Call Search
     

New to Ham Radio?
My Profile

Community
Articles
Forums
News
Reviews
Friends Remembered
Strays
Survey Question

Operating
Contesting
DX Cluster Spots
Propagation

Resources
Calendar
Classifieds
Ham Exams
Ham Links
List Archives
News Articles
Product Reviews
QSL Managers

Site Info
eHam Help (FAQ)
Support the site
The eHam Team
Advertising Info
Vision Statement
About eHam.net

donate to eham
   Home   Help Search  
Pages: [1]   Go Down
  Print  
Author Topic: Who is on 10.0 to 10.1 MHz?  (Read 2248 times)
KE2KB
Member

Posts: 1085




Ignore
« on: June 13, 2019, 05:58:10 PM »

Hello;
I just tuned to 10.000MHz and heard the WWV time signal. Then I started tuning up the dial, and found phone activity that sounds like Chinese at 10.008.80 MHz.
Since this is below the 30 meter ham band, and there is no phone on 30m, I assume they're not hams...
The signal does not appear to have much (if any) QSB on it, so I am assuming it's local.
My QTH is northern NJ, about 6 miles west of Manhattan.

The date is 2019-06-14
The time is: 0050 Z

any ideas?

Frank <KE2KB>
« Last Edit: June 13, 2019, 06:00:34 PM by KE2KB » Logged
WW7KE
Member

Posts: 952




Ignore
« Reply #1 on: June 13, 2019, 09:19:23 PM »

10.005 to 10.100 MHz is an aviation band, mostly used for voice communications on international flights.  Aircraft communications are also on 15.01-15.10 MHz and 20.01-21.00 MHz bands, right above WWV, among other frequencies.

https://www.smeter.net/spectrum/aviation.php
Logged

He speaks fluent PSK31, in FT8...  One QSO with him earns you 5BDXCC...  His Wouff Hong has two Wouffs... Hiram Percy Maxim called HIM "The Old Man..."  He is... The Most Interesting Ham In The World!
KE2KB
Member

Posts: 1085




Ignore
« Reply #2 on: June 14, 2019, 05:37:58 AM »

Thanks.
Later, after I posted here, I found what sounded like ATIS a bit higher in the 10MHz band.
The Chinese I was hearing didn't sound like aviation talk - more like idle chatter, but maybe it only sounded like that because I didn't understand the language. Then again, I thought all aviation comm was supposed to be English...
Logged
N8YX
Member

Posts: 1397




Ignore
« Reply #3 on: June 14, 2019, 07:08:49 AM »

Thanks.
Later, after I posted here, I found what sounded like ATIS a bit higher in the 10MHz band.
The Chinese I was hearing didn't sound like aviation talk - more like idle chatter, but maybe it only sounded like that because I didn't understand the language. Then again, I thought all aviation comm was supposed to be English...
10.051USB has a decent amount of ATIS traffic.
Logged
KE2KB
Member

Posts: 1085




Ignore
« Reply #4 on: June 14, 2019, 08:49:45 AM »

This is interesting. I always thought all air traffic comm was on VHF @ about 115-140MHz AM.
Logged
VA3VF
Member

Posts: 3008




Ignore
« Reply #5 on: June 14, 2019, 09:00:47 AM »

This is interesting. I always thought all air traffic comm was on VHF @ about 115-140MHz AM.
Both voice and data are still used on HF. Check HFDL for air traffic data.
Logged
KE2KB
Member

Posts: 1085




Ignore
« Reply #6 on: June 14, 2019, 10:02:34 AM »

I guess I could use PC HFDL with either my Yaesu FT-450D or the SDRPlay (using VB Cable). I might try it, if it's not too much trouble to set up.
Logged
VA3VF
Member

Posts: 3008




Ignore
« Reply #7 on: June 14, 2019, 10:07:09 AM »

Yes, PC-HFDL with RSP1A and VB cable worked great for me.
Logged
NO2A
Member

Posts: 1400




Ignore
« Reply #8 on: June 14, 2019, 11:51:06 AM »

This is interesting. I always thought all air traffic comm was on VHF @ about 115-140MHz AM.
I read that aircraft moved to higher frequencies.
Logged
VA3VF
Member

Posts: 3008




Ignore
« Reply #9 on: June 14, 2019, 01:38:53 PM »

This is interesting. I always thought all air traffic comm was on VHF @ about 115-140MHz AM.
I read that aircraft moved to higher frequencies.
Aren't you referring to the new satellite based ADS-B system by Aireon? It has not replaced anything, not yet.
Logged
KA3JJZ
Member

Posts: 31




Ignore
« Reply #10 on: June 15, 2019, 07:21:29 PM »

I guess I could use PC HFDL with either my Yaesu FT-450D or the SDRPlay (using VB Cable). I might try it, if it's not too much trouble to set up.

You can get the most recent system table of frequencies, along with a file you can use in the registered version of PC-HFDL at the following link. The file is a zip file and is called 'HFDL system table 51 for PC-HFDL + text file'. The URL is:

http://www.udxf.nl/modes.html

A new site in South Korea just opened up recently, and this table reflects that, but from what I've been told, not all stations are on board with the new table yet. Still this ought to let you know where to tune to hear HFDL

There are a few other packages that can copy HFDL such as Sorcerer, MultiPSK and Sigmira. The links for these, along with PC-HFDL, can be found here

https://wiki.radioreference.com/index.php/HF_Software_Decoders

Mike
.

Logged
KA2ODP
Member

Posts: 64




Ignore
« Reply #11 on: June 26, 2019, 11:46:05 AM »

"This is interesting. I always thought all air traffic comm was on VHF @ about 115-140MHz AM."

Most domestic civilian aviation ATC traffic is 118-137 MHz.  Aeronautical navigation aids operate at 108-118 MHz.  But if you are flying across the Atlantic or the Pacific ocean, you will find yourself beyond VHF communications range.  This is where the HF frequencies come in to play.  HF is the only way to maintain radio contact with a land station when you are in the middle of no where somewhere over an ocean. Google "HF ATC frequencies" and you will find lots of information on how aircraft keep in touch when flying over an ocean.  It can be interesting to listen to.
Logged
SM0AOM
Member

Posts: 261




Ignore
« Reply #12 on: June 29, 2019, 12:20:04 AM »

Currently, there are 31 3 kHz USB channels in the 10005 to 10100 kHz range which are coordinated both regionally and world-wide for Aeronautical Mobile (R) services.

The channeling plan and sharing criteria is described in Appendix 27Aer of the ITU Radio Regulations.

"27/217 4 The world-wide frequency allotments appearing in the Tables at No. 27/213 and
Nos. 27/218 to 27/231, except for carrier (reference) frequencies 3 023 kHz and 5 680 kHz, are
reserved for assignment by administrations to stations operating under authority granted by the
administration concerned, for the purpose of serving one or more aircraft operating agencies. Such
assignments are to provide communications between an appropriate aeronautical station and an
aircraft station anywhere in the world for exercising control over regularity of flight and for safety of
aircraft. World-wide frequencies are not to be assigned by administrations for MWARA, RDARA
and VOLMET purposes. Where the operational area of an aircraft lies wholly within a RDARA or
Sub-RDARA boundary, frequencies allotted to those RDARAs and Sub-RDARAs shall be used"


The number of stations using this range have been quite small, in Europe only our former competitor Berna Radio used 10069 kHz.

Logged
Pages: [1]   Go Up
  Print  
 
Jump to:  

Powered by MySQL Powered by PHP Powered by SMF 1.1.11 | SMF © 2006-2009, Simple Machines LLC Valid XHTML 1.0! Valid CSS!