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Author Topic: Tokyo Hy-Power  (Read 1993 times)
N4KZ
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Posts: 711




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« on: April 25, 2006, 08:09:30 AM »

I keep hearing and reading that amplifier manufacturer Tokyo Hy-Power will soon re-enter the U.S.A market. But so far I've seen nothing concrete. Anyone know anything about this? THP sold some gear stateside several years ago but not their amps, as I recall. They make some good solid-state ones.
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K0BG
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« Reply #1 on: April 25, 2006, 08:14:03 AM »

The current FCC rules do not allow them for several reasons. The FCC has already announced they are changing the rules, and when they do, you'll see the THP stuff at all of the major players (AES, HRO, etc.) outlets.

The rules takes effect 30 days after it is first published in the Congressional Record, and that has not occurred. When and if it does appear, the news will be all over the net.

My guesstimate? Mid to late third quarter.

Alan, KØBG
www.k0bg.com
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AB2MH
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« Reply #2 on: April 25, 2006, 11:10:18 AM »

Why were they not allowed in the US?

Was it because their amps could be easily modified for 11 meter or CB use?
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WB2WIK
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Posts: 21837




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« Reply #3 on: April 25, 2006, 11:41:54 AM »

Amplifiers for amateur radio sold in the U.S. require FCC certification.  The manufacturer must take care of getting that done, or the product is not legal for sale here.

Certain "designs" would not be certifiable because they violate what's allowed by FCC regulations.  Those designs include amplifiers only requiring low drive to achieve rated output power; amplifiers capable of operating in the range of 12, 11, or 10 meters (and overlapping those bands); amplifiers that are "RF keyed" (thus capable of working without a dedicated amplifier keying line) and operating in the HF and low VHF spectrum -- all sorts of stuff.  The rules changes implemented more than 25 years ago now were to make it impossible for anyone to legally sell "CB" amplifiers here in the States.  At the same time, these rules outlawed the sale of many amateur amplifier designs (although anything could still be homebrewed or modified for personal amateur use, just not sold).

It's possible this law may be changed, and maybe even later this year.  Nobody can verify this until it happens.

WB2WIK/6

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K7PEH
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Posts: 1146




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« Reply #4 on: April 26, 2006, 04:06:21 PM »

A Question about those early CB restriction type FCC rules.

I can understand the desire to keep a big RF power amp away from those 18-wheeler guys and their CBs feeding their piddling whip antennas.

But, what about the guy with the CB base station running 5 watts into his 28 element 11-meter high-gain antenna.  This is legal, right?  I don't even know actually but if it is legal, does it not violate the FCC principle of limiting the effective RF of a CB station.

Then again, it is 11 meters and this is the low-side of the sunspot cycle.  Seems like all the power you use won't make that much difference if there is no skip anyway.  Or, if it is the high-side of the sunspot cycle, 5 watts is enough to work the world (so they say, I have never done it).
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K7VO
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Posts: 1014




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« Reply #5 on: April 27, 2006, 11:10:07 PM »

Tokyo Hy-Power Labs' negotiations with the company that was to be their U.S. distributor didn't work out.  THP will not be reentering the U.S. market any time soon.

A rather large number of hams have imported their amps after buying them factory direct.  The last clarification I have from the FCC (1/2001) is that the act of importing the amp does violate the rules but as a practical matter it is never enforced on a quantity of one.  Once the amp is here it is perfectly legal for you to use it since it meets all FCC rules for spectral purity, etc...  THP amps have excellent filtering and generally won't work on 11m without significant surgery.

It is NOT a violation to buy an amp already in the U.S. on the used market.

Those who have imported on the Tokyo Hy-Power mailing list report receiving their amps about a week after payment arrives in Tokyo.   THP's customer service is excellent.

The Tokyo Hy-Power mailing list is at http://groups.yahoo.com/group/tokyohypower

73,
Caity
K7VO
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