Call Search
     

New to Ham Radio?
My Profile

Community
Articles
Forums
News
Reviews
Friends Remembered
Strays
Survey Question

Operating
Contesting
DX Cluster Spots
Propagation

Resources
Calendar
Classifieds
Ham Exams
Ham Links
List Archives
News Articles
Product Reviews
QSL Managers

Site Info
eHam Help (FAQ)
Support the site
The eHam Team
Advertising Info
Vision Statement
About eHam.net

donate to eham
   Home   Help Search  
Pages: Prev 1 ... 7 8 9 10 11 [12] 13 Next   Go Down
  Print  
Author Topic: Goodbye tubes.  (Read 6857 times)
K4EMF
Member

Posts: 181




Ignore
« Reply #165 on: August 18, 2019, 06:31:37 PM »


Yes, I do realize this is a hobby and (almost) anything goes in a hobby.  But it's not by any means modern communications.  More of an affectation to a commercially and militarily dead mode.  I get it, you like it.  But it's just not used in the "real" world anymore, for some very good reasons (there are MANY better modes).


I get it, you don't like it.  As a hobby I guess I just don't see how what the military and or commercial operators use or don't use is particularly relevant to us.
 

Quote
Yes, tap codes live on.  See this for a basic background:  https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Tap_code

I have to admit I'd never even heard of tap codes.  Has anyone developed a new digital mode based on tap codes yet?  (sarcasm)
« Last Edit: August 18, 2019, 06:33:46 PM by K4EMF » Logged
W0BTU
Member

Posts: 2261


WWW

Ignore
« Reply #166 on: August 18, 2019, 07:00:33 PM »

It is painfully clear that the younger generation is inferior, apathetic and inadequate. This has been known by generation after generation.

- Glenn W9IQ

LOL! ;-)
Logged

G3RZP
Member

Posts: 1284




Ignore
« Reply #167 on: August 19, 2019, 01:40:13 AM »

Brian said:

Quote
Sounds like one smart lady with a great earning potential.  Definitely a keeper!

Not now! She retired at age 58 - tired of the hassle of travelling the world, and also suffering 'managerial thrombosis'  -  i.e. having a manager who was a clot!
Logged
K6BRN
Member

Posts: 1294




Ignore
« Reply #168 on: August 19, 2019, 05:46:54 AM »

 Hi Jay  (K4EMF):

Quote
I get it, you don't like it.  As a hobby I guess I just don't see how what the military and or commercial operators use or don't use is particularly relevant to us.

Actually, I'm indifferent to CW as i rarely use it and enjoy digital modes more - my entire career has been based on digital comms and perhaps that's why.  Though I also enjoy a good rag=chew on SSB or AM.  I'm glad you enjoy using the code and more power to you.  But its purely a ham radio thing these days and perhaps one of the reasons hams are considered just a little eccentric by the general public (thought bubble of a 20-Y.O. standing next to a 60+ man with a straight key.)


Glenn (W9IQ):

Quote
Insert Quote
It is painfully clear that the younger generation is inferior, apathetic and inadequate. This has been known by generation after generation.   - Glenn W9IQ

OK!  Now (funny) irony!  You're doing a very credible impression of George Carlin!  I can see I'm going to have to "up my game" to compete at all in online humor.

Brian - K6BRN
Logged
K6BRN
Member

Posts: 1294




Ignore
« Reply #169 on: August 19, 2019, 06:02:34 AM »

Michael (K6AER):

Quote
Tap code is the rhythm of old-fashioned Morse code. I will bet 40% of the hams know CQ without a tone.

You're thinking of "American Morse Code". also known as "Railroad Morse".  Amateurs use "International Morse" and even the character construction is different.  Tap codes are a different animal entirely and are completely unrelated to morse code.

Quote
All pilots from WWII to current pilots are required to know Morse code. The VOR (VHF108-118 MHz.)  navigation aids are identified in Morse code. LAX, SFO, and my home airport CMA.

