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Author Topic: Age? Is ham radio slowly dieing?  (Read 5225 times)
N0YXB
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Posts: 1543




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« Reply #30 on: March 14, 2019, 06:52:21 PM »


Amateur Radio is CHANGING, not dying.  Wink


Exactly!   +1
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K1FBI
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Posts: 207




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« Reply #31 on: March 15, 2019, 09:23:00 AM »

Ham Radio is not what’s slowly dying. Hams are slowly dying, just like every other living thing.
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NE1U
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Posts: 114




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« Reply #32 on: March 15, 2019, 03:24:46 PM »

A thread on zed is all about hate on millenials. I have to admit that I have not bothered to open that thread.

I have noticed that European and Eastern Europeans on cqham.ru (translaters are my friend) seem younger and more interested in basic electronics & advanced electronics. Then there are the HSCW (high speed CW) groups found on youtube. Notable are yls blazing away (>>40wpm) on various keys.

It is my ambition to get to 40 wpm with a sideswiper and getting there. When asked my my local buds, "who are you going to talk to at that speed?" I feel amost like a pedophile when I mention the yls in Eastern Europe. LOL

OFs are dominant in the US. Sport for them is Radio Sport and appears to me to their normal interest in operation. For reasons that I cannot explain, I have never been interested in any radio contest. As a kid I used to gget up 3 to 4 AM & work JA land from 9 land for good QSOs for a half hour or more. Get back in bed for a very sound nap & be off to school.
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N0YXB
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« Reply #33 on: March 15, 2019, 03:52:22 PM »

A thread on zed is all about hate on millenials. 

That's just sad.
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K1QQQ
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Posts: 281




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« Reply #34 on: March 15, 2019, 04:56:58 PM »

Try this.


Post something negative about the Tech crowd and they will be screaming for 100's of years.


Their interests mostly do not match mine so what can I think ? I have little interest in chit-chat on repeaters (nothing about radio) and nothing else. (I mean nothing else) Ya know you do have GMRS.


I get some funny feeling some will some day get tired of feeding money to the corporations to talk/communicate with someone. Who knows.
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KB4MNG
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Posts: 350




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« Reply #35 on: March 16, 2019, 04:58:49 AM »

Very interesting to see where ham will be in say 15 years. Change is coming and I think we are at a cross roads. I got my ticket at 14 in 1984 and mainly hf oriented. For the most part, even today, Im the young guy.

i get on Cw which I love during the day, I work shift work. Most hams are 70 plus but during the day younger working people are at work.

On hf cw, I think as we move forward, you will definitely see a reduction of activity.
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K1FBI
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Posts: 207




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« Reply #36 on: March 16, 2019, 08:26:52 AM »

Very interesting to see where ham will be in say 15 years. Change is coming and I think we are at a cross roads. I got my ticket at 14 in 1984 and mainly hf oriented. For the most part, even today, Im the young guy.

i get on Cw which I love during the day, I work shift work. Most hams are 70 plus but during the day younger working people are at work.

On hf cw, I think as we move forward, you will definitely see a reduction of activity.

Yes it is way past time to move forward. Morse code has been irrelevant and relegated to a quaint niche for Decades!  Morse code -- which has signaled disasters at sea since the sinking of the Titanic -- is slipping silently into the sea. As of February 1999, passenger and cargo ships of 300 gross tons or more will no longer use Morse code for SOS calls.

The beginning of the end came in 1988, when an international treaty on safety and rescue at sea was amended to phase out Morse worldwide, beginning in 1992, in favor of the satellite communications setup dubbed the Global Maritime Distress and Safety System.

US civilian ships dropped Morse for distress calls in 1995.
« Last Edit: March 16, 2019, 08:29:12 AM by K1FBI » Logged
KG9ZTX
Member

Posts: 65




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« Reply #37 on: March 16, 2019, 08:54:05 AM »

Is ham radio slowly dying?

Short answer: Yes
Long answer: Yes, it is.

 Cheesy

There are also other hobbies where wireless communications are needed in areas of no cell service, outdoor activities, such as hunting, hiking, camping, off roading etc...

Except for the 30,000 new licenses issued by the FCC each year.

http://www.arrl.org/news/us-amateur-radio-population-grows-slightly-in-2018

 Wink

Yeah, but how many of these new hams even own a radio, have an HF antenna or will ever have a single QSO? The ARRL promotes getting a license for EMCOMM...


I find it interesting that any time this subject comes up the Nay Sayers always point to HF.

News Flash! Interest/involvement in HF isn't a measure of the "health" of Amateur Radio.

Yes, many (most?) new licensees these days come to Amateur Radio because of their interest in using it for emergency and public service communications and they have little/no interest in HF -- and therefore little/no interest in upgrading to General of Extra. GET OVER IT!

Amateur Radio is CHANGING, not dying.  Wink



Really? You admit that the majority of new hams won’t upgrade, probably won’t even operate, and their primary interest is waiting for doomsday or assisting trained personnel with their walkie-talkies and blinking lights. And you think that’s healthy for the hobby?

