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Author Topic: Background Radiation - Could It Be a Vexation ?  (Read 41596 times)
AF6LJ
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« Reply #45 on: October 26, 2011, 12:45:41 PM »

Getting back to the original discussion which I have been following with considerable interest.....

Large currents ether suddenly established or suddenly reduced to zero do move things, sometimes really big things. An arc in a vacuum will only make sound as the result of the mechanical force of the arc being conducted through the solid objects that make their way to the outside. What I can't buy into is on this planet with an abundance of life that there would be enough cosmic or any other radiation to cause any vacuum tube to arc internally. Stop and think about the number of not only electrons you have to dislodge but the number of ions free or otherwise that have to be created. A cloud of electrons by themselves won't cause the arc.
As soon as those electrons are dislodged they will be sucked up by the anode to be just another bit of noise in the system.

Here is a question for everyone;
How do we know that unexplainable arc (bang) isn't caused by VOCs (volatile Organic Compounds) in the air?


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W8JI
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« Reply #46 on: October 26, 2011, 01:51:31 PM »

Here is a question for everyone;
How do we know that unexplainable arc (bang) isn't caused by VOCs (volatile Organic Compounds) in the air?




We all know, or should know, it isn't radiation. That is physically impossible. We are left with things that cause a HV to ground fault.

I have tubes here that repeatedly will make a "big bang" because, when they fault, things inside the amp will jump around from the surge, relay contacts will arc, capacitors and chokes will make noise, and even the tubes will make a bang.

As a series resistance is added to the supply to limit fault current, the noise is greatly reduced.

There isn't anything magical or mysterious about this. Even the tube noise is not that strange. The anode in some tubes IS the outside of the tube, and in other tubes it connects through a large support stem. There are also supporting structures that anchor the elements in place.

Not only that, the noise can be replicated over and over again with some defective tubes. 50-200 amps as a 3000-6000 volt line pulls to ground moves many things, and can easily creates multiple external arc paths.


73 Tom

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AG6K
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« Reply #47 on: October 26, 2011, 03:02:55 PM »

Quote
AF6LJ
Susan A. Robins
   
RE: Background Radiation - Could It Be a Vexation ?
« Reply #48 on: Today at 12:45:41 PM »
   
Getting back to the original discussion which I have been following with considerable interest.....

Large currents ether suddenly established or suddenly reduced to zero do move things, sometimes really big things. An arc in a vacuum will only make sound as the result of the mechanical force of the arc being conducted through the solid objects that make their way to the outside
.

  Correctamundo

Quote
What I can't buy into is on this planet with an abundance of life that there would be enough cosmic or any other radiation to cause any vacuum tube to arc internally.

  Agreed Susan.  The tube does not arc when electrons are knocked loose by fleeting a high-energy photon, the tube simply conducts briefly.   The sudden flow of current pulses the current through the anode's parasitic parallel-resonance formed by the 4-1000A's 7pF anode-C, the lead L, the L/R VHF suppressor's L,  C-tune to gnd and back to the gnded-grids.  In a typical 4-1000A amplifier this resonance is typically near 85MHz. depending on layout.  Much in the same way that a spark transmitter generated RF, the I-pulse rings the parasitic resonance  and generates a VHF damped wave. .  If conditions are right, due to the feedback path in the 4-1000. it is sometimes possible for regeneration of the VHF signal to take place.  Since the 4-1000A's tank L is essentially a VHF RFC, the VHF energy being produced has no where to go so it runs amok before the L, possibly causing arcing, and big bangs. 

Quote
Stop and think about the number of not only electrons you have to dislodge but the number of ions free or otherwise that have to be created. A cloud of electrons by themselves won't cause the arc.
As soon as those electrons are dislodged they will be sucked up by the anode to be just another bit of noise in the system.

  sound analysis. 

Quote
Here is a question for everyone;
How do we know that unexplainable arc (bang) isn't caused by VOCs (volatile Organic Compounds) in the air?

