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Author Topic: Info on Standard Radio  (Read 5217 times)
KF7LCE
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Posts: 24




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« on: September 02, 2011, 08:17:40 PM »

I helped my grandmother clean up her place today, and one of the things I found was an old Standard multi-band receiver, model number RV-600. I frankly have no idea how to use the thing properly, but when I look up anything about it on Google, there are exactly zero hits. Where is a good source of information on old Standard radios? Does anybody have any knowledge or experience themselves with these types of receivers?

Thanks,

Derrick KF7LCE
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N4NYY
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Posts: 5224




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« Reply #1 on: September 04, 2011, 07:32:00 PM »

http://www.radiomuseum.org/dsp_hersteller_detail.cfm?company_id=5454

This is the only thing I could find, and you model is not listed.

BTW, you are out of luck. Last week, AC5UP threw one of these out.
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AA4HA
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Posts: 2630




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« Reply #2 on: September 07, 2011, 02:12:02 PM »

I had a VHF Standard, 64 channel radio back in the 80's. I encountered the "pay $5 a channel and we will add programming to it" BS so I opened the cover. All of the channel programming resided on a 27C16 EEPROM. I read the chip out and looked at it with a hex editor and it was very apparent of what made up the channel number, rx/tx frequencies and CTCSS (sub-tone) codes. I was able to reverse engineer what it would take to add/ change the channels and using a hex editor I created a new image for the 27C16 EEPROM. (I actually burned a new prom and left the old one alone in case I "screwed the pooch").

Never again did I have to deal with the $5 a channel folks. Nowadays I no longer have access to a PROM burner/reader and would even have to dig around for a hex editor.
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Ms. Tisha Hayes, AA4HA
Lookout Mountain, Alabama
AC5UP
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Posts: 4546




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« Reply #3 on: September 07, 2011, 02:33:50 PM »

Here's a better one for you...

Long ago in a place called the late 70's an oil company got into the office automation business. Primary product focus was on smart typewriters and word processors based on the Z-80. The typewriters featured a one line display in glorious dot-matrix LED that was scrollable, editable, and the machine could store something like six pages in RAM. Compose your letter and print as many copies as you needed. Watching it print was way cool because it was bi-directional. One line forward then one line backwards without a carriage return, proportional font daisy wheels were available and it could justify both margins.

At the time this was a mind blower and the machine was capable of outstanding document quality.

The typewriter came in three flavors: No magnetic storage (turn it off and it's wiped clean), 32 pages of magnetic storage, infinite magnetic storage. The difference between the last two was a floppy disk drive... The infinite storage model had a door on the drive allowing as many floppies as you wanted to be libraried and re-loaded at will. The 32 page model had the same floppy drive with one diskette factory installed and a blank plastic panel over the slot where the floppy drive door would go if you purchased that option. When the floppy was full you had to delete something before you could store something else.

The difference in price for the floppy door vs no-door model was something like $400............

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KD0FAT
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Posts: 68




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« Reply #4 on: September 08, 2011, 09:40:23 AM »

I found one schematic for a Standard Radio, Model 29 on the Nostalgia Air website. It's an old, early 1930's TRF design. Doesn't look like a multi-band design. I bet the company was one of the many small radio manufacturers that appeared and then went out of business in the 30's. How old is the model "RV-600" that you have? If it is multi-band, it sounds a bit newer and more sophisticated than the Model 29.   

Al
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KF7LCE
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« Reply #5 on: September 10, 2011, 01:07:31 PM »

I haven't seen a date (will have to go looking for it) but it advertises on the front that it has "Solid State Design". It's probably newer than the 1930s, though not by much
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AC5UP
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Posts: 4546




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« Reply #6 on: September 10, 2011, 01:27:44 PM »

Transistor radios became popular in the early 60's... Remember that the first transistors were AT&T lab items in the very early 50's.

As for this particular radio, that's Standard of Japan as in Standard / Vertex / Yaesu of today. Given the description I'd put it at late 60's to early 70's. If you open it up there might be a date code stamped somewhere which could be in the form of a number like " 7123 " which would be the 23rd week of 1971.

Since Standard (Japan) was never a common retail brand name in the US it wouldn't surprise me if that radio was purchased through a PX in Vietnam. Short Wave radios sell much better outside the US as the rest of the world doesn't have the density of local stations we do in the CONUS. Back in the late 40's / early 50's Zenith sold a buttload of Transoceanic 500's to servicemen in South Korea for the same reason. Something about listening to the VOA when you're that far from home is worth the money...........
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