Maybe.  But one of my best buddies is a recently retired Continental pilot (retired during the merger) who has freely confessed he can't send/receive Morse code - just recognize a few sequences .  Rick had quite a chuckle about it when I asked him about it this AM.  Oh... and he's ex-Air Force.

Brian - K6BRN
Logged
VK6HP
Member

Posts: 525




Ignore
« Reply #170 on: August 19, 2019, 08:04:39 AM »

Navaid morse is send veeeerrrryyyyy sloooowwwwwlllly...and even then most pilots refer to the cheat boxes written on the navigation charts.  Being able to read the ident without a chart is considered by fellow aviators to be one of my more useless skills Smiley
Logged
KM1H
Member

Posts: 5296




Ignore
« Reply #171 on: August 19, 2019, 08:43:29 AM »

Quote
When trying to introduce grammar school pupils to amateur radio, they give "blank stares" back. Amateur radio lives up to its description of a "faintly embarrassing hobby" that it got in Time Magazine some decade ago.

I didnt read that article but OTOH I would not have wasted money on that biased rag and only glanced thru it while in various waiting rooms.

I have mentored a few into the "hobby" but those were older Comcast CATV Service Techs who started with "What are all those antennas"?
All 3 are Extras and one is in love with CW.

Quote
From day one, the work was solidly obstructed by the national society that had one single objective; quantity over quality.

As does the ARRL where the name of the game is for employees/volunteers to stay in power forever. With only about 20% of FCC licensed hams ARRL members they are an embarrassment and not a resource.

Quote
The market for amateur radio amplifiers may be diminishing in general. Ageing population, EMC problems and a general lack of knowledge of how to operate and service an amplifier properly may contribute. Often, EMC problems with the neighbours start in earnest when the 200-300 W levels are reached. In countries like Germany, you also have to file a notice of EMF compliance with the Authorities, which may put off some prospective amplifier buyers.

I dont know about that. Amp companies come and go and at present they are at or near the highest numbers as several non US companies have become FCC certified. Those companies are far superior in quality and engineering than Ameritron.
Ameritron sales of the Big 3 amps are in the 100-200 per year range of each model but with a common platform including most components small common runs is profitable as the only big expense is tube choice.
OTOH their AL-811 and AL-80B family are widely popular. The AL-572B and AL-800's are odd choices which are seldom mentioned and I wasnt given their production numbers as I didnt ask Roll Eyes
The AL-811's exemplify the complete dumbing down of the modern ham and I cant think of a current analogy in the automotive world that would describe a Schei├čkiste Shocked

Carl
Logged
K4EMF
Member

Posts: 181




Ignore
« Reply #172 on: August 19, 2019, 09:03:43 AM »

...... Being able to read the ident without a chart is considered by fellow aviators to be one of my more useless skills Smiley

 Cool
Logged
KM1H
Member

Posts: 5296




Ignore
« Reply #173 on: August 19, 2019, 09:46:46 AM »

Quote
Actually, the most viewed professional site is LinkedIn, not QRZ, which is an amateur hobby site that no company offering a serious professional job really cares about.  

Actually LinkedIn is of minimal interest to those in this discussion unless they are perpetually in search of a "professional" job for whatever reason.

Returning to Earth and this forum, QRZ.com offers a start in understanding who we are dealing with. Many continue to hide from that and after a prompt or two without a result I dismiss them as IMD distortion. Grin

Quote
And people who were unable to make the grade, do the work and actually get a degree from an accredited professional program at a university are usually the ones most resentful of those that actually have degrees and are successful.

Typical snob talk and far from reality in many cases. Many of those without degrees are often resentful of those that actually have them and are so poorly educated or suited for a real world environment that they cause project development to lag or even fail. Those individuals often show up on LinkedIn looking to save face as consultants.  Being a consultant saves companies a lot of money for multiple reasons plus they can be fired at will.

My reputation in the Boston RF world meant I never had to go begging for a job,  from Sr Tech to Sr Engineer, offers came to me on a regular basis. I also chose only those that were within a ~ 15- 20 minute commute.