    Volatile organic compounds that are often found in Ham radio stations - such as Jack Daniels - are insulators when in vapor form.
  A good clue as to the cause of the arc is the measured R of the VHF parasitic suppressor resistor: -- I.E., if the R has greatly increased and there is no sign of heat damage on the outside, odds are that the damage was due to brief burst of VHF energy.   If the suppressor R is okay, maybe the arc and big bang was due to fruit flies or moths?

cheers Susan
Rich, ag6k
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AG6K
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« Reply #48 on: October 26, 2011, 03:31:33 PM »

Quote
Quote from: AF6LJ, Susan A.  Today at 12:45:41 PM
Here is a question for everyone;
How do we know that unexplainable arc (bang) isn't caused by VOCs (volatile Organic Compounds) in the air?

Quote
We all know, or should know, it isn't radiation.

  Correct Mr. Rauch.  The only result of freeing electrons in the vicinity of +HV on the anode is a very brief flow of I in a tube that had been biased off.   If there happens to be a VHF  resonant circuit in the path of that pulse of current, does it seem possible that the circuit will ring and produce damped-wave VHF energy?255

Quote
That is physically impossible. We are left with things that cause a HV to ground fault.

I have tubes here that repeatedly will make a "big bang" because, when they fault, things inside the amp will jump around from the surge, relay contacts will arc, capacitors and chokes will make noise, and even the tubes will make a bang.

  If this was true then our physics class would have heard the alarm bell ringing loudly in the vacuum inside the bell jar. -- and we did not.   .  .  It's probably not good tor one's reputation to make stuff up in hopes of saving one's bacon.   

Quote
As a series resistance is added to the supply to limit fault current, the noise is greatly reduced.

There isn't anything magical or mysterious about this./quote]

  I know, it's what I have been saying since Oct. 1988.

Quote
[Even the tube noise is not that strange. The anode in some tubes IS the outside of the tube, and in other tubes it connects through a large support stem. There are also supporting structures that anchor the elements in place.

Not only that, the noise can be replicated over and over again with some defective tubes. 50-200 amps as a 3000-6000 volt line pulls to ground moves many things, and can easily creates multiple external arc paths

  The hydra grows more heads.  -  Rich, ag6k.

.
Quote
73 Tom
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G3TXQ
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Posts: 1845




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« Reply #49 on: October 27, 2011, 12:38:47 AM »

Rich,

I've been trying to follow this long-running thread, but it's now proving almost impossible because of your inability to structure responses. I'm totally confused as to who-said-what when I read your quotes.

Any chance you could get someone to give you a short lesson in how to do it properly?

Steve G3TXQ
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AG6K
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Posts: 1




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« Reply #50 on: October 27, 2011, 02:16:36 AM »

Quote
Rich,

I've been trying to follow this long-running thread, but it's now proving almost impossible because of your inability to structure responses. I'm totally confused as to who-said-what when I read your quotes.

Any chance you could get someone to give you a short lesson in how to do it properly?

Steve G3TXQ

  I've had lotsa help Steve.  Since clicking the Quote button seems to semi-consistently put everything in blue, I stopped using it.  Currently I copy the text I wish to reply to, click REPLY, click the Insert Quote button and paste in the text I am replying to.  I start my replies with the bitten-apple character - which is shift-option k on an Apple computer.  I put insert quote marks before and after each of my replies.   Any suggestions?  tnx
Rich, ag6k
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G3TXQ
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Posts: 1845




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« Reply #51 on: October 27, 2011, 02:22:39 AM »

Any suggestions?

Yes - use the Preview option to check that it looks OK before submitting; and always ensure that your comments appear outside any quoted section - that way it's clear what is the new contribution to the discussion.