You say vhf/uhf is the future, not HF. Good. Maybe all the dead repeaters will now spring to life.

But you’re right, ham radio is changing.  Wink
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N5CM
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Posts: 262




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« Reply #38 on: March 16, 2019, 11:36:31 AM »

This topic arises every now and then.  Reminds me of Wayne Green back in the day.
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K3UIM
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Posts: 387




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« Reply #39 on: March 16, 2019, 12:25:57 PM »

This topic arises every now and then.  Reminds me of Wayne Green back in the day.
Many of us OT's think of it as "THE" day. LOL
Charlie, K3UIM
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Where you are: I was!
Where I am: You will be!
So be nice to us old fogies!!
KC8KTN
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Posts: 1887


WWW

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« Reply #40 on: March 17, 2019, 04:07:58 PM »

WOW.. Ham Radio will never die. Nuff said . Keeping it Real...  Everyone please be safe and Enjoy the hobby. 73s
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OH2RM
Member

Posts: 10




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« Reply #41 on: March 18, 2019, 12:56:34 AM »

Does anyone get the feeling that certain part of ham radio is slowly dieing? Being killed off by other alternative with cellphones iPads and internet?

I have talked with a few from around the world on my ham radio in  various different alternatives.

I would say 90% of those I have talked with have been older then me. I am 55. Of those 90% I would most are over 75.

Even those 10% younger then me, were all at least 40 - 55.

I know only 8 hams younger then 40, and their only reason they are hams, is cause they are in groups that hunt, or 4x4 off road, and they have 2m/70cm radios and the only time they are on their radio is when they are hunting or off roading.

I wonder what percentage of the many other tech licensees under 40 are the same or similar?

Now I have no problem with talking with someone older then me. They have the most to teach me, and usually have the best stories to tell as well. So no complaint here. I just worry about the direction our field is taking.

VOIP and combining that with repeaters and nodes is cool. But then again... why? Why not just get on our phones and use “virtual” “ham” radios. On the iPhone/iPad there are a dozen virtual voip “walkie-talkie” apps that one can use to talk to people anywhere in the world as long as they have internet. Give it another 50 years or even less, and the entire planet will no longer have cell phone coverage dead areas. Once that happens will ham radio really be even needed or used?

I use ham radio, mainly for being able to communicate when there isn’t internet and I want to be chatty! Lol

Am I totally in left field? I have my suspicions why this is the case if I am not in left field. But I accept the fact I could be. So Am I?

I quess you do not see / hear / work those modes were the growth is. I see a lot of new activity in digi modes so the hobby just evolves. I would not be worried Smiley
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AF7JA
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Posts: 277




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« Reply #42 on: March 18, 2019, 05:38:44 AM »

Try this.


Post something negative about the Tech crowd and they will be screaming for 100's of years. . .

That is very likely because the Tech operators got tired of decades of derision and active jamming. The people that I know, who got tech licenses are no longer active.

I remain active in that I have had an on-air conversation in the last couple of years. "An" that means one. It consisted of:
[me] This is AF7JA, can anyone tell me, is this the repeater that is on top of the medical centre?
[someone else] no it's not
[me] ok, thanks, I was just curious, that's all, AF7JA

That is the only conversation I can recall in several years.

None of the people I got my tech with are as active as I am. This includes one that is now a trucker.
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W9FIB
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Posts: 2498




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« Reply #43 on: March 18, 2019, 05:57:53 AM »

Amateur Radio is CHANGING, not dying.  Wink

I remember my early days when nothing below 30 MHz interested me. 2M SSB was my favorite band and mode. But now I am looking forward to summer and installing my 90' vertical for 160 and 80. Also looking at becoming involved in digital modes. People change all the time if givin half a chance to succeed.

Young people can evolve from "preppers" to other things IF we don't forget to treat them like we wanted to be treated when we were new to HR. And for some, unfortunately, that's a tall order.
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73, Stan
Wisdom is knowledge you gain after you know it all.
K0UA
Member

Posts: 4352




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« Reply #44 on: March 18, 2019, 08:20:12 AM »

Amateur Radio is CHANGING, not dying.  Wink

I remember my early days when nothing below 30 MHz interested me. 2M SSB was my favorite band and mode. But now I am looking forward to summer and installing my 90' vertical for 160 and 80. Also looking at becoming involved in digital modes. People change all the time if givin half a chance to succeed.

Young people can evolve from "preppers" to other things IF we don't forget to treat them like we wanted to be treated when we were new to HR. And for some, unfortunately, that's a tall order.

If you hurry, you can get set up for 6 meter Es season coming in late may. Sometimes we get triple hop and you can work other countries. I am up to 21 countries and 48 states.  Alaska and Hawaii seem to be a little tough. It is fun and fast and furious.  You don't need great height to have fun. Hope to see you there.
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73  James K0UA
ARRL Missouri Technical Specialist
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