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Author Topic: FT 1000 MP Mark V or Icom 7300?  (Read 1726 times)
KB4MNG
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Posts: 346




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« Reply #15 on: April 02, 2019, 07:35:38 AM »

In its day the yaesu was an awesome radio. Fast forward to today, still awesome but obsolete. If it starts giving you problems, there is a very good chance you will not be able to fix it. The Icom is still serviced by Icom and really does not cost much. The 7300 is an awesome bargain for the price and there is a ton out there being used. It has changed the ham radio market. Icom is my least favorite ham radio manufacturer but I would look very strongly at the 7300 if i were in the market for a desk top radio.

kb4mng
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K1FBI
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Posts: 202




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« Reply #16 on: April 02, 2019, 11:43:32 AM »

W4JCK is right.

However...........................

If a part on your FT1000 MP Mark V dies then you could be in trouble, especially if it's a custom part like an LCD. It's a very nice rig and I do like the single function controls but it's getting old and spares are becoming limited.

Go for the Icom 7300.



Peter DL8OV

How true that has become.  Unlike the ham equipment from the 50's, 60's and 70's that folks are still refurbing and using today, I fear that a majority of the equipment made since the mid 80's forward will end up in a landfill.  Maybe they will get cheap enough where you can buy three to make one.  I did think about that when I made my initial post, but to me, 3 good years with the Mark V would be worth it.  I called a gentleman who lives in the area who bought a Mark V secondhand in 2006.  He said his is still chugging along and he hopes he dies before the Mark V does.  Jokingly, I offered to buy him a new 7300 if he would give me his Mark V.  I think he's still laughing.  I used to wonder before I bought my Mark V if those expensive radios were worth that extra chunk of money.  I liked to think that there just wasn't that much difference between those highend rigs and my more moderately priced radio.  But, after owning one and using it for a few years, I understand now.


Cheers


Glad to see somebody gets it. I am an Icom fan per say but the FT-1000MP MKV was a joy to listen to 20 years ago and still is today.
« Last Edit: April 02, 2019, 11:45:53 AM by K1FBI » Logged
G3RZP
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Posts: 1145




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« Reply #17 on: April 02, 2019, 12:26:19 PM »

It is an interesting situation that keeping a receiver going from the mid  1930s is more practically possible  than some gear from after 2000....
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K1FBI
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Posts: 202




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« Reply #18 on: April 02, 2019, 01:13:32 PM »

It is an interesting situation that keeping a receiver going from the mid  1930s is more practically possible  than some gear from after 2000....
Certainly making the 7300 disposable. Maybe lower end rigs will be like cellphones, where you throw them out every year or two. Are we heading to planned obsolescence for HF rigs?
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VK2NZA
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Posts: 262




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« Reply #19 on: April 03, 2019, 10:02:29 PM »

Not an FT-1000MP however I still own an FT1000D with all the "accoutrements", it "touch wood" still works as it should and is a joy to use, its build quality is superb, much like my Icom IC-765 and IC-761.
The FT-1000D, IC765/761  accomodate large hands and don't slide around the desktop when pushing buttons.
They all have alloy front panels and the tuning knobs that turn like velvet and other controls don't wobble on their shafts, all functions have a knob or button!
There is something joyous in their presence and build quality as with the Kenwood and Yaesu hybrids TS 530/830 FT 101 901/2's etc that many later rigs don't have.
I can live without a screen, many can't.
However the Icom IC- 7300 is without a doubt the best value rig, (since IMHO the IC 7410 it replaced) bang for buck available at present and scores highly in operator satisfaction.
I doubt though that alongside other strong signals say in a club contest the IC-7300 would come near the FT1000's for blocking dynamic range and the clean transmit audio of the 200 watt finals models.
I have only used an IC 7300 at my club and its capable and fun however it doesn't appeal to me in the same way as a full sized rig with controls at hand rather than menu's but thats just my preference.
But as a rig for a new amateur I think it may be an obvious choice!
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K0UA
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Posts: 4048




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« Reply #20 on: April 04, 2019, 06:25:30 AM »

It is an interesting situation that keeping a receiver going from the mid  1930s is more practically possible  than some gear from after 2000....
Certainly making the 7300 disposable. Maybe lower end rigs will be like cellphones, where you throw them out every year or two. Are we heading to planned obsolescence for HF rigs?

Hm... my first 7300 is over 2 years old.  I have no desire to throw it out. My second one is only about a year old.  Oh, by the way neither slide around on the desk at just over 9 lbs each, and neither require "going deep into menu's" for their operation.
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K1FBI
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Posts: 202




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« Reply #21 on: April 04, 2019, 10:33:42 AM »

It is an interesting situation that keeping a receiver going from the mid  1930s is more practically possible  than some gear from after 2000....
Certainly making the 7300 disposable. Maybe lower end rigs will be like cellphones, where you throw them out every year or two. Are we heading to planned obsolescence for HF rigs?

Hm... my first 7300 is over 2 years old.  I have no desire to throw it out. My second one is only about a year old.  Oh, by the way neither slide around on the desk at just over 9 lbs each, and neither require "going deep into menu's" for their operation.
Icom advertises it as an "Entry Level" rig and as such it is a good value. Glad you are happy with yours.
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KE6EE
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Posts: 2727




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« Reply #22 on: April 04, 2019, 11:02:02 AM »

Maybe lower end rigs will be like cellphones, where you throw them out every year or two. Are we heading to planned obsolescence for HF rigs?

As with computers.

Planned obsolescence was decades ago noted as the prime marketing tool for the automobile industry. Where it
remains dominant.

Planned obsolescence has become the prime marketing tool in many, if not most, tech-related industries.
So too with ham radio.

That's why so many of us look for other values in gear we depend upon, other than the "latest and greatest."