73,
Steve G3TXQ
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AF6LJ
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Posts: 1




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« Reply #52 on: October 27, 2011, 09:33:04 AM »


    Volatile organic compounds that are often found in Ham radio stations - such as Jack Daniels - are insulators when in vapor form.
  A good clue as to the cause of the arc is the measured R of the VHF parasitic suppressor resistor: -- I.E., if the R has greatly increased and there is no sign of heat damage on the outside, odds are that the damage was due to brief burst of VHF energy.   If the suppressor R is okay, maybe the arc and big bang was due to fruit flies or moths?

cheers Susan
Rich, ag6k

The JD experiment maybe worth trying.

If there is an arc that cannot be explained by some issue with the design of the amplifier itself and cannot be repeated consistently then ether the environment the amplifier is operating in is the cause or some electrical transient exists on the AC mains feeding the amplifier.

I once worked for a company that made microprocessor vending machines, every once and a while a machine would crash and the watch dog timer would take it out of service. Two months later the cause was traced down to a dirty motor in the plant which generated a spike on the circuit shared with final test. Aggressive primary filtering cured the problem.

In electronics there are no unexplainable, random faults; there are simply conditions and causes that are overlooked. 
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AG6K
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« Reply #53 on: October 27, 2011, 10:37:40 AM »

Quote
The JD experiment maybe worth trying.

  chortle.

Quote
If there is an arc that cannot be explained by some issue with the design of the amplifier itself and cannot be repeated consistently then ether the environment the amplifier is operating in is the cause or some electrical transient exists on the AC mains feeding the amplifier.

  which assumes there is no such thing as background radiation.   However, I know that the next time I drive my Prius it's possible that the computer which controls the gas engine throttle may have an anomaly and I will have to pullover and reboot.  Forrest Gump was right about feces Susan

Quote
I once worked for a company that made microprocessor vending machines, every once and a while a machine would crash and the watch dog timer would take it out of service. Two months later the cause was traced down to a dirty motor in the plant which generated a spike on the circuit shared with final test. Aggressive primary filtering cured the problem.

In electronics there are no unexplainable, random faults; there are simply conditions and causes that are overlooked. 

  assuming there are no photons more energetic than UV.
Rich, ag6k
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AF6LJ
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« Reply #54 on: October 27, 2011, 11:34:53 AM »


If there is an arc that cannot be explained by some issue with the design of the amplifier itself and cannot be repeated consistently then ether the environment the amplifier is operating in is the cause or some electrical transient exists on the AC mains feeding the amplifier.
Quote
  which assumes there is no such thing as background radiation.   However, I know that the next time I drive my Prius it's possible that the computer which controls the gas engine throttle may have an anomaly and I will have to pullover and reboot.  Forrest Gump was right about feces Susan

Actually you won't have to pullover and reboot, the computer's watchdog timer will reboot for you.
Background radiation is a fact of life what we are debating is the amount of energy in the background radiation that makes it way though the atmosphere without loosing some or all of that potential to then make it's way through the building housing the amplifier then through the cabinet through a layer of ceramic (or glass) and still have enough energy to free up enough ions to cause an arc.
(sorry for the run on sentence.)

We do experience on a semi-regular basis cosmic ray bursts. In the Internet age such an occurrence as you described could be linked to such a radiation burst if that was indeed the cause. Neutrinos pass though this planet and everything on it daily and are so small the are not disruptive. It is believed this planet has experienced cosmic ray bursts that may be responsible for at least one mass extinction.

I can't quite buy into this theory without some data showing a link between background radiation and a failure mode like this.

Quote
I once worked for a company that made microprocessor vending machines, every once and a while a machine would crash and the watch dog timer would take it out of service. Two months later the cause was traced down to a dirty motor in the plant which generated a spike on the circuit shared with final test. Aggressive primary filtering cured the problem.

In electronics there are no unexplainable, random faults; there are simply conditions and causes that are overlooked. 
  assuming there are no photons more energetic than UV.
Rich, ag6k

I don't have any problem with the existence of high energy photons. One of my best friends has a degree in nuclear engineering. when we are not talking about our pets, cloths, houseplants boyfriends or the rest of that stuff we do talk about science and technology related topics.

