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Author Topic: Want to learn some RF stuff?  (Read 1167 times)
W4JCK
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Posts: 148




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« on: February 07, 2019, 12:23:55 PM »

Maybe some test equipment stuff?  Ham radio stuff?
I was researching something the other day and Google brought a couple of YouTube videos.  One of them was by Alan, W2AEW.  I thought, I remember that guy.  I found a couple of his videos 5 or 6 years ago when I was researching some other stuff.  Well, he's still at it - 264 videos now.  And he covers a multitude of subjects.  I'm sure somebody has mentioned him before here on Eham, but count this as a refresher.

One thing that sets Alan apart is that he's a pretty good teacher.  He does, in my opinion, a good job of explaining what can be rather arcane things in a way that even on a senior moment day, I can still follow.  Just search YouTube for W2AEW and locate the video that lists all his titles.  There is probably something you'll find that will be of use.  He's articulate, concise and easy to follow.
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KX4QP
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Posts: 396




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« Reply #1 on: February 07, 2019, 02:51:01 PM »

Nice!  I've subscribed to this channel, though I doubt I'll ever get through all those videos.  Nice knowing, though, that whatever I'm likely to want a quick course on, he's probably got it.
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AB4ZT
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Posts: 73




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« Reply #2 on: February 08, 2019, 04:54:52 AM »

I've always liked his videos.  The content is very good as is the production quality.

73,

Richard, AB4ZT
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K4JJL
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Posts: 1124




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« Reply #3 on: February 08, 2019, 06:17:27 AM »

Mr. Carlson's Lab is another good one.  Kinda elementary for me.  He seems to be overly obsessed with leaky capacitors, but definitely good stuff.
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N5INP
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« Reply #4 on: February 08, 2019, 02:24:00 PM »

Mr. Carlson's Lab is another good one.  Kinda elementary for me.  He seems to be overly obsessed with leaky capacitors, but definitely good stuff.

It's good but he pronounces "solder" wrong.  Sad
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DL8OV
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Posts: 1054




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« Reply #5 on: February 09, 2019, 02:32:44 AM »

OK, youtube blogs related to ham radio:

Charlie Morris  https://www.youtube.com/channel/UCSNPW3_gzuMJcX_ErBZTv2g/videos?disable_polymer=1
Lots of construction material plus a little Arduino to control it all

Yvo Muniz  https://www.youtube.com/user/PY2YVO/videos
Ham radio repairs (in Portuguese) but they are easy to follow

The Radio Shop  https://www.youtube.com/channel/UCHJpeSrEjtVk1YtRU3FrpQQ/videos
Mostly ham radio repairs on older gear

TRX Bench  https://www.youtube.com/user/TRXBench/videos
Ham radio repairs plus the odd CB

Mr Carlson's Lab and W2AEW you already know about, I do have lots of other links but they are not ham radio related.

Just remember to walk away from the computer once in a while and smell the fresh air  Smiley

Peter DL8OV
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KX4QP
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Posts: 396




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« Reply #6 on: February 11, 2019, 04:55:19 PM »

Also, if you're interested in the really old stuff (as in, spherical audions and Fleming diodes -- making them!) and have enough tolerance for others not to get snippy when a man in his late 60s turns into a woman in her early 70s, do look up glasslinger on YouTube.  I generally knew how tubes were made, but that's not the same at all as watching someone make one.  Repair and "restoration" of old radios is also on the table, going as far back as the 1920s.
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K4JJL
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Posts: 1124




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« Reply #7 on: February 12, 2019, 05:18:16 AM »

Mr. Carlson's Lab is another good one.  Kinda elementary for me.  He seems to be overly obsessed with leaky capacitors, but definitely good stuff.

It's good but he pronounces "solder" wrong.  Sad

He's Canadian, so I let it slide.
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N2AYM
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Posts: 153




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« Reply #8 on: February 12, 2019, 12:18:49 PM »

As far as learning basic radio stuff I would suggest start by studying the GE MastrII radio technology since it was
simple and robust and easy to learn due to the simple nature of the configurations. This technology was
a mirror image of the RCA Tactec 200 series and if you put pics of them side by side it will be obvious
that one was the inspiration to the other. Although by todays standards the GE MastrII technology is
ancient history the simple nature of it makes it easy to learn the basics of radio technology and radio
configurations.
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K4JJL
Member

Posts: 1124




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« Reply #9 on: February 13, 2019, 05:46:18 AM »

As far as learning basic radio stuff I would suggest start by studying the GE MastrII radio technology since it was
simple and robust and easy to learn due to the simple nature of the configurations. This technology was
a mirror image of the RCA Tactec 200 series and if you put pics of them side by side it will be obvious
that one was the inspiration to the other. Although by todays standards the GE MastrII technology is
ancient history the simple nature of it makes it easy to learn the basics of radio technology and radio
configurations.

That's what I learned repeaters and FM on.  Down side is they're all rock bound, so you don't learn anything about PLLs, VCOs or synthesizers.
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N2AYM
Member

Posts: 153




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« Reply #10 on: February 13, 2019, 06:16:27 AM »

As far as learning basic radio stuff I would suggest start by studying the GE MastrII radio technology since it was
simple and robust and easy to learn due to the simple nature of the configurations. This technology was
a mirror image of the RCA Tactec 200 series and if you put pics of them side by side it will be obvious
that one was the inspiration to the other. Although by todays standards the GE MastrII technology is
ancient history the simple nature of it makes it easy to learn the basics of radio technology and radio
configurations.

That's what I learned repeaters and FM on.  Down side is they're all rock bound, so you don't learn anything about PLLs, VCOs or synthesizers.

James original post and inquiry did not state at what level he is at now so I started him at the lower levels of learning, the rest is up to him and the pace that best suits him.
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W4JCK
Member

Posts: 148




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« Reply #11 on: February 13, 2019, 08:55:42 PM »

As far as learning basic radio stuff I would suggest start by studying the GE MastrII radio technology since it was
simple and robust and easy to learn due to the simple nature of the configurations. This technology was
a mirror image of the RCA Tactec 200 series and if you put pics of them side by side it will be obvious
that one was the inspiration to the other. Although by todays standards the GE MastrII technology is
ancient history the simple nature of it makes it easy to learn the basics of radio technology and radio
configurations.

That's what I learned repeaters and FM on.  Down side is they're all rock bound, so you don't learn anything about PLLs, VCOs or synthesizers.

James original post and inquiry did not state at what level he is at now so I started him at the lower levels of learning, the rest is up to him and the pace that best suits him.

I posted about Alan's videos because I thought they are a valuable resource that's available.  As far as I'm concerned, every little bit helps.  I was an EE in the data conversion and mixed signal  sector of the semiconductor industry for about 20 years before I retired.  Thanks for the reference though.

Cheers
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