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Author Topic: ARTICLE: When Can Headphones and Earbuds Damage Your Hearing?  (Read 664 times)
WA2ONH
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« on: April 11, 2019, 08:45:15 AM »

From the How-To Geek web site an article on ...
https://www.howtogeek.com/

When Can Headphones and Earbuds Damage Your Hearing?
ANDREW HEINZMAN  - APRIL 10, 2019, 6:40AM EDT
https://www.howtogeek.com/409503/when-can-headphones-and-earbuds-damage-your-hearing/

Conversations about headphone-induced hearing loss have faded away, but headphones and earbuds still pose a serious risk to your ears. How loud is too loud, and how do you protect your ears without giving up music?  (or long periods of contest or DX operating)
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73 de WA2ONH  <dit dit> ... Charlie
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"Never be satisfied with what you know, only with what more you can find out"
Dr David Fairchild 1869-1954 US Scientist
VA3VF
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« Reply #1 on: April 11, 2019, 09:24:15 AM »

Conversations about headphone-induced hearing loss have faded away, but headphones and earbuds still pose a serious risk to your ears. How loud is too loud, and how do you protect your ears without giving up music?[/i]  (or long periods of contest or DX operating)

This is a time bomb. The first generation to experience hearing loss is/will be the Walkman generation. But it'll get worse, once the iPod generation reaches their 40's and 50's.
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F8WBD
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« Reply #2 on: April 11, 2019, 09:45:30 AM »

I was a military cw radio operator 60 years ago. I was taught not to have the old-fashioned non-cushioned cans  directly covering the entire ear. I forgot once. Never forgot a second time.  Now have tinnitus.
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K7MEM
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« Reply #3 on: April 11, 2019, 10:13:35 AM »

Conversations about headphone-induced hearing loss have faded away, but headphones and earbuds still pose a serious risk to your ears. How loud is too loud, and how do you protect your ears without giving up music?[/i]  (or long periods of contest or DX operating)

This is a time bomb. The first generation to experience hearing loss is/will be the Walkman generation. But it'll get worse, once the iPod generation reaches their 40's and 50's.

A decade before the Walkman generation would be the Rock Concert generation. Early rock concerts were woefully underpowered, but they learned quickly.
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Martin - K7MEM
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VA3VF
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« Reply #4 on: April 11, 2019, 10:21:16 AM »

Conversations about headphone-induced hearing loss have faded away, but headphones and earbuds still pose a serious risk to your ears. How loud is too loud, and how do you protect your ears without giving up music?[/i]  (or long periods of contest or DX operating)

This is a time bomb. The first generation to experience hearing loss is/will be the Walkman generation. But it'll get worse, once the iPod generation reaches their 40's and 50's.

A decade before the Walkman generation would be the Rock Concert generation. Early rock concerts were woefully underpowered, but they learned quickly.


True, but the rock concerts were kind of 'in your face' for a couple of hours only, so to speak. The Walkman was 'in your ear' all day long sometimes.

Hearing loss, caused by loud sounds, has always been an issue. The Wakman 'delivered' it in a more damaging way to the general public, I think.
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N0YXB
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« Reply #5 on: April 11, 2019, 10:45:12 AM »

Hearing damage accumulates over time and can really come back to haunt you later in life. Because of my military service (jet engines and guns) and some loud music, I've lost all hearing above 3400 Hz and have severe tinnitus. Protect your hearing.

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K1FBI
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« Reply #6 on: April 11, 2019, 11:25:27 AM »

 Most speech sounds occur generally at 500-3000 Hz. So 3400 isn't so bad for a ham; don't need a filtered speaker to cut out band noise.
Now listening to music on the other hand has to suck.

Yes, protect your hearing.


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K0UA
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« Reply #7 on: April 11, 2019, 01:42:18 PM »

Too much firearms usage when I was young without ANY protection. I never fire anything without protection now, but the damage has been done.  I went to one rock concert when young, and vowed to never go to another one. OMG it was so loud.
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K1FBI
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« Reply #8 on: April 11, 2019, 03:03:20 PM »

Too much firearms usage when I was young without ANY protection. I never fire anything without protection now, but the damage has been done.  I went to one rock concert when young, and vowed to never go to another one. OMG it was so loud.
That explains a lot! Now I know why you think those 7300s are so great. Grin
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K7MEM
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« Reply #9 on: April 11, 2019, 03:12:27 PM »


True, but the rock concerts were kind of 'in your face' for a couple of hours only, so to speak. The Walkman was 'in your ear' all day long sometimes.

