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Author Topic: AA LI-ON Batteries & Chargers  (Read 667 times)
WA3BOJ
Member

Posts: 14




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« on: January 20, 2019, 05:08:31 PM »

I would like to find 6 batteries and a charger.  Any one were to get this?
Thanks,
Ted
WA3BOJ@arrl.net
[/b]
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KE6EE
Member

Posts: 2785




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« Reply #1 on: January 20, 2019, 07:17:30 PM »

Walmart, Amazon, just about anywhere on line. Google is your friend.
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K0CBA
Member

Posts: 430




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« Reply #2 on: January 21, 2019, 10:07:40 AM »

Don't let price alone be your guide!! 
Be sure to check the MAH, or 'milli amp hour' rating listed on the unit. 

It will probably be mostly wishful thinking (not that the Chinese would exaggerate!!) but its the best shot you have at matching the battery(s) performance to your needs. 
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KE6EE
Member

Posts: 2785




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« Reply #3 on: January 21, 2019, 10:56:47 AM »

The poster above makes good points. One approach is to buy name-brand batteries.

Another consideration, beyond being aware of the milliamp/hour rating, is the net output of
the battery pack. Lithium batteries have different voltage outputs from other battery chemistries.

If you are powering voltage-sensitive devices, you may want to consider using a particular number of
lithium cells for which an appropriate battery holder may not be commercially available.

You can manage this characteristic by using dummy batteries which are widely available.

Thus, if you want no more than 13.5 volts to power your device, you will need to use 9 1.5V lithium
batteries. Battery holders are commonly available for 8 or 10 cells. By using 9 cells plus one dummy cell
in a 10 cell holder the maximum output is limited to about 13.5V.
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N9AOP
Member

Posts: 1150




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« Reply #4 on: January 22, 2019, 08:47:42 AM »

I use 4 18650's in a holder and remove them to individually charge.  Mine are 2600mAh FENIX.
Art
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K0UA
Member

Posts: 4339




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« Reply #5 on: January 29, 2019, 05:25:49 PM »

I use 4 18650's in a holder and remove them to individually charge.  Mine are 2600mAh FENIX.
Art

I though at 18650 cells came out of the charger at around 4.2 volts each.. so 16.8 volts for you pack?  Isn't that more than most radios can handle at 13.8 +- 15 percent is 11.73 to 15.87 volts?  Some only will withstand 10 percent variance.
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73  James K0UA
ARRL Missouri Technical Specialist
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