I have to say that being a woman who is immersed in computer technology your theory would hold much more water had I seen unexplainable crashes in my PCs. They simply don't behave that way. The computer I am currently using runs Windows XP, the motherboard is twelve years old and the number of times this computer has crashed I can count on one hand, all of which had documentable causes. Of the four computers in this house not a single one has just crashed.

It would be reasonable to expect given a large enough solar or extra-solar event bathing this planet in high energy photons and other forms of ionizing radiation that electronic equipment not sufficiently shielded would incur soft or hard failure.

With that said, thank God for Watch Dog Timers and sensible engineering practice.
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AG6K
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« Reply #55 on: October 27, 2011, 07:45:34 PM »

Quote
Quote from: AG6K on Today at 10:37:40 AM

Quote
Susan:  If there is an arc that cannot be explained by some issue with the design of the amplifier itself and cannot be repeated consistently then ether the environment the amplifier is operating in is the cause or some electrical transient exists on the AC mains feeding the amplifier.

Quote  which assumes there is no such thing as background radiation.   However, I know that the next time I drive my Prius it's possible that the computer which controls the gas engine throttle may have an anomaly and I will have to pullover and reboot.  Forrest Gump was right about feces Susan


Quote
Actually you won't have to pullover and reboot, the computer's watchdog timer will reboot for you.

•  Actually I have to pull the Prius  over, shut down and reboot. 


Quote
Background radiation is a fact of life what we are debating is the amount of energy in the background radiation that makes it way though the atmosphere without loosing some or all of that potential to then make it's way through the building housing the amplifier then through the cabinet through a layer of ceramic (or glass) and still have enough energy to free up enough ions to cause an arc.
(sorry for the run on sentence.)]

•   Backup.  High-energy photons such as gamma and cosmic rays do not cause an arc, they can knock electrons loose inside the electron tube.  The footloose electrons are attracted by  the positive HV on the anode - thereby causing a brief flow of current.  This pulse of current rings the anode's VHF self resonance, the internal feedback-C feeds back some of the VHF energy and if there is enough VHF amplifying ability, regeneration takes place.  Because VHF can not pass throuh a Low Pass output matching network, the VHF energy runs amok and fireworks happen. 

[quoteWe do experience on a semi-regular basis cosmic ray bursts. In the Internet age such an occurrence as you described could be linked to such a radiation burst if that was indeed the cause. Neutrinos pass though this planet and everything on it daily and are so small the are not disruptive. It is believed this planet has experienced cosmic ray bursts that may be responsible for at least one mass extinction.

I can't quite buy into this theory without some data showing a link between background radiation and a failure mode like this
Quote
.

•  Are the Northern lights / aurora borealis and Southern lights / aurora australis a Norse myth?

Quote
I don't have any problem with the existence of high energy photons. One of my best friends has a degree in nuclear engineering. when we are not talking about our pets, cloths, houseplants boyfriends or the rest of that stuff we do talk about science and technology related topics.

I have to say that being a woman who is immersed in computer technology your theory would hold much more water had I seen unexplainable crashes in my PCs. They simply don't behave that way. The computer I am currently using runs Windows XP, the motherboard is twelve years old and the number of times this computer has crashed I can count on one hand, all of which had documentable causes. Of the four computers in this house not a single one has just crashed.

It would be reasonable to expect given a large enough solar or extra-solar event bathing this planet in high energy photons and other forms of ionizing radiation that electronic equipment not sufficiently shielded would incur soft or hard failure.

•  How does one shield against against gamma and cosmic rays ?  Rich, ag6k

Quote
With that said, thank God for Watch Dog Timers and sensible engineering practice.
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QRP4U2
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Posts: 262




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« Reply #56 on: October 27, 2011, 09:21:21 PM »

Quote
whether or not an x-ray of gamma-ray photon could knock an electron loose inside a 3-500Z or 572B and cause conduction to take place?  

