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Author Topic: Portable Inverter Generator Hash help?  (Read 11283 times)
KE4NU
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« on: March 26, 2011, 03:45:55 PM »

Hi all, I just purchased one of these new portable 2kw inverter generators. Works good except..I can not hear any hf radio, terrible hash on receive. Has someone dealt with this before? I can't use it for field day if I can't reduce the hash. It's mostly transmitted through the extension cord. When unplugged a portable sw radio hardly hears any noise but plug it up the extension cord and wham!!. Any suggestion would be appreciated other than getting rid of it.. I'd have to get rid of the wife too..she likes it!! its very quite...thanks in advance es 73, Alan
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K1CJS
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« Reply #1 on: March 27, 2011, 08:32:17 AM »

These inverters work by rapidly inverting the DC to produce AC, changing the AC frequency and reconverting it to sixty cycle 110 volt AC.  If the inverter you have is a work grade inverter, that is an inverter meant to power hand tools or other non-interference restricted activities, you're out of luck.  Short of putting the inverter a distance away, enclosing it in a metal enclosure, and filtering the heck out of the output, there isn't a lot that you can do.  These inverters are noise generators, and there is no real way of getting around it short of getting a more expensive model that is better engineered and is sufficiently filtered.
« Last Edit: March 27, 2011, 08:34:54 AM by K1CJS » Logged
W8JX
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« Reply #2 on: March 27, 2011, 08:44:50 AM »

You might see if it is a option to return it as it really is not usable for one of the things you want to use it for.
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Ham since 1969....  Old School 20wpm REAL Extra Class..
WB6BYU
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« Reply #3 on: March 31, 2011, 07:22:41 PM »

We had that problem with a generator we were using for a weekend radio expedition.
We solved the problem by attaching it to a ground rod and adding a coiled 100'
extension cord as a choke.  Problem went away almost entirely.

There probably is some filtering that you can add internally or externally (a big RF choke
on the output, for example).  You might get by with a short extension cord wrapped
through a stack of snap-on choke cores, or something similar.
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AJ3O
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« Reply #4 on: March 31, 2011, 07:43:14 PM »

WB6BYU is right. On mine, just below the outlets, there is a grounding lug. Attach a cooper ground wire to the lug and connect it to a ground rod. Although, mine has never given me any problems even without a ground connected 95% of the time. I know, not smart...... Embarrassed
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K8KAS
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« Reply #5 on: April 11, 2011, 11:53:52 AM »

The generator inverter develops a Square Wave instead of a Sine Wave, the Square Wave generates ton's of interference and harmonics. I don't know what generator develops a true sine wave 120 volt AC , but I know it won't be cheap..73 Denny K8KAS
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KG4RUL
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« Reply #6 on: April 11, 2011, 05:00:36 PM »

My 700W Honda generator produces no significant hash.  Quality counts!
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NX8J
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« Reply #7 on: April 12, 2011, 01:32:46 PM »

Don't know what brand you have, but the Honda eu2000i we use makes a synthetic sine wave with little distortion, not a square wave. I have used it for QSO parties and such in the woods. Very quiet from an audible noise viewpoint. Some sparkplug hash if the radio is within a few feet of the unit. Place the generator 50-100 feet from your antennas. If you feel the interference is coming in on the AC cord, then run it through a Tripp-Lite or similar RFI filter, not just a surge arrestor which does nothing for hash. Good line filters usually weigh more than simple surge arrestors because the toroids and coiled wire inside are heavier than a varistor.
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W8JX
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« Reply #8 on: April 12, 2011, 02:31:32 PM »

My 700W Honda generator produces no significant hash.  Quality counts!

Quality can be cheap too. I have a 3000 watts generator I bought at Aldi's for 200 bucks 3 years ago on clearance. It makes no noise to speak of. (I know as I used it for 5 days during a extended power outage and it never missed a beat and withstood some pretty good overloads too).
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K3AN
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« Reply #9 on: May 04, 2011, 07:33:42 PM »

"I don't know what generator develops a true sine wave 120 volt AC , but I know it won't be cheap."

