Call Search
     

New to Ham Radio?
My Profile

Community
Articles
Forums
News
Reviews
Friends Remembered
Strays
Survey Question

Operating
Contesting
DX Cluster Spots
Propagation

Resources
Calendar
Classifieds
Ham Exams
Ham Links
List Archives
News Articles
Product Reviews
QSL Managers

Site Info
eHam Help (FAQ)
Support the site
The eHam Team
Advertising Info
Vision Statement
About eHam.net

donate to eham
   Home   Help Search  
Pages: Prev 1 [2] 3 Next   Go Down
  Print  
Author Topic: What to expect with ALS-600 ?  (Read 14418 times)
KH6AQ
Member

Posts: 7776




Ignore
« Reply #15 on: January 21, 2011, 05:55:41 PM »

I too have an ALS-600. After having tube amps I would never go back to those unreliable things. I drive the ALS-600 with 50-60 watts and get 500 to 600 watts output on CW.
Logged
N0AZZ
Member

Posts: 0




Ignore
« Reply #16 on: January 22, 2011, 03:31:21 AM »

I have read what you have posted about your antenna but get a grip there are antennas you can use that are hands down better than a G5RV. The single most important part of your station is the antennas they are number ONE! You have a very good radio with a good receiver but an El cheapo radio with a good antenna will out preform yours with a easy Antennas, Antennas, Antennas.

Please try to improve the antenna first then go on to other things I did have a LDG-1000 Pro for about 3 weeks then sold it it sounded like you were shaking a can with marbles in it when tuning each to his own. At the same time I had a ALS-600 it was OK but had to go back to MFJ for repairs after 3 mo. Before that I had 2 other amps a legal limit and a AL-80B sold them also. Then several years ago I bought a Yaesu VL-1000 amp the best thing since sliced bread if you run Yaesu equipment everything is automatic and at 1k 6-160m.

Most of my antennas are resonant except for 80m at band edges and most of 160m for those I use a Palstar manual tuner the rest are taken care of by the tuner in the amp.

I work most of my DX using just the radio (200w) the times I use the amp is when the contact has a poor antenna and is deaf then I go QRO to make the contact most of those a poor antennas and a lot of the time a 100w mobile type radio. Take the advice of other posters.


There are many here that
Logged
AD5X
Member

Posts: 1621




Ignore
« Reply #17 on: January 22, 2011, 04:52:56 AM »

I've had an ALS-600 for about four years.  Works great, and never a problem.  I had an AL-80B several years ago, and that was a fine amplifier as well.  However, while the ALS-600 amp is more expensive than the AL-80B, I love the convenience of no-tuning.  I won't ever go back to a tube amp.  I use an MFJ-998 auto-tuner with my amp.

Phil - AD5X
Logged
AB4ZT
Member

Posts: 73




Ignore
« Reply #18 on: January 22, 2011, 06:34:34 AM »

I am going to chime in here and concur with a couple others and encourage you to re-evaluate your antenna situation.  I, too, live in a neighborhood that you would think would generally be sensitive to towers/antennae.  We even have an HOA here.  But, there are no deed restrictions against outdoor antennae, and no zoning issues either.  A few years ago I put up a roof-top tower and have on it a Mosley tri-bander - topping out at about 35 feet.  Was I worried about neighbor complaints?  Well, yes I was actually.  Here is the tally so far:

Complaints about antenna:  0

Complaints about RFI:  0

To be sure, it helps to be on friendly terms with your immediate neighbors.  Get to know them.  However, if there are no HOA or zoning issues, DO NOT ASK THEIR PERMISSION.  You are only asking for negative reactions if you do that.  If you are in the clear legally, just put it up (legally), and if you are on good terms with your neighbors you will likely hear nothing about it.

Trust me, as someone who went from a vertical to a modest tri-bander, once you have the beam in the air you will be asking yourself "Where have I been all my life?".  The difference will be that profound.

Now, you may be in a situation where you know that if you put up a beam you are going to get grief and you just don't have the stomach for conflict.  That is understandable and if that is where you are so be it.  At least you have a decent wire in the air.  I would just suggest to survey the situation completely to be sure it is that bad before giving up on a better antenna.

In any case - good luck and have fun.