I think you would need an intense burst of photons at just the correct frequency to do that. Plus, the metal surfaces being irradiated need to be highly polished, and tube plates are not.

Photoelectric Effect: The electron energy 1/2mV^2 has to equal (hXFp - W), where the work function of the metal is W and Fp is the frequency of the photon, and h is Plancks constant. So for an electron to move away from the plate, an intense burst of radiation at just the right frequncy would have to occur, and overcome the cathode to anode potential, which is postive and would have much greater energy than the photoelectron. So this scenario is highly improbable.

Geiger-Mueller Effect: In a Geiger counter, just the right kind of gas is needed to cause an avalance effect under a high potential.

Apples and oranges.

Phil - AC0OB
« Last Edit: October 27, 2011, 09:25:45 PM by QRP4U2 » Logged

AC0OB - A Place Where Thermionic Emitters Rule!
--------------------------------------------------------------------
Besides, when you're a Ham, you experiment with and improve boat anchors - that's what you do!. Smiley
AF6LJ
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« Reply #57 on: October 27, 2011, 09:40:54 PM »

Quote
Quote from: AG6K on Today at 10:37:40 AM

Quote
Susan:  If there is an arc that cannot be explained by some issue with the design of the amplifier itself and cannot be repeated consistently then ether the environment the amplifier is operating in is the cause or some electrical transient exists on the AC mains feeding the amplifier.

Quote  which assumes there is no such thing as background radiation.   However, I know that the next time I drive my Prius it's possible that the computer which controls the gas engine throttle may have an anomaly and I will have to pullover and reboot.  Forrest Gump was right about feces Susan


Quote
Actually you won't have to pullover and reboot, the computer's watchdog timer will reboot for you.

•  Actually I have to pull the Prius  over, shut down and reboot. 
So you are telling me the computer in your car crashes?
Never heard of a Prius doing this, I take it the dealer has had the car and I must assume they can't fix it.
Well that makes two examples of bad Japanese engendering I have seen in the last two weeks.
At least I can fix the faulty voltage regulator design in my FTDX-400.
That's one car I won't be caught riding in. 

Quote
Background radiation is a fact of life what we are debating is the amount of energy in the background radiation that makes it way though the atmosphere without loosing some or all of that potential to then make it's way through the building housing the amplifier then through the cabinet through a layer of ceramic (or glass) and still have enough energy to free up enough ions to cause an arc.
(sorry for the run on sentence.)]
Quote
•   Backup.  High-energy photons such as gamma and cosmic rays do not cause an arc, they can knock electrons loose inside the electron tube.  The footloose electrons are attracted by  the positive HV on the anode - thereby causing a brief flow of current.  This pulse of current rings the anode's VHF self resonance, the internal feedback-C feeds back some of the VHF energy and if there is enough VHF amplifying ability, regeneration takes place.  Because VHF can not pass throuh a Low Pass output matching network, the VHF energy runs amok and fireworks happen. 

With all due respect how many electrons do you believe are dislodged when this event occurs?
Secondly if an amplifier design is that close to self oscillation at any frequency the engineer should be fired.  I would love to see just one documented case of this happening. I'm sorry I can't buy into this the number of things that would have to go wrong and the amount high energy photons that would have present are very hard to believe. If you have documentation you can point me to I would love to see it.

Quote
We do experience on a semi-regular basis cosmic ray bursts. In the Internet age such an occurrence as you described could be linked to such a radiation burst if that was indeed the cause. Neutrinos pass though this planet and everything on it daily and are so small the are not disruptive. It is believed this planet has experienced cosmic ray bursts that may be responsible for at least one mass extinction.

I can't quite buy into this theory without some data showing a link between background radiation and a failure mode like this
Quote
.

