Call Search
     

New to Ham Radio?
My Profile

Community
Articles
Forums
News
Reviews
Friends Remembered
Strays
Survey Question

Operating
Contesting
DX Cluster Spots
Propagation

Resources
Calendar
Classifieds
Ham Exams
Ham Links
List Archives
News Articles
Product Reviews
QSL Managers

Site Info
eHam Help (FAQ)
Support the site
The eHam Team
Advertising Info
Vision Statement
About eHam.net

donate to eham
   Home   Help Search  
Pages: [1]   Go Down
  Print  
Author Topic: new station  (Read 2638 times)
LASER529
Member

Posts: 16


WWW

Ignore
« on: January 07, 2007, 12:34:56 AM »

I am now studying for my technicians license and will hopefully have it this month. I would like any suggestions on my first radio. I live on a ground floor apt. right now and i dont think they will let me install an atenna outside.. I want a radio I wont have to upgrade later(just atenna system only) if that's possible. Also what would be a good band to start on? Any help would be greatly appreciated.................
Logged
LASER529
Member

Posts: 16


WWW

Ignore
« Reply #1 on: January 07, 2007, 03:36:22 AM »

I forgot to include some info in the post...
I live in northern ky.
my e-mail is:
scott_ellis4@msn.com
Logged
K7PEH
Member

Posts: 1146




Ignore
« Reply #2 on: January 07, 2007, 08:19:32 AM »

First, I am making the following assumptions...

      --- you will operate VHF/UHF
      --- you will operate FM
      --- you will likely want to hit repeaters

So, if I were in your situation, I would go with a mobile rig (I assume you have a mobile device such as a car or truck).  With a technician, assuming the traditional technician bands, you might consider a 144/430 MHz mobile rig with a dual-band antenna.

Alternatively,  consider a mobile rig that allows you to operate from the apartment as well using an antenna that allows you to hit repeaters or have good line-of-sight access (which is probably hard to do on a ground floor apartment).  Maybe a J-Pole or something of that ilk mounted on your patio area (hopefully).

I suggest FM as the operating mode since weak signal work such as CW or SSB would probably require a much more substantial beam antenna (usually) that is mounted higher up.

As far as an actual rig recommendation, I own a Yaesu 7800R which I like very much.  It is not too expensive, even brand new.  Also, if you wanted to get an HT (hand-held) I also recommend the Yaesu VX-6R which I also have and like.  However, there are a lot of good rigs out there, I assume you are reading the reviews here.
Logged
KA4HWX
Member

Posts: 28




Ignore
« Reply #3 on: January 07, 2007, 09:34:23 AM »

If you want a radio that you will not have to upgrade when you upgrade, get one like the Yaesu FT-857.

It works HF, VF, and UHF.

That way you can just upgrade the antenna system to work HF after you upgrade.

73
John
Logged
LASER529
Member

Posts: 16


WWW

Ignore
« Reply #4 on: January 07, 2007, 06:24:41 PM »

Thanx for the info. I was wondering if the ft-897 would be a better for the money or does it just have extra stuff that I would prolly never use?
Logged
LASER529
Member

Posts: 16


WWW

Ignore
« Reply #5 on: January 10, 2007, 01:52:17 AM »

I also have a varmint xL 1000 amp. C an i use this with a ham radio, also would it cause interference with the neibors?
Logged
KG4RUL
Member

Posts: 3354


WWW

Ignore
« Reply #6 on: January 10, 2007, 05:17:19 AM »

"I also have a varmint xL 1000 amp. C an i use this with a ham radio, also would it cause interference with the neibors?"

NO and YES
Logged
KD0FC
Member

Posts: 40




Ignore
« Reply #7 on: January 10, 2007, 04:14:44 PM »

Please, sell the Varmit to one of the 11 meter guy's, even though it's illegal, it's never stopped them before! If you do plan to work VHF/UHF/HF, then the recommendations from some are valid...an IC-746, FT-857/897/847, TS-2000, etc. are all options. If you're like me and don't have MD, DDS, Ph D, etc. after your name, then you have to find what will fit your budget!   Best of luck...
Logged
N5EAT
Member

Posts: 175




Ignore
« Reply #8 on: January 17, 2007, 12:34:15 PM »

The 857 and 897 are electrically identical.  However, the 897 has bigger buttons, and slots for 2 internal batteries or an internal power supply.  It has provisions for a bolt-on antenna tuner (I have the LDG version - it works very well).  It also has a carrying handle.

I've had the original 857 for about 4 years and it's a GREAT mobile radio and has generally excellent DSP filtering.  

Also, you don't need a special antenna to work VHF/UHF sideband.  It would be nice to have a huge yagi for 2 meters, a nice vertical antenna will do double duty as fm/ssb antenna.
Logged
LASER529
Member

Posts: 16


WWW

Ignore
« Reply #9 on: January 19, 2007, 03:58:52 PM »

I think i'm going to go with the 897d model. what other epuipment will i need for use in the home(apartment) and the car for mobile operation.
Logged
N5EAT
Member

Posts: 175




Ignore
« Reply #10 on: January 29, 2007, 11:45:27 PM »

You will need a 20 amp power supply.

You can make a good 2 meter dipole with whatever length piece of coax you want, with a 19 inch piece of wire connected to the center, another 19 inch piece of wire connected to the braid.   You can tape this antenna on the wall if you wish.  Just run the coax away from the antenna 90 at right angles to the 19 in pieces of wire.

You can get a 2 meter/440mhz mag mount antenna and mount it on your refrigerator if you like.  It will work pretty well.   You can also get a mag mount with a 3/8 by 24 mount and get a whip for 6 meters.  You can spend a bit of money and get a 6/2/440 tri band antenna and it will work well.   The mount and antenna could run you 150 to 200 bucks.

You can get a good Wilson CB antenna and cut a few inches off to use on 10 meters.  Wilson should be able to give you a good idea as to how much to trim.

Power supply, coax, various antennas.
Logged
Pages: [1]   Go Up
  Print  
 
Jump to:  

Powered by MySQL Powered by PHP Powered by SMF 1.1.11 | SMF © 2006-2009, Simple Machines LLC Valid XHTML 1.0! Valid CSS!