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Author Topic: Setting up my shack in a mobile home  (Read 1541 times)
KX4QP
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Posts: 404




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« on: February 03, 2019, 08:51:40 AM »

I'm getting started setting up a shack.  I live in a mobile home (essentially a Faraday cage with doors), so I'll absolutely need an outdoor antenna to get anything in or out in the HF bands (FM broadcast comes in okay, but that's VHF, 3m wavelength near enough, and can wiggle in through a window with modern non-conductive screen).

One of the puzzles here is how best to get the antenna feed out through the wall.  The room I'm setting up in has a window, but until/unless I install an air conditioning unit there I don't want to prop the window open -- bad enough I'll have to run either a space heater or window A/C for comfort (neither one of which will be good for the RF environment in the room).

I can drill a hole through the wall, of course -- drywall on the inside, sheet aluminum over light plywood outside, and a couple inches of glass wool between, and it shouldn't be too hard to avoid wiring.  I'd prefer, however, that the end result be reasonably weather tight; I don't want rain water dripping down inside the wall, or a draft.  I know my way around carpentry/construction tools, but I have no experience with this kind of installation -- what hardware can I use to make the outside weather tight and the inside less of an eyesore, and be compatible with a reasonably efficient feed line?
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AD7VB
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Posts: 23




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« Reply #1 on: February 03, 2019, 09:20:18 AM »

Build or buy something like this for your window.

http://www.mfjenterprises.com/Product.php?productid=MFJ-4600
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N5CM
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Posts: 307




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« Reply #2 on: February 03, 2019, 12:41:40 PM »

Most mobile homes I've seen are about a foot or so above ground level.  Could you put the hole through the floor?  You wouldn't need to worry about weather sealing as much.  Any vacant area in the hole could be packed with fibreglas insulation to minimize air flow and bugs.
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KB2WIG
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« Reply #3 on: February 03, 2019, 04:24:03 PM »



A much better solution for keeping the bugs and cold outide.

https://www.homedepot.com/p/Gardner-Bender-1-lb-Plug-Duct-Seal-Compound-DS-110/100212441

klc
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VE7REN
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Posts: 635




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« Reply #4 on: February 04, 2019, 05:11:07 PM »

you could purchase a cable box,usually uv treated material,and install it on the outside of the home and drill a hole through the wall inside the weatherproof box to run the coaxes.. they come in different sizes and shapes..
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AA4PB
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« Reply #5 on: February 04, 2019, 06:28:31 PM »

I use an LB box to get cables out: https://www.homedepot.com/p/Cantex-2-in-Type-LB-Conduit-Body-R5133668/202043420

They are available in larger sizes from an electrical supply store. I think mine fits 3.5 inch conduit.
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Bob  AA4PB
Garrisonville, VA
KX4QP
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Posts: 404




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« Reply #6 on: February 06, 2019, 04:42:11 PM »

I see some good options there.  Going through the floor has two issues: first, it's hard to get under there to pull the wire (though there's much more than a foot of space), and second, we have a number of local animals (feral and semi-feral cats, possums, likely at least one racoon, quite possibly a dog or two, and at some point a pretty large snake -- found its skeleton) that manage to get past the skirting and, um, make deposits out of the rain or huddle up when it's cold outside.  The walls, on the other hand, aren't protected by protruding eaves; the roof only goes an inch or so wider than the house and there aren't even gutters (and no, I/we don't have the budget to make significant exterior improvements any time soon).  A cable box and some of that putty stuff, however, along with a tube of caulk to seal the box to the siding, seems like a good combination.

An exterior box like that (of suitable size) would also be a good place to mount a lightning switch, where the gap would be kept dry(ish). 
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N8FVJ
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Posts: 900




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« Reply #7 on: February 11, 2019, 05:24:37 AM »

I would drill a hole thru the wall and place clear silicon around the hole with cable(s) for a weather tight seal.
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LA9XNA
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Posts: 264




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« Reply #8 on: February 11, 2019, 12:38:33 PM »

It is possible to get long SO-239 bulkhead-connectors up to 12" depending on the wall thikness.


On the outside you can use blind caps on thebulkhead-connectors.


Just google for SO-239 bulkhead.

I found this on. http://www.pl-259.com/index.html
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WX7Q
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Posts: 21




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« Reply #9 on: February 24, 2019, 02:14:32 PM »

http://www.cometantenna.com/amateur-radio/adaptersjumpers/

 CTC-50M

Window/door feed-through coax cable jumper
The CTC-50M jumper allows you to get your antenna coax into the radio room without drilling holes in the wall or leaving a window/door open.

Jim
WX7Q


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KB2WIG
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Posts: 635




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« Reply #10 on: February 24, 2019, 04:57:57 PM »



SO-239 double female bulkhead with nuts, 6 inches long.  $8.00 each


Cable, Window Feed-Thru Jumper, Aluminum PET Plastic Flat Cable, 100 W PEP, SO-239s, 15.75 in., Each $54.99
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KX4QP
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Posts: 404




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« Reply #11 on: February 26, 2019, 08:21:39 AM »

http://www.cometantenna.com/amateur-radio/adaptersjumpers/

The CTC-50M jumper allows you to get your antenna coax into the radio room without drilling holes in the wall or leaving a window/door open.

Nice!  No drilling, no weather leakage (assuming it's thin enough for the window to latch down.
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KG7VQ
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Posts: 2




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« Reply #12 on: February 27, 2019, 02:39:00 AM »

Years ago, I installed a dryer vent to pass cables. With drip loops and some insulation I could easily add or remove cables and seal the vent to keep out the Montana winter draft. Something like this could be done in a much more skilled manor.

I had the advantage of owning an older mobile home at the time so the value didn't suffer much.

Russ
KG7VQ
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