•  Are the Northern lights / aurora borealis and Southern lights / aurora australis a Norse myth?
No and I know that because I have seen it first hand.
I also know those high energy particles are attracted to the poles by the Earth's magnetic field. the only time you see that stuff south of the forty-fifth parallel is when something really big hits us like the CME back in July of 1974 when I was living in central Oregon.

Quote
I don't have any problem with the existence of high energy photons. One of my best friends has a degree in nuclear engineering. when we are not talking about our pets, cloths, houseplants boyfriends or the rest of that stuff we do talk about science and technology related topics.

I have to say that being a woman who is immersed in computer technology your theory would hold much more water had I seen unexplainable crashes in my PCs. They simply don't behave that way. The computer I am currently using runs Windows XP, the motherboard is twelve years old and the number of times this computer has crashed I can count on one hand, all of which had documentable causes. Of the four computers in this house not a single one has just crashed.

It would be reasonable to expect given a large enough solar or extra-solar event bathing this planet in high energy photons and other forms of ionizing radiation that electronic equipment not sufficiently shielded would incur soft or hard failure.

•  How does one shield against against gamma and cosmic rays ?  Rich, ag6k

Quote
With that said, thank God for Watch Dog Timers and sensible engineering practice.
[/quote]

The Earth's atmosphere does block some gamma and cosmic rays. So does concrete and steel.
How much are you talking about?
How many high energy photons does it take to dislodge enough electron to create 40ma of current in the anode of a transmitting tube?

Can you post a link to any papers on this?
I honestly don't see this happening.
If you have an amplifier that is that close to instability simply turning it on would cause this to happen and it would be repeatable and the engineering deficiency could be corrected.
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AG6K
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« Reply #58 on: October 28, 2011, 03:34:22 AM »

Quote
AF6LJ
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RE: Background Radiation - Could It Be a Vexation ?
« Reply #57 on: Yesterday at 09:40:54 PM »
   
Reply with quoteQuote
Quote from: AG6K on Yesterday at 07:45:34 PM
Quote
Quote from: AG6K on Today at 10:37:40 AM

Quote
Susan:  If there is an arc that cannot be explained by some issue with the design of the amplifier itself and cannot be repeated consistently then ether the environment the amplifier is operating in is the cause or some electrical transient exists on the AC mains feeding the amplifier.

Quote  which assumes there is no such thing as background radiation.   However, I know that the next time I drive my Prius it's possible that the computer which controls the gas engine throttle may have an anomaly and I will have to pullover and reboot.  Forrest Gump was right about feces Susan


Quote
Actually you won't have to pullover and reboot, the computer's watchdog timer will reboot for you.

•  Actually I have to pull the Prius  over, shut down and reboot.

Quote
So you are telling me the computer in your car crashes?

  yes


Quote
Never heard of a Prius doing this, I take it the dealer has had the car and I must assume they can't fix it.

  it's been in twice for this.  However, it does it seldom, the fix is simple when it happens, and the Prius averages c. 52mpg. 

... ... ...

Quote
Background radiation is a fact of life what we are debating is the amount of energy in the background radiation that makes it way though the atmosphere without loosing some or all of that potential to then make it's way through the building housing the amplifier then through the cabinet through a layer of ceramic (or glass) and still have enough energy to free up enough ions to cause an arc.
(sorry for the run on sentence.)]
Quote
•   Backup.  High-energy photons such as gamma and cosmic rays do not cause an arc, they can knock electrons loose inside the electron tube.  The footloose electrons are attracted by  the positive HV on the anode - thereby causing a brief flow of current.  This pulse of current rings the anode's VHF self resonance, the internal feedback-C feeds back some of the VHF energy and if there is enough VHF amplifying ability, regeneration takes place.  Because VHF can not pass throuh a Low Pass output matching network, the VHF energy runs amok and fireworks happen.

Quote
With all due respect how many electrons do you believe are dislodged when this event occurs?

  I don't know.