73,

Richard
Logged
WB4AUW
Member

Posts: 44




Ignore
« Reply #19 on: January 22, 2011, 06:57:30 AM »

You would be amazed what you could do with a hex-beam on  a push up pole. Add the amp and you'd really be happy.
Logged
WA7PRC
Member

Posts: 2319


WWW

Ignore
« Reply #20 on: January 22, 2011, 02:03:01 PM »

After having tube amps I would never go back to those unreliable things.
Unreliable? My SB-220 lasted 30 years (with almost daily use) into antennas that weren't always 50Ω ±j0.  Loss of cooling finally did some damage but I was up & running again quickly and with reasonable cost. I would never use a solid state amplifier, and have to make my antennas look like 50Ω ±j0 (or use a tuner).  Just my 2¢ worth.
Logged
W8JX
Member

Posts: 13268




Ignore
« Reply #21 on: January 22, 2011, 03:28:23 PM »

Unreliable? My SB-220 lasted 30 years (with almost daily use) into antennas that weren't always 50Ω ±j0.  Loss of cooling finally did some damage but I was up & running again quickly and with reasonable cost. I would never use a solid state amplifier, and have to make my antennas look like 50Ω ±j0 (or use a tuner).  Just my 2¢ worth.

I agree. I think those that have trouble with tube amps never learn how to use them properly or even over drive them too. While I have had my Dentron amp for a mere 17 years, it was used when I got it and other than retubing it 16 years ago (finals were soft) and cleaning the ant/change over relay few times it has been trouble free.  Solid state amps are getting better but they are not there yet and still pretty pricey per watt too.
Logged

--------------------------------------
Ham since 1969....  Old School 20wpm REAL Extra Class..
KD8MJR
Member

Posts: 5533




Ignore
« Reply #22 on: January 22, 2011, 06:45:48 PM »

Hi Gary

I have seen that you have gotten a lot of good advice from various Hams, don't ever take it for granted when someone takes the time to type back a one page response to your questions, it's truly a nice thing that those people are doing.

I have almost the identical setup to yours, I am using a G5RV along with a 756Pro3 and a 750 watt Tokyo Hy-Power Amp, added to that is an LDG-1000Pro which I find to be an excellent tuner. Once programmed it only takes about 2 seconds to lock onto a 1.3 SWR.

I have been up and running for 14 months and in that time I have worked about 170 countries including Antarctica, Australia, Alaska, Mongolia, most of Europe, Iceland, Falkland Islands, South Korea and a whole bunch more and all with my G5RV. 

What most of the Guys are telling you is Dead on, even though I have worked all these countries I am constantly reminded that my Antenna is really not all that good, it just works OK and can do a sufficient Job when the Propagation is good and added to that I have developed a serious amount of Patience to wait until the pile ups subside or better yet always scanning the bands to get there first Smiley

THE IMPORTANT PART:
Even when you pump 600 watts into your Antenna, it's only boosting your Tx, it of course has no bearing on your receive, so an Amp is not going to make you hear any better than you are right now and that my friend is the thing that is always going to frustrate you in the future when you hear people calling to Dx and you cant hear a thing.  The second issue is one that everyone has said before, you will get out much better with a directional antenna because a fixed G5RV or Dipole is only really effective in two directions, so in the other two directions your signal even with an Amp running is probably worst than if you rotated the Dipole 90 deg and turned off the Amp.

I have the same issue like you, I did not want to rock the apple cart in my neighborhood and put up a big old Antenna that was probably going to create a whole bunch of problems, but I can tell you that after getting to 170 countries I realized that I cannot go any further on a G5RV so I decided to rethink the Game and look at how I could get a descent Antenna in with Minimal visual impact, what I decided on was a 3 element Steppir, in your case maybe a 2 element Steppir could be nestled between trees and just poke its head over the trees, believe me if its only 4 feet above the Tree tops it will not look all that obvious. Just do the install during the Weekdays like on a Monday when everyone is at work and watch how few people even notice it went up.

In any case whatever you decide to do, I can Guarantee you that if you do fall in love with Ham Radio you will always be seeking to get out further and at some point in time that 600 watt amp will become a 1.5kw and that G5RV will be replaced! When you do it you will wonder why you never did it before.