Raytheon is one example of a company who has a long history of outsourcing jobs and even complete projects. In the past their treatment of employees caused unions to be formed right into the so called "professional" levels. It was/is a joke in the Boston area that everyone worked for Raytheon at some point. It is still a revolving door company.

An example is a company where I was a R&D engineer for millimeter wave products was hired by Raytheon to do all the RF development and interfacing to their digital electronics. They were a PITA to deal with as specs changed on the fly without discussion. I was in one meeting where one of their managers was berating us and I lit into him with both feet.
Trying to deal with union pukes in their engineering groups was just for starters. My manager was aghast but let me continue as I ticked off on my fingers what was really going on behind the scenes via many ham contacts which was a huge network in those days of the late 90's. Our company president nailed the Raytheon honcho at the top of that particular food chain, the a'hole that showed up was never seen again, and the project returned to a smooth process.  Likely the union honcho got a nice cash payoff to cooperate Shocked
I got a nice raise. Grin

Raytheon was also a raider and grabbed several of our test techs at a nice pay increase but being Raytheon they were gone when the end product was delivered. We did not rehire them.....

Carl
Logged
K6BSU
Member

Posts: 55




Ignore
« Reply #174 on: August 19, 2019, 09:54:19 AM »

N2SR.  To answer your post.  I passed the Extra exam in 1955, after being a General for 3 years.  I did not have a "Study Guide".  I took the exam at the FCC Regional office in Los Angeles, and passed 20WPM Morse using pencil/paper and a straight key.

All this BEFORE entering college in 1957.
Logged
K6BRN
Member

Posts: 1294




Ignore
« Reply #175 on: August 19, 2019, 11:10:37 AM »

Carl:

Quote
Actually LinkedIn is of minimal interest to those in this discussion unless they are perpetually in search of a "professional" job for whatever reason

Um.  You mean like...  young, not yet retired and still working?  Exactly the type of people we need to continue the Amateur Radio hobby?  Kind of a "Let it die.  Who cares what happens after I'm gone" stance.  Hmmmm.

Well... there you go.

Brian - K6BRN
Logged
KM1H
Member

Posts: 5296




Ignore
« Reply #176 on: August 19, 2019, 11:17:26 AM »

Quote
Um.  You mean like...  young, not yet retired and still working?  Exactly the type of people we need to continue the Amateur Radio hobby?  Kind of a "Let it die.  Who cares what happens after I'm gone" stance.  Hmmmm.

Well... there you go.

Brian - K6BRN

A perfect example of fuzzy thinking with no links between them.
Par for the course.
Logged
K4EMF
Member

Posts: 181




Ignore
« Reply #177 on: August 19, 2019, 12:14:45 PM »


....The AL-811's exemplify the complete dumbing down of the modern ham...
Carl

I'm always interested in experience based opinions.  Any elaboration you'd care to offer would be appreciated.

Jay
Logged
KM1H
Member

Posts: 5296




Ignore
« Reply #178 on: August 19, 2019, 12:17:47 PM »

Id suggest learning how to use the Search function on here and QRZ. Saves me time for other fun.

Logged
K4EMF
Member

Posts: 181




Ignore
« Reply #179 on: August 19, 2019, 01:33:40 PM »

...All pilots from WWII to current pilots are required to know Morse code. The VOR (VHF108-118 MHz.)  navigation aids are identified in Morse code. LAX, SFO, and my home airport CMA.


You mean Military pilots?   I've been a professional civilian pilot for over 30 years and I've never been required to know Morse Code. 
« Last Edit: August 19, 2019, 01:36:51 PM by K4EMF » Logged
Pages: Prev 1 ... 7 8 9 10 11 [12] 13 Next   Go Up
  Print  
 
Jump to:  

Powered by MySQL Powered by PHP Powered by SMF 1.1.11 | SMF © 2006-2009, Simple Machines LLC Valid XHTML 1.0! Valid CSS!