Quote
Secondly if an amplifier design is that close to self oscillation at any frequency the engineer should be fired.  I would love to see just one documented case of this happening.

  If you have access to a spectrum analyzer, a tuning pulser, and a SB-220 or similar amplifier, you can observe the damped wave ringing in the anodes' VHF parasitic resonance (c. 110MHz for a SB-220).  This is signal that that initiates regeneration.  . 

Quote
I'm sorry I can't buy into this the number of things that would have to go wrong and the amount high energy photons that would have present are very hard to believe. If you have documentation you can point me to I would love to see it.

  I didn't believe it until I looked through a 75x microscope and saw a sea of gold meltballs inside a kaput 8874. 

Quote
We do experience on a semi-regular basis cosmic ray bursts. In the Internet age such an occurrence as you described could be linked to such a radiation burst if that was indeed the cause. Neutrinos pass though this planet and everything on it daily and are so small the are not disruptive. It is believed this planet has experienced cosmic ray bursts that may be responsible for at least one mass extinction.[/quote]

  So I've heard but I'm not quite old enough to have seen that one.

Quote
I can't quite buy into this theory without some data showing a link between background radiation and a failure mode like this
Quote

  The arc that makes the big bang is not a direct result of high energy photons knocking electrons around inside an electron tube, it's the sudden conduction of current through the VHF parasitic resonance that creates the damped wave VHF signal that regenerates and causes the arc in air that causes the big bang. - note - in a SB-220 this arc typically takes place between the anode heat radiator cap on V-2 and the perforated cover. 
.

Quote
•  Are the Northern lights / aurora borealis and Southern lights / aurora australis a Norse myth?

Quote
No and I know that because I have seen it first hand.
I also know those high energy particles are attracted to the poles by the Earth's magnetic field. the only time you see that stuff south of the forty-fifth parallel is when something really big hits us like the CME back in July of 1974 when I was living in central Oregon.
...... ...

Quote
It would be reasonable to expect given a large enough solar or extra-solar event bathing this planet in high energy photons and other forms of ionizing radiation that electronic equipment not sufficiently shielded would incur soft or hard failure.
[quote•  How does one shield against against gamma and cosmic rays ?  Rich, ag6k]

... ...

Quote
The Earth's atmosphere does block some gamma and cosmic rays. So does concrete and steel.

  Gamma-rays penetrate steel and lead.  Cosmic-rays penetrate this planet.


Quote
How much are you talking about?
How many high energy photons does it take to dislodge enough electron to create 40ma of current in the anode of a transmitting tube?

 I don't know.

Quote
Can you post a link to any papers on this?
I honestly don't see this happening.

  http://www.somis.org/8877-gs2.JPEG

 
Quote
If you have an amplifier that is that close to instability simply turning it on would cause this to happen and it would be repeatable and the engineering deficiency could be corrected.

  The trouble with intermittent VHF parasitic oscillations is that they are not very repeatable.  .  .  The TL-922 has a reputation for occasionally producing a big bang when its ZSAC drops to zero.  At first I thought this was impossible.  However, its the change in I that rings a resonant circuit, so it matters not whether the current went from zero to 180mA or it went from 180mA to 0nA,  either way there is going to briefly be a damped wave 120MHz signal in the 922's anode circuit.  Since there is c. 4300-ohms of XC between the out and in of the 3-500Zs at this freq. regeneration is probably not impossible.
Rich, ag6k
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AG6K
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« Reply #59 on: October 28, 2011, 04:20:40 AM »

Quote
Quote
whether or not an x-ray of gamma-ray photon could knock an electron loose inside a 3-500Z or 572B and cause conduction to take place? 

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I think you would need an intense burst of photons at just the correct frequency to do that. Plus, the metal surfaces being irradiated need to be highly polished, and tube plates are not.

  How could the exact frequency of a gamma-ray have anything to do with causing conduction Phil?

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Rich, ag6k
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