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Author Topic: Suggestions for frequency listings for good Shortwave Broadcast Stations?  (Read 1384 times)
KF0QS
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Posts: 72




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« on: March 14, 2019, 10:11:58 PM »

I used to spend a lot of time during my early ham years back in the late 60's listening to the likes of Radio Peking, Radio Moscow and of course, Radio Havana.  I also listened to the BBC, VOA and many other interesting international broadcast stations. 

Recently, I've tried to spend some time listening on the shortwave broadcast bands, and other than Christian broadcasting (sorry, just not interested), there isn't much out there.  But perhaps I'm not listening on the right frequencies or the right times.  Is there a reliable directory, website, etc., that would have information on who is broadcasting where and when?

Thanks.
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WW7KE
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Posts: 937




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« Reply #1 on: March 14, 2019, 10:47:48 PM »

Try short-wave.info.  They tend to be a bit slow with updates, especially seasonal updates, but once they get everything done, they're a good source.

Unfortunately, you'll find that most of the broadcasters of Ye Good Olde Days are long gone.  VOA and the BBC are still around, but only about 20% of what they used to be.  So are China, both Koreas, Cuba, and all those US religious stations.  Some US stations, however, broadcast secular programming amongst the bible-banging.  There's oldies on WRMI (9355 kHz) and WTWW (5085 kHz) during the evening, and there is a ham program that airs on Radio Havana.

Good luck and good DXing.

https://www.short-wave.info/index.php
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He speaks fluent PSK31, in FT8...  One QSO with him earns you 5BDXCC...  His Wouff Hong has two Wouffs... Hiram Percy Maxim called HIM "The Old Man..."  He is... The Most Interesting Ham In The World!
KB3UWC
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Posts: 30




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« Reply #2 on: March 16, 2019, 03:50:38 PM »

Since the solar minimum has hit, i have been spending a lot more time listening to shortwave. Like you , i enjoyed it when i was a kid in the late 60s and 70s. I recently came across this website.

https://www.shortwaveschedule.com/index.php?now=true It is pretty accurate  and tells whats on now.

 Steve KB3UWC
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KX4QP
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Posts: 367




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« Reply #3 on: March 16, 2019, 05:12:30 PM »

I'm not sure how much stock I put in those freuqency sites.  I'm looking at both of them in other tabs right now, and I'm hearing stations they swear up and down aren't broadcasting on a range of frequencies they claim is blank.  Right now I'm listening on around 4200 (can't be precise, this Hallicrafters S-120 has no digital readout), to a theater organ playing music I'd have expected to hear in a roller rink forty-some years ago, waiting for a station ID.

Sure, might be a pirate station, but I've heard at least *four* stations in this region, one of them either down in the top of the 80m amateur band, or with a commercial data transmission above it.

Now it's the same organ, playing "Hello Dolly."  The music choice certainly sounds American.  I'm waiting to see if it turns out to be WTWW or WRMI on some off frequency.

This must be pirate radio; that was an album play-through; "Girl from Ipanema" now, still on The Mighty Wurlitzer or something very similar.

Edit: darn it, they just ran a station ID, it's WTWW after all.
« Last Edit: March 16, 2019, 05:24:11 PM by ZEISSIKON » Logged
VR2AX
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Posts: 1013




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« Reply #4 on: March 17, 2019, 09:37:21 PM »

You can also try here:

http://www.wrth.com/_shop/?cat=36

I suggest you download the May 21, 2018, "A18 Schedules" first. That is about 3MB in size. The update to that, and the B18 update, are smaller but also worthwhile.
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RENTON481
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Posts: 275




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« Reply #5 on: March 19, 2019, 10:26:07 AM »

I also use Short-wave.info, but really the best thing to do is tune the 31, 25, 41 and 49 meter SW bands. Schedules are best for IDing what you already have heard. If propagation isn't friendly, all the schedules in the world profit you nothing.

Try 31 and 25 meters during early evening, 41 and 49 meters during night and early a.m.

If there's nothing on, it's poor prop, and we've had mediocre to poor propagation for a couple years now.
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AB4KA
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Posts: 7




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« Reply #6 on: April 11, 2019, 08:45:06 AM »

short-wave.info is good, but I actually like SWBC Sked better.  It's an app and I have it on my phone and tablet.
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VA3VF
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Posts: 2873




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« Reply #7 on: April 11, 2019, 09:20:05 AM »

In my opinion, nothing beats CSVUserlistBrowser with EiBi and AOKI loaded.

It does a lot more than this, by the way. CAT, WebSDR, etc., and it's free.

https://www.df8ry.de


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N4OI
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Posts: 399




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« Reply #8 on: April 11, 2019, 03:52:28 PM »

I use most of the sites listed above, but not to find where to tune...  I use them to find out about the station I am listening to... e.g., power, language and transmitter location.  Of late, I find https://www.short-wave.info/index.php is usually spot-on. 

With the current trend of broadcasters away from shortwave, it makes sense to not limit myself to english-speaking stations or just those targeting my geographic location.  There is still a lot of good shortwave DX out there and even some with exotic music or revolutionary rhetoric.  (In other words, SWL'ing is still a good hobby in this day and age!)

73   Roll Eyes
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KA3JJZ
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Posts: 26




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« Reply #9 on: April 13, 2019, 08:10:47 PM »

You can find a list of other sites with schedule information in the 'Schedules (downloadable)' section of...

https://wiki.radioreference.com/index.php/SWL_Broadcast

We also have a list of receiver applications that can use various schedule lists, including one for Alexa.

On the same note, the SWSkeds reflector on groups.io offers a huge Excel spreadsheet that is updated frequently. It's a compilation of many different sources. In addition the Perseus text file that is a companion is usable by some SDR apps such as SDR Uno

Mike
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