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Author Topic: Mathematical correlation between Continuous and PEP  (Read 4240 times)
WD4HXG
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« Reply #90 on: February 26, 2019, 07:33:05 PM »

But which is 'correct' when spelt out -  'milliAmps' or 'milliamps' Then, what is general usage??

In school the instructors insisted we write 'milliAmpere'. Writng the plural or shortening
Ampere's name invoked their red pen wrath.

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VK6HP
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Posts: 553




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« Reply #91 on: February 26, 2019, 08:00:10 PM »

If you're in the US and want a definitive guide to SI style, a good one is:

https://physics.nist.gov/cuu/pdf/sp811.pdf

It's also a good general guide, with only few variations from international practice.

It is always wrong to capitalize the full written form of units, so it's 1 ampere rather than 1 Ampere.  1 A is also correct, of course.

In some jurisdictions, pluralizing the full written form was deprecated and, in fact, I avoid it myself.  But in modern usage I see even standards documents (including the NIST version) referring to "5 amperes", or similar.  However, it's always wrong to pluralize the abbreviation: 5 A, never 5 As.

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N0YXB
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« Reply #92 on: February 26, 2019, 08:44:00 PM »

Plus, there are major language differences in places between 'English' and 'American'..........

Good one! And very true.
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G3RZP
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« Reply #93 on: February 27, 2019, 01:02:36 AM »

Another quirk (at least to my mind)  is the use of a comma (,) as a decimal point e.g. 2,5dB. This is done in ETSI documents.
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W9IQ
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« Reply #94 on: February 27, 2019, 04:49:15 AM »

Another quirk (at least to my mind)  is the use of a comma (,) as a decimal point e.g. 2,5dB. This is done in ETSI documents.

I would put that one down to a localization issue. In Belgium, for example, when dealing with numbers the comma replaces the decimal point and vise versa. For example, one thousand euros and 20 cents would be written as € 1.000,20. So it would be quite normal there to see 2,5 dB whereas other countries might expect it as 2.5 dB.

- Glenn W9IQ
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- Glenn W9IQ

I never make a mistake. I thought I did once but I was wrong.
W9IQ
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Posts: 3563




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« Reply #95 on: February 27, 2019, 05:24:04 AM »

Another quirk (at least to my mind)  is the use of a comma (,) as a decimal point e.g. 2,5dB. This is done in ETSI documents.

I would put that one down to a localization issue. In Belgium, for example, when dealing with numbers the comma replaces the decimal point and vise versa. For example, one thousand euros and 20 cents would be written as € 1.000,20. So it would be quite normal there to see 2,5 dB whereas other countries might expect it as 2.5 dB.

- Glenn W9IQ

And ETSI, as a French standards organization, would write 2,50 € for two euros and 50 cents, for example.

- Glenn W9IQ
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- Glenn W9IQ

I never make a mistake. I thought I did once but I was wrong.
VK6HP
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« Reply #96 on: February 27, 2019, 05:59:26 AM »

It is indeed mainly regional or bloc convention and history, Glenn.  The radix separator (decimal point) has had several forms which depended on factors such avoiding the 'dot' used to indicate multiplication in some countries or avoiding the historical indicators of digit grouping.  Since 2003 things have gotten a bit easier, with an international convention (adopted by bodies such as NIST in the US) recommending digit grouping by blank spaces, then your regional choice of decimal separator: either a period mark or comma.  These are really matters of style and are more fluid than the conventions relating to e.g. SI units; there is minimal international variation in the proper use of the latter.

Style conventions notwithstanding, it can sometimes be a challenge authoring papers or books with international collaborators.  It's even worse being the (always honorary) book or special edition editor - a role everyone willingly does the first time but rarely again, and then only if sufficient time has elapsed to forget the previous experience.

73, Peter.

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W9IQ
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« Reply #97 on: February 27, 2019, 06:06:27 AM »

I agree, Peter. It is always a challenge for me with my global business responsibilities to adapt my writing and presentation style for the audience with which I am engaged. But the world is becoming smaller so most global business and technical people already have experienced the differences and tend to look past them.

- Glenn W9IQ
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- Glenn W9IQ

I never make a mistake. I thought I did once but I was wrong.
G3RZP
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« Reply #98 on: February 28, 2019, 04:22:52 AM »

Glenn


Quote
And ETSI, as a French standards organization,

ETSI is based in France, but is not a French organisation except insofar as its employees are employed under French law: many of them are not French - I knew people there whose nationalities included   French, Italian, Spanish, German, English and Russian, and there were doubtless others, including, I think these days, Chinese.. Its working language is English - it is said that is because the Germans refused to have the working language as French, the French refused to have it as German and the Scandinavians rejected both.....

The main reason ETSI is in Sophia Antipolis  is because besides the Cote dAzur being a very pleasant place to live and work, the building was originally let to them about 30 years ago on very advantageous terms by France Telecom. As one of the employees said to me "Who wants to live in Brussels?" (He spent a lot of time there at EU meetings!)
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G8HQP
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Posts: 972




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« Reply #99 on: February 28, 2019, 05:00:51 AM »

Quote from: WB6BYU
Not sure why Watt kept the double letter but Bel did not...
Should be watt and bel.

Quote from: G3RZP
But which is 'correct' when spelt out -  'milliAmps' or 'milliamps' Then, what is general usage??
General usage is 'milliamps' - which seems to me to be correct.
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W9IQ
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« Reply #100 on: February 28, 2019, 05:57:12 AM »

I believe that the only SI derived unit exception to the "non-capitalized when spelled" rule is degree Celsius.

- Glenn W9IQ
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- Glenn W9IQ

I never make a mistake. I thought I did once but I was wrong.
G8HQP
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« Reply #101 on: February 28, 2019, 09:04:53 AM »

Not an exception because Celsius is the name of the scale, not the name of the unit. The unit is 'degree Celsius' i.e. a degree on the Celsius scale. The unit does not need a separate name (e.g. celsius or cel) because it is exactly the same size as a kelvin; it just has a different zero for the scale.
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W9IQ
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« Reply #102 on: February 28, 2019, 09:28:24 AM »

Not an exception because Celsius is the name of the scale, not the name of the unit. The unit is 'degree Celsius' i.e. a degree on the Celsius scale. The unit does not need a separate name (e.g. celsius or cel) because it is exactly the same size as a kelvin; it just has a different zero for the scale.

That is an interesting distinction - I hadn't heard that before. Our US centric NIST SI guide for technical editing simply calls it an SI derived unit.

- Glenn W9IQ
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- Glenn W9IQ

I never make a mistake. I thought I did once but I was wrong.
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