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Author Topic: When you have an HOA, but there are no rules excluding antennas  (Read 2600 times)
K7JQ
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Posts: 1314




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« Reply #15 on: May 14, 2019, 07:39:06 AM »

HOA's; the last strong hold of the Nazis.

Have you lived in an HOA community, and qualified to make that statement? Other than antenna restrictions for hams, HOA's can and do have their benefits. Maybe not for some, but millions of people live in them without incident. If a tower and beam are a mandatory requirement in your home search, then buy elsewhere. Nobody's twisting your arm.
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K6CRC
Member

Posts: 59




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« Reply #16 on: May 14, 2019, 08:23:59 AM »

'HOA's; the last strong hold of the Nazis.'

Actually, the place where self serving whiners end up. 
Having been in three HOA complexes as an owner and landlord, fought the HOA board in a legal action, and been President of an HOA, I likely saw every side.
The real issue is that people who buy in don't even bother to read the HOA documents given to them by their real estate agent or at the sale closing by the Escrow company.  You are signing a LEGAL agreement, ignore the details at your own risk.
Don't like HOAs? DON'T BUY INTO ONE.  If you do, don't plan on getting others to accept that tower and beam. No more than they would accept a broken down  Chevy sitting on the common area grass. The board is bound by the CC&Rs and are unlikely to make exceptions. I remember being sued by a little old lady who could not understand why we didn't like her 20 cats as much as she did.
Oh, and get use to monthly fees rising.  Every time someone sells a unit, the mortgage lender will evaluate your Reserve Funds (for maintenance) and you will find that there isn't enough to replace that roof or repave parking lot.  Next HOA meeting, you can COUNT on the older couple telling you they cannot afford the extra $10 a month because they are on 'fixed income'.  That is AFTER you hear them brag about that trip to Reno in their new SUV last month where they won $500 in a slot machine.
Being on a HOA board is the equivalent of a BS in Psychology....
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K7JQ
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Posts: 1314




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« Reply #17 on: May 14, 2019, 10:51:43 AM »

Anyone who doesn't read the CC&R's before they sign to buy is just plain negligent, and deserves the consequences if they break the agreement. I believe you're referring to a condo HOA, where the "units" are under a common roof and parking lot, and possibly HVAC. Dues and assessments are shared by everyone. A single family home HOA community is different, and each homeowner has their own individual responsibility to follow the covenants. In this case, I think the "whiners" are in the great minority. A normal person that takes pride in the appearance of their home shouldn't have any grief from an HOA. I've lived in three such communities, and never had a problem. As a ham, I've used stealth/hidden antennas that no one can see, and still enjoy the hobby. And yes, I read the CC&R's before I bought. It's just that I have other living priorities besides a tower and beam.

But I agree...I wouldn't want to be on an HOA board. I'll maintain my sanity Grin.

73,  Bob K7JQ
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K1VSK
Member

Posts: 572




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« Reply #18 on: May 14, 2019, 01:59:09 PM »

HOA's; the last strong hold of the Nazis.

Have you lived in an HOA community, and qualified to make that statement? Other than antenna restrictions for hams, HOA's can and do have their benefits. Maybe not for some, but millions of people live in them without incident. If a tower and beam are a mandatory requirement in your home search, then buy elsewhere. Nobody's twisting your arm.

Apparently, some one thinks HOAs are comprised and managed by sociopaths who insight hatred, write propaganda, deport innocent people, imprison and kill women and children, use slave labor, steal from others and generally commit crimes against humanity. 

Frankly, it’s astonishing that someone somehow confuses  the preference to not have antennas in a nice neighborhood with aberrant behavior.    WOW!
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W5KV
Member

Posts: 8




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« Reply #19 on: May 16, 2019, 04:48:39 AM »

Just an update...

Had my Realtor inquire with the HOA President who he knows, and he and the other members wrote back that they are completely ok with it as long as there is no chance of it hitting a neighbors property so i’ll space it accordingly. I think this will limit me to 30-40-50ft but I need to check!

Great news!

Why stop at 50 feet?   Go for a nice 90 foot crankup.   