I bought one of those $129, 2-stroke, 900 Watt generators. It puts out a pretty nice sine wave. We've used it on two Field Days, running the full 24 hours, and no RFI whatsoever. We'll be using it again this year.

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W8JX
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« Reply #10 on: May 04, 2011, 07:43:38 PM »

"I don't know what generator develops a true sine wave 120 volt AC , but I know it won't be cheap."

I bought one of those $129, 2-stroke, 900 Watt generators. It puts out a pretty nice sine wave. We've used it on two Field Days, running the full 24 hours, and no RFI whatsoever. We'll be using it again this year.


I will give you a tip too. Use Amsoil 100 to 1 SYN oil in it (no I am not a amsoil dealer) I long fought using their 2 stroke oil on principle bit a few years ago I took plunge. I use it in chain saws, leaf blowers, 2 stroke snowblowers and snowmobiles. Engines run smoother and smoke very little if any too. The exhaust does smell a bit different too
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Ham since 1969....  Old School 20wpm REAL Extra Class..
WB4BYQ
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« Reply #11 on: May 05, 2011, 05:52:03 AM »

I would try a homemade common-mode filter with capacitors accross the line for filtering.  i have used the mfj unit on several filter cases and they worked. 

on the Amszoil two cycle oil 100 to 1.  i have used the oil for 34 years in the same chain saw and i have not changed the plug yet.  the plug stills looks clean and the saw will start and run very well. i have several quarts of the oil.

richard
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W8JX
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« Reply #12 on: May 05, 2011, 09:43:57 AM »


on the Amsoil two cycle oil 100 to 1.  i have used the oil for 34 years in the same chain saw and i have not changed the plug yet.  the plug stills looks clean and the saw will start and run very well. i have several quarts of the oil.


I was same way and was reluctant to change but syn oil in 2 stroke is a whole new game and more so than in a 4 stroke engine. They run smoother, idle better (do not tend to load up with extended idles either) and smoke is greatly reduced. BIG difference with 2 stroke snowmobiles!  I actually mix it about 80 to 85 to 1. Never going back to regular 2 stroke oil. I wish I had switched years ago. 
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Ham since 1969....  Old School 20wpm REAL Extra Class..
K3AN
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« Reply #13 on: May 08, 2011, 08:54:26 AM »

Question on Amsoil. My 2-stroke generator and my leaf blower manuals specify a 50:1 mix of fuel to oil. My chain saw manual specifies a 40:1 mix. What ratios should I use if I switch to Amsoil?

Does Amsoil recommend the higher ratios instead of the ones called for in the manuals?

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W8JX
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« Reply #14 on: May 08, 2011, 11:03:24 AM »

Question on Amsoil. My 2-stroke generator and my leaf blower manuals specify a 50:1 mix of fuel to oil. My chain saw manual specifies a 40:1 mix. What ratios should I use if I switch to Amsoil?

Does Amsoil recommend the higher ratios instead of the ones called for in the manuals?


Amsoil makes a few different 2 stroke products. They make one called 100 to 1 that comes in packages sized for 1 gallon cans of gas. It has 1.5 oz of oil in them and it is actually 85 to 1.  I  mixed one package to .9 gallons of gas at first (approx 75 to 1) and used it in few 2 stroke snow blowers, a leaf blower and a chain saw. They all run great on it and chain saw idles so much smoother too and basically does not smoke. I now mix it in .95 gallons of gas.  These are all 50 to 1 rated engines. I bulk mix snomobiles at 60 to 1 from quart bottles of it.   (they are rated 40 to 1) and no problems and will try 70 to one next year.  

I was very leery to try this at first but my fears were unfounded. The SYN base stock properly lubes engine with a much leaner mixture. I honestly feel that if industry had pushed SYN oil in two strokes long ago there would have not been as a aggressive a effort to ban then in future because they smoke very little and run better too. I know a guy that runs restored old Massey Furgeson snomobiles that require 32 to 1 and he has been running AmsOil in them at about 60 to one now for a few years.  AmsOil makes a marine rated version too.
« Last Edit: May 08, 2011, 12:59:46 PM by W8JX » Logged

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Ham since 1969....  Old School 20wpm REAL Extra Class..
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