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K1FBI
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Posts: 202




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« Reply #23 on: April 04, 2019, 11:14:04 AM »

Maybe lower end rigs will be like cellphones, where you throw them out every year or two. Are we heading to planned obsolescence for HF rigs?

As with computers.

Planned obsolescence was decades ago noted as the prime marketing tool for the automobile industry. Where it
remains dominant.

Planned obsolescence has become the prime marketing tool in many, if not most, tech-related industries.
So too with ham radio.

That's why so many of us look for other values in gear we depend upon, other than the "latest and greatest."



Well said!
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K0UA
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Posts: 4048




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« Reply #24 on: April 04, 2019, 01:56:48 PM »

It is an interesting situation that keeping a receiver going from the mid  1930s is more practically possible  than some gear from after 2000....
Certainly making the 7300 disposable. Maybe lower end rigs will be like cellphones, where you throw them out every year or two. Are we heading to planned obsolescence for HF rigs?

Hm... my first 7300 is over 2 years old.  I have no desire to throw it out. My second one is only about a year old.  Oh, by the way neither slide around on the desk at just over 9 lbs each, and neither require "going deep into menu's" for their operation.
Icom advertises it as an "Entry Level" rig and as such it is a good value. Glad you are happy with yours.

Yeah I traded in my 756pro3 in for the second one.  Yeah, they are that good. Better receiver and cooler running transmitter than the pro3. Not to mention the excellent operating system and display. Yes, I am sure they will both be dead in a couple of years.. Smiley
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K1FBI
Member

Posts: 202




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« Reply #25 on: April 04, 2019, 06:01:43 PM »

It is an interesting situation that keeping a receiver going from the mid  1930s is more practically possible  than some gear from after 2000....
Certainly making the 7300 disposable. Maybe lower end rigs will be like cellphones, where you throw them out every year or two. Are we heading to planned obsolescence for HF rigs?

Hm... my first 7300 is over 2 years old.  I have no desire to throw it out. My second one is only about a year old.  Oh, by the way neither slide around on the desk at just over 9 lbs each, and neither require "going deep into menu's" for their operation.
Icom advertises it as an "Entry Level" rig and as such it is a good value. Glad you are happy with yours.

Yeah I traded in my 756pro3 in for the second one.  Yeah, they are that good. Better receiver and cooler running transmitter than the pro3. Not to mention the excellent operating system and display. Yes, I am sure they will both be dead in a couple of years.. Smiley

The manual states:
"BE CAREFUL! The Main unit will become hot when operating the transceiver continuously for long periods of time."

If you don't run high duty cycles, don't listen below the AM broadcast band(where the 7300 is deaf) and can live with only 1 antenna port, etc.....
The Entry Level IC-7300 should be a fine rig for you.

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K0UA
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Posts: 4048




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« Reply #26 on: April 04, 2019, 08:10:47 PM »

Been running both 7300's at 100 watts flat out on both FT8 and the old one on JT65 (much longer key down time).  The 756pro 3 would not run 100 watts safely the 7300 will.  You don't own one do you?  How would you know?  The 7300 has the best cooling system of any 100 watt rig I have ever owned.  It never gets hot on RTTY FT8 PSK31 or any other mode. Cool as a cucumber. Not so other rigs I own, and have owned.

Below the broadcast band is local noise limited, not limited by the rig, so you strike out there too. Smiley   You just can't admit it is the VERY best value in amateur transceivers today?  Why do you think they have sold 10's of thousands of them?  No other rig has sold as well in such a short time. No other rig offers as much value for the "entry level rig price".

 You might as well get used to it, Amateur transceivers are going to offer more performance for less money going forward in the future.  The 7300 is just the first rig to disrupt the normal paradigm of price and performance.  There are rigs available now with more performance, but none so far has broken its price/performance offer, but I have no doubt some will and soon.
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K1FBI
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Posts: 202




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« Reply #27 on: April 05, 2019, 05:54:39 AM »

Plastic costs less than steel. If you can live with that, then good for you! Some people loved their Yugo and that's why Icom makes the 7300.

If someone believes the Entry Level rig is better than the Flagship Rig, that it's just a secret/conspiracy of the Manufacturer, then let them be happy with their purchase and believe what they want. After all, even the Baofeng gets the job done at the end of the day!

Having owned the IC-718 and then the IC-781, I personally am convinced there is no "free lunch".
« Last Edit: April 05, 2019, 05:57:10 AM by K1FBI » Logged
W0BKR
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Posts: 2035




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« Reply #28 on: April 05, 2019, 09:16:18 AM »

Have both the 7300 and 1000 Field.  Which do I use the most, the Field.  Why?  Because on weak signal work it has features the 7300 doesn't and is easier to work the weak signal.  I like both, but my preference is the Field.  Honestly, you need to make a listing of what you want, what you expect and what you need and go from there.  They both will work DX and likely both will sound fine on the air.  Just need to narrow down what it is you hope to gain.  To me, kinda like buying a GMC vs Chevy pick up.  Both will do the job but what do you really need and how much can you spend.
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K0UA
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Posts: 4048




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« Reply #29 on: April 06, 2019, 07:50:28 AM »

Plastic costs less than steel. If you can live with that, then good for you! Some people loved their Yugo and that's why Icom makes the 7300.

If someone believes the Entry Level rig is better than the Flagship Rig, that it's just a secret/conspiracy of the Manufacturer, then let them be happy with their purchase and believe what they want. After all, even the Baofeng gets the job done at the end of the day!

Having owned the IC-718 and then the IC-781, I personally am convinced there is no "free lunch".


Why don't you just go out and buy a 7300 and then you will know and you can stop these silly statements about plastic and steel?  Just go do it. Broaden your horizons. Open your eyes.
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