAL tune, UP/DOWN tune, WIDE/NARROW bandwidth, HI/LO sensitivity and you can select the quietest FM frequency in your area to play the converter over.
 The strong SW stations naturally come in best. Much depends on the area, propagation, time-of-day and external RFI noise. WWV will indicate the best band for listening and there is something esoteric about having shortwave in a vehicle.
 Browse the users manual here:
https://drive.google.com/file/d/0B9sE-KRWMmPxWi1BUE1iVnZJakE/view

 The longer car antenna is useful in hilly or mountainous terrain where FM is useless and an AM station may be some distance away. This was an option in the '70's and '80's before XM.
 I worked at a Chrysler-Plymouth dealer and saw it in the parts catalog. It is telescoping, so it can be lowered for entering a garage, etc.
 
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