Hearing loss, caused by loud sounds, has always been an issue. The Wakman 'delivered' it in a more damaging way to the general public, I think.

While I went through the age of the Walkman, I never actually used one. I am sure the Walkman was damaging to a lot of people, but so were rock concerts. Probably the loudest, and best, concert that I attended was Pink Floyd at Radio City Music Hall. I also frequented the Fillmore East. At the Fillmore, it only cost $5 for a concert that included three well know artists. It was a deal that I couldn't pass up. Try to get a concert ticket for $5, in this day and age.

That was in the day when, you actually had to go to the Box Office to buy tickets. The only way for me to get there was by subway to 4th Street. And then walk down 4th Street, and cut over to 6th street, to the Fillmore. Fourth Street, in the Bowery, was avery interesting (enlightening) place for a young man. Looking back, I'm surprised that I survived.

Hearing damage accumulates over time and can really come back to haunt you later in life. Because of my military service (jet engines and guns) and some loud music, I've lost all hearing above 3400 Hz and have severe tinnitus. Protect your hearing.

I was never in the military, but as a contractor, I spent 3 years working on the flight line at a US Air Force base in Germany. Between attending rock concerts in my youth and then the F-4s, F-104s, F-15s, ... at the air base, tinnitus is what you get. I have had tinnitus for so many years now (30 or 40), it doesn't bother me anymore.
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Martin - K7MEM
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WI8P
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« Reply #10 on: April 11, 2019, 03:14:32 PM »

What???
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KX4QP
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« Reply #11 on: April 11, 2019, 03:31:38 PM »

I've never been big on loud music in headphones.  Did it literally a half dozen times when I was young, without discernible damage, and didn't repeat beyond that because it just wasn't something I wanted.

Then I found out that not all hearing protection is created equal.  Anyone remember Sonic Valves?  They were advertised in all the "science" and "mechanics" and shooting magazines in the 1970s.  Instead of just a big lump of foam in your ear canal, or a hard shell with foam inside and a ring of soft foam, either way attenuating what you wanted to hear by the same number of dB as what you were trying to avoid, these things had a small open channel, with a very lightweight diaphragm that would close off the channel when a high pressure sound wave struck.  They were made specifically for shooters -- the pressure of a muzzle blast would reliably close the valve, while even a jet engine wouldn't.

Unfortunately, if you do your shooting under a corrugated steel roof at the range, while the valve does block the direct blast wave, it completely fails to attenuate the series of reflections returning from every hard surface in the shooter's vicinity -- including those hundreds of corrugations.  One day, less than 200 rounds of .357 Magnum, and my ears rang for days (made the damaged muffler on my car sound much better, though).  The hearing paralysis cleared up in a few hours; the ringing stopped in two or three days -- but I fairly soon found I'd clipped four or five kilohertz off the top of my hearing range.  Instead of being able to hear 23-25 kHz, I could barely hear 20 kHz.  And that never came back.

Fast forward to the late 1990s, I got a job in tool repair (same thing I do now).  That first job was almost exclusively nail guns, largely the heavy ones that shoot framing nails.  Inside a closed room, the only concessions to noise abatement being acoustic ceiling tile and cheap indoor/outdoor carpet.  After a few months, I prevailed on the boss to get me a pair of muffs -- the cheap ones from Harbor Freight with microphones (so I could hear people talk without taking them off) that would shut off when loud noise arrived, then turn back on in a fraction of a second.  I'm not at all sure they helped; their reaction time was slower than I'd have specified if I were involved in designing them (might be why they were cheap, of course).

More recently, I handle few enough nail guns I usually don't bother to reach for hearing protection -- takes five minutes to get it set up for a ten second test.  My top end is down to 12 kHz, though below that my hearing is still plenty good to diagnose tool failures by ear from across the room.  I'm almost sixty, so "normal" would be around 16 kHz; not that big a deal, I don't think.

But I no longer shoot without full muffs.
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VA3VF
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« Reply #12 on: April 11, 2019, 04:07:47 PM »

I have had tinnitus for so many years now (30 or 40), it doesn't bother me anymore.
I have tinnitus also. It does not bother me during the day, only at night. The ringing is so loud sometimes that I cannot sleep.
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N9AOP
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« Reply #13 on: April 12, 2019, 10:16:53 AM »

Just go to a wedding reception and you'll know what loud is.
Art
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