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Author Topic: Does anyone recognize this connector?  (Read 1351 times)
HAMHOCK75
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« on: April 14, 2019, 12:30:03 PM »

I bought this Allied Control RAX-3 antenna relay yesterday. It seems to be a +5V relay. 15 ohms coil resistance. Switches at +5 VDC, 0.3A. All the contacts seem to work but have not been able to identify this connector which seems to go to the transmitter. The two SO-239's are connected when the relay is off. The unidentified connector connects to the SO-239 the farthest away from it when the relay activates.





It appears to take a push on mating connector similar to a Motorola MJ-1.
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KD0REQ
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« Reply #1 on: April 14, 2019, 12:36:39 PM »

looks like a PL259, maybe for sampling? is that a relay for a commercial band system, in which case it may be output to a diplexer or a sampler of some kind.
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K5DH
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« Reply #2 on: April 14, 2019, 02:09:55 PM »

I've seen this type of relay used in vintage military gear, more often with BNC connectors.  That odd connection is intended to have a wire soldered to it. 
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W1BR
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« Reply #3 on: April 14, 2019, 02:43:11 PM »

It is for an early two way Motorola mobile radio.  Transmitter antenna wire pigtail soldered to the relay directly--no connector. 
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HAMHOCK75
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« Reply #4 on: April 14, 2019, 02:54:06 PM »

Was the pigtail like a coax with the center soldered to the pin and the braid soldered to the shoulder or was it more like hookup wire with the ground made via contact to the relay body in some manner?
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AC2EU
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« Reply #5 on: April 14, 2019, 03:26:56 PM »

definitely a solder terminal rather than a connector.  Beyond that I haven't a clue about the actual configuration. Time to break out the DVM and do some continuity tests with and without the the relay energized.!
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N8YX
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« Reply #6 on: April 15, 2019, 07:56:01 AM »

Was the pigtail like a coax with the center soldered to the pin and the braid soldered to the shoulder or was it more like hookup wire with the ground made via contact to the relay body in some manner?
Ground was made to the chassis via pigtail and solder lug in the instances where I've seen similar relays.
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WB0DZX
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« Reply #7 on: April 15, 2019, 06:22:54 PM »

An oddball solder connection on a coaxial relay may be a transmitter/amplifier "sniffer" connection for monitoring a transmitter/amplifier with equipment that would be damaged by high power RF. That may be what is going on here in pix 2 and 3 (if so, probably not a complete circuit):
 
https://www.ebay.com/itm/ALLIED-CONTROL-P34-RAX3-A-W-PL259-COAXIAL-RELAY-f-HAM-RADIO-ANTENNA-/143208658539
 
Mike WB0DZX
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W8RXL
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« Reply #8 on: April 16, 2019, 03:36:22 PM »

I know what it is. That connector is the input for the RF switch for a fixed base transceiver. It attaches (solders) to the back of the transmitter with the output lead connected right to that odd connector. One pl-259 going to the receiver section of the unit and the other going to the antenna. When it is not energized, the antenna is connected to the receiver and when it is energized, it is connected to the transmitter to the antenna. I have a large Motorola fixed base transceiver that uses it (don't know what model it is and it is in storage so I can't see what model it is) and maybe a half a dozen of those relays in my junk box.
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KC9Q
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« Reply #9 on: April 20, 2019, 08:22:17 AM »

The 59-85312 RF Relay has been replaced with the 59C-483605 Relay,  Motorola called it a "Sensicon".  The RF Relay is rated for 100 W FM, Coil resistance is 15 ohms, and requires 6 volts DC input (it's that little terminal you solder to).  Source Motorola Communications Parts & Data Handbook, 1978 version, Page 222.

Mike, KC9Q
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N2SB
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« Reply #10 on: April 29, 2019, 09:29:41 AM »

It has been a long time since I saw one of these relays.  The relay sat next to, or in some cases inside, the TX Output stage and a wire went between the relay and the TX PA connection to switch the TX to the antenna.
« Last Edit: April 29, 2019, 09:35:36 AM by N2SB » Logged
HAMHOCK75
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« Reply #11 on: April 29, 2019, 02:11:06 PM »

I appreciate all these very informative responses. Now I know,

  • 1. These are 6 VDC relays
  • 2. They can handle up to about 100 watts
  • 3. The connector is not a connector but intended to be a solder connection
  • 4. It can mount inside a rig

This all makes sense. What is not shown in the original pictures above is that the SO-239's have knurled round nuts on them. So this relay could be mounted inside with the SO-239's sticking out the back and the 6 VDC, RF output wired internally.

I plan to use it as a transmit/receive relay for an old novice station consisting of a DX60B transmitter and Knight Kit R100A receiver. The DX60B has about 50 watts output so it should work fine. A previous owner modified the DX60B so it has a relay to switch the screen voltage internally but an extra set of contacts was brought out to a rear panel RCA connector.

I can put this relay in a small box with a connector for a 6 VDC wall wart. Add two RCA connectors, one for the RF output from the DX60B and one for the relay closure should complete the rig.
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