All the Best
Robert
Logged

“A lie can travel half way around the world while the truth is putting on its shoes.”  (Mark Twain)
KD8IIC
Member

Posts: 786




Ignore
« Reply #23 on: January 23, 2011, 02:23:52 AM »

ALS-600 is a good choice,good first timer,rugged,mine's still working fine.There is a learning curve involved to set up your TX audio so as not too splatter.Getting that right is job one/primary task. Have fun with it... Cheesy
Logged
KD8PGB
Member

Posts: 142




Ignore
« Reply #24 on: January 23, 2011, 02:46:04 AM »


 I do very much appreciate the various responses, all good information for a new ham and I would have to agree with one of the posts, the antenna will at some point become my anchor and I will have to go with some rotatable beams but for now it is what it is and in many cases I can hear contacts that are within my lobes but I can't break through to them or I am down in the noise floor. Over the next week or so I will get an amp and find out first hand the impact on those types of contacts.

Thanks to all !

Dan KD8PGB
Logged
AD4U
Member

Posts: 2537




Ignore
« Reply #25 on: January 23, 2011, 05:15:33 AM »

It is the same old adage that has been repeated thousands of times.  "If you can't hear them, you can't work them". 

Even though the guy on the "other end" will hear you about one S unit louder with an amp, you won't hear him any better than you do now.  An amp will only help you work what you can hear. 

On the other hand having a yagi will enable you to hear the other guy much better while enabling him to hear you much better, while nulling the QRM from every other direction.

This will allow you to hear MANY more stations than you hear now.  When (if) you finally put up a yagi, the only thing you will wonder is "why did I wait so long".

Dick  AD4U
Logged
KH6AQ
Member

Posts: 7776




Ignore
« Reply #26 on: January 23, 2011, 06:47:13 AM »

Because an 80 meter Yagi is difficult to install? An amp improves all bands. A triband Yagi improves only three bands.

KD8PGB says he has maxed out his antenna given his circumstances. It's now time for an amplifier and the ALS-600 is a good one.
Logged
AD4U
Member

Posts: 2537




Ignore
« Reply #27 on: January 23, 2011, 07:33:22 AM »

Because an 80 meter Yagi is difficult to install? An amp improves all bands. A triband Yagi improves only three bands.

KD8PGB says he has maxed out his antenna given his circumstances. It's now time for an amplifier and the ALS-600 is a good one.



Where in his orignal post did he mention 80 meters?

Dick  AD4U
Logged
KH6AQ
Member

Posts: 7776




Ignore
« Reply #28 on: January 23, 2011, 07:38:59 AM »

He has a G5RV. That covers 80-10 meters.
Logged
ES1TU
Member

Posts: 293


WWW

Ignore
« Reply #29 on: January 25, 2011, 07:36:59 AM »

I think you may be imagining problems that would never happen.  Either that, or it's a really unusual neighborhood where people would complain about the color of your trash cans, a dog that might bark, and lots of other things. Cheesy

We are in the same boat Wink
I started with an AL80B and a vertical antenna. In few months I learned that you can push 800w into a vertical, but it's very hard to work dx with an inefficient antenna. Half a year I walked home pondering "how terrible/not terrible" would a lightweight beam look on my roof. Then one day I decided "what a heck..one day we all die and then it would be too late to regret about living a life without a beam". My moxon will have it's first birthday this March. Yes, some people walking the street rise their eyes probably thinking "what the heck is that". During this first year, only one neighbor once asked "are you listening voice of america with that thing".

It's absolutely amazing what those two rotatable wires up at 48ft can do.
During last month I worked 3 stations from Antarctica. This is something I could never do with my previous antenna. Perhaps even with few kw-s.

I enjoy this hobby so much that I really don't care what those people passing my house might or might not think. Looking back I must admit that my biggest obstacle was in my head. I think that in reality neighbors have their own issues and problems to take care of so they don't really give a big deal about someones odd looking antenna.

And oh..last xmas I bought my first cw paddle. I don't even start to describe how does this combo "CW->800w->2el beam" feels on the air Wink
Logged
Pages: Prev 1 [2] 3 Next   Go Up
  Print  
 
Jump to:  

Powered by MySQL Powered by PHP Powered by SMF 1.1.11 | SMF © 2006-2009, Simple Machines LLC Valid XHTML 1.0! Valid CSS!