I'd like to go taller, but I think the narrow nature of my lot will prevent me from going any further than 50ft up. I can go out about 50 ft from the base of where the tower will be for guys, but not any further. At this point I am considering installing a 45G tower as opposed to a 25G per some recommendations. I'm reading up on the ARRL tower book now Smiley
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K1VSK
Member

Posts: 572




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« Reply #20 on: May 16, 2019, 06:15:50 AM »


[/quote]

I'd like to go taller, but I think the narrow nature of my lot will prevent me from going any further than 50ft up. I can go out about 50 ft from the base of where the tower will be for guys, but not any further. At this point I am considering installing a 45G tower as opposed to a 25G per some recommendations. I'm reading up on the ARRL tower book now Smiley
[/quote]
If you haven’t read the ROHN tower catalog, you should. It will describe in great detail everything you need to figure out about guy type, number, size, mounting and placement.
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W9IQ
Member

Posts: 3553




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« Reply #21 on: May 16, 2019, 06:35:33 AM »

I'd like to go taller, but I think the narrow nature of my lot will prevent me from going any further than 50ft up. I can go out about 50 ft from the base of where the tower will be for guys, but not any further. At this point I am considering installing a 45G tower as opposed to a 25G per some recommendations. I'm reading up on the ARRL tower book now Smiley

I would think a self supporting (even crank-up) tower would fit better in your situation. The 45G would likely be overkill unless you are planning an antenna farm with serious wind loading or torque.

- Glenn W9IQ
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- Glenn W9IQ

I never make a mistake. I thought I did once but I was wrong.
W5KV
Member

Posts: 8




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« Reply #22 on: May 16, 2019, 07:56:47 AM »

I was told that climbing a 25G can prove difficult due to the rungs. I imagine I'll be climbing the tower rather frequently as I test all sorts of various antennas for my YouTube channel. Reading the Rohn catalog now as well. Thanks for all the tips folks!
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N9AOP
Member

Posts: 1174




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« Reply #23 on: May 16, 2019, 03:22:43 PM »

If you wear size 12 or 13 wide, you will find it uncomfortable to climb a 25.  Not so much if your shoe size is 8 or 10.
Art
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W5KV
Member

Posts: 8




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« Reply #24 on: May 17, 2019, 06:26:10 AM »

Good to know Art... thanks! Appreciate the comments all.

It will be awhile, but i'll update here with pics when I get it installed!

73
W5KV
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KL7CW
Member

Posts: 604




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« Reply #25 on: May 17, 2019, 12:28:11 PM »

I have been climbing 25 G towers for at least 50 years for ham and work, some 25 G towers over 100 feet.  I have size 12 shoes and the climbing is not difficult at all, although it can be challenging to find a comfortable work position since squeezing in two feet is difficult or impossible and cramps can get annoying at times.  One easy solution is to install a standing platform at your usual work location.  I believe Rohn makes one and it would be much less expensive than a 45 G tower.  Another untried idea is to bolt some angle iron cross pieces at work locations, like near the antenna, rotator, etc.  I have never done either fix on my 25 G towers at home, I just climb down if it gets uncomfortable to do extensive work and finish it later in the day or the next day.  For sure if I wanted to install a tall tower with big array, and money was not a major factor, then I would choose 45 G.  A section of 25 G is not too heavy, and easy to stack with a homemade, or ROHN gin pole, or even two relatively strong experienced antenna guys who can just lift and stack each section.  I am not recommending the last option which could be dangerous and I no longer do it this way since I am 78 years old.  If you are going to climb invest in a new fall arrest harness and hopefully get some training from someone with experience.  The old waist belt is a poor choice, so a real harness with all the stuff is well worth probably at least the $200 cost.  Perhaps you can try some climbing on a 25 G tower, even one section at a ham dealer.  With a gin pole, it is easy for me at the top of the tower to have two assistants on the ground just pull up a section of the tower at a time for me to stack. If you put up 20 feet of tower and guy it, you can then stack additional sections, but by the time you get 20 or 30 feet above the guy wires, it feels rather strange as you stack sections, so not all folks are comfortable with the slight back and forth movement until you get the top guy wires fastened.  Not dangerous, but just the skinny tower and slight swaying may make some of your antenna helpers want to bail out. Stay safe and do not do it if it does not feel right.  Not everyone should climb.  For a moderate to large size antenna, most folks like to place the rotator at least several feet below the top of the tower, with a thrust bearing at the top.  Make sure your rotator can be installed inside your 25G tower, hopefully without removing any cross bracing.  I opted for a Prosystel rotator from Array Solutions.  It was powerful enough and I could fit it in between the cross bracing of my 25G.  It was rather expensive, but has worked flawlessly for me for about 15 years so far.  If your Yagi is small like a trap tri bander, or spider beam, possibly you can get by with your rotator mounted at the top of your tower.  Do your research.  A rotator rated at two or more times your expected wind load is probably not at all an over kill.             Rick  KL7CW    Palmer, Alaska     where the wind is often strong !
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