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Author Topic: Noise level - Bush vs Base - what to do?  (Read 463 times)
CGDUZ
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Posts: 13




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« on: July 14, 2019, 06:29:48 PM »

The off-grid remote station I installed at the lake last year puts the home rig to shame.   Both are 100w Kenwoods with similar antennae - trapped dipole 60' up at the lake vs OCFD at 30' in the noisy town neighborhood.   S2-3 noise floor in the bush vs S7-9 at home. 
 
Tower & beam in town would be nice, but out of the question.  Any suggestions what to make HF worth living at home?     
 
Al,
VE3VTT
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KG5AHC
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Posts: 239




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« Reply #1 on: July 14, 2019, 08:16:25 PM »

Magnetic loop.   Gives directionality in the plane of the loop, and nulls on both sides. Stand just a few feet off the ground. Not affected by ground losses, no radials to mess with. Work both NVIS and DX.

Worth a try at least.

Still testing the one i built last week, liking it so far.

Regard, Jeff KG5AHC.

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WB6BYU
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Posts: 18381




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« Reply #2 on: July 14, 2019, 09:01:00 PM »

Try swapping out the OCFD at the home station for a trap dipole or a doublet with
an effective balun.

Many OCFD designs are very susceptible to common mode current, so the feedline
can pick up noise as it passes by all the electronic equipment in the house.
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K4SAV
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Posts: 2620




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« Reply #3 on: July 15, 2019, 05:28:36 AM »

There are now several manufacturers selling OCF antennas that use a voltage mode balun. That guarantees feedline common mode currents, most likely RFI, and most likely excess noise.  Did you get one of those?

Jerry,  K4SAV
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WA7ARK
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Posts: 608




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« Reply #4 on: July 15, 2019, 02:50:55 PM »

My take on reducing the receiver noise level when your (and your close neighbors houses) are filled with switching power supplies.

As already suggested, OCF is about the worst antenna you can choose, especially the kind that relies on radiation from the coax, like the Windoms or BuckMasters of the world...
« Last Edit: July 15, 2019, 02:59:44 PM by WA7ARK » Logged

Mike, WA7ARK
CGDUZ
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Posts: 13




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« Reply #5 on: July 15, 2019, 03:18:25 PM »

Thanks all.  Helpful insights and questions. The OCF is home-brew using a 4:1 current balun that I built from 2 Ferrite toroids, same as the one at the remote site.  CMC on the OCF is minimal with a 1:1 choke balun at the rig end. Like WA7 says, I bet the neighborhood noise with the OCF at low 30' feed height is the real demon.  KG5's idea for a delta loop came up earlier and I wrote it off because of wind load and roof mounting issues.  There are some who live and swear by the OCF out of the urban noise zone.  In town is definitely out for it and I will now take a more heartful look at the loop. 

73,

Al - VE3VTT
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WA3SKN
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Posts: 6986




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« Reply #6 on: July 15, 2019, 04:17:38 PM »

1.  Antennae are on insects.  See "Antennas" by Kraus, 1951.
2. You have a local noise source at home.  You should locate and eliminate it.  It can be done, but can be frustrating.
Now what frequency(s) are you talking about?

-Mike.
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CGDUZ
Member

Posts: 13




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« Reply #7 on: July 16, 2019, 06:37:39 PM »

40/20m, with hydro lines running 50' parallel to the signal path, a hockey arena next door, two factories down the block and a couple dozen wireless nets on the wi-fi menu.   

It was kind of a non-starter from the start. 

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W1VT
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Posts: 3286




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« Reply #8 on: July 16, 2019, 06:44:57 PM »

Is there any way to set up a station in a quiet location that you can control remotely from your home location?
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WA3SKN
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Posts: 6986




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« Reply #9 on: July 19, 2019, 04:18:28 PM »

"40/20m"...?
A directional loop or ferrite bar antenna will help locate the noise sources best.  They are not difficult or expensive to build either.
Is the radio portable in any way?

-Mike.
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