Call Search
     

New to Ham Radio?
My Profile

Community
Articles
Forums
News
Reviews
Friends Remembered
Strays
Survey Question

Operating
Contesting
DX Cluster Spots
Propagation

Resources
Calendar
Classifieds
Ham Exams
Ham Links
List Archives
News Articles
Product Reviews
QSL Managers

Site Info
eHam Help (FAQ)
Support the site
The eHam Team
Advertising Info
Vision Statement
About eHam.net

donate to eham
   Home   Help Search  
Pages: Prev 1 ... 13 14 15 16 17 [18] 19 20 21 Next   Go Down
  Print  
Author Topic: What was your first shortwave radio?  (Read 476470 times)
KA5ROW
Member

Posts: 579


WWW

Ignore
« Reply #255 on: March 10, 2018, 07:17:33 PM »

I re-tuned a transistor radio to the 41 meter band. I would listen to radio москва and others. But the tuning was a little  Different each night. only reason I knew it was on 41 meters some of the stations would say so. I did later buy a receiver that was ham band  only. I was about 16 Yr old.
Logged
N4OI
Member

Posts: 401




Ignore
« Reply #256 on: March 14, 2018, 05:35:00 AM »

I re-tuned a transistor radio to the 41 meter band. I would listen to radio москва and others. But the tuning was a little  Different each night. only reason I knew it was on 41 meters some of the stations would say so. I did later buy a receiver that was ham band  only. I was about 16 Yr old.

Similar experience when I was about 10 yrs old...  Tuned one of those rocket-shaped crystal sets and started getting Caribbean stations in Spanish...  Hooked!  Within a couple of years my dad graciously bought a National NC-60B receiver for me and the rest is history... Good times!

73   Roll Eyes
Logged
AB6RF
Member

Posts: 3




Ignore
« Reply #257 on: March 27, 2018, 05:23:45 PM »

I grew up in Finland, so Radio Moscow came in pretty strong , LOL!
Around 1978 my parent bought me a Selena B-212.
It was made-in-USSR transistor radio that covers SW/MW/LW bands, no SSB.
Man, that thing got me hooked.

Logged
KD5RYO
Member

Posts: 16


WWW

Ignore
« Reply #258 on: March 31, 2018, 12:22:27 PM »

  Mine was a Starlite A-120 (Hallicrafters S-120 clone).  What wonderful memories that radio brings back.

I had the S-120 but that was back in the 90s.  It was given to me as a restoration project and when I finished, they let me keep it.  I spent so many hours on that radio.  I wish I still had it.
Logged
WW7KE
Member

Posts: 946




Ignore
« Reply #259 on: March 31, 2018, 02:34:58 PM »

Mine was a Starlite A-120 (Hallicrafters S-120 clone).  What wonderful memories that radio brings back.

I had the S-120 but that was back in the 90s.  It was given to me as a restoration project and when I finished, they let me keep it.  I spent so many hours on that radio.  I wish I still had it.

The S-120 and the S-120A were two different radios. I owned the S-120A.

The S-120 was one of the last receivers built by Hallicrafters in Chicago before it was bought out by Northrop in 1966.  It used the late '50s-standard All-American Four (12BE6/12BA6/12AV6/50C5 plus selenium rectifier) circuit with shortwave and regenerative IF/BFO added.  Little different than the low-end Heathkit and Allied/Knight-kit receivers of the 1960s, except that the Allied unit did not have a BFO.

The S-120A was solid state, manufactured by Panasonic in Japan, and was sold under many different brand names, including Hallicrafters, Lafayette, and Midland.  It evolved into the S-125 in 1970 or '71, with only a few cosmetic changes and still putrid "performance."  It was gone, along with all other non-military products, when Northrop converted the Hallicrafters plant in Rolling Meadows IL to their Defense Systems Division in 1973.
Logged

He speaks fluent PSK31, in FT8...  One QSO with him earns you 5BDXCC...  His Wouff Hong has two Wouffs... Hiram Percy Maxim called HIM "The Old Man..."  He is... The Most Interesting Ham In The World!
AB6XV
Member

Posts: 1




Ignore
« Reply #260 on: April 04, 2018, 07:40:22 AM »

Honestly, I can't remember my first SW radio. However, I do remember winning it in a Cub Scout raffle around 1965. The antenna was not very good, and we lived in the middle of a large city. However, my father knew how to make a swl antenna (grew up in the '30's in Texas). He made an antenna which stretched from my bedroom window to the far end of our backyard. Then I started picking up a lot of stations. One of my favorite was "Radioooooo Havanaaaa!"... great music which I still love today. This was my start in swl and ham radio. I just couldn't believe I was listening to radio stations from other countries. I didn't know the languages of most countries, but was able to enjoy the music. Occasionally they would say something in English.

 A few years sater, through the Boy Scouts, and the communication merit badge, I was able to learn CW, pass my merit badge, then go down to the FCC and take the test for my amateur license. Boy was I proud waving that 'ticket' around the Boy Scout meeting. I honestly thank scout leader Clay Hanvey (USN radio operator- now SK) for directing me on this path of radio enjoyment through Amateur Radio.

'73
AB6XV
Logged
ONAIR
Member

Posts: 3735




Ignore
« Reply #261 on: April 05, 2018, 06:36:53 PM »

  Mine was a Starlite A-120 (Hallicrafters S-120 clone).  What wonderful memories that radio brings back.

I had the S-120 but that was back in the 90s.  It was given to me as a restoration project and when I finished, they let me keep it.  I spent so many hours on that radio.  I wish I still had it.
    I still have the Starlite A-120 buried in the attic somewhere!  It still worked the last time I tested it, about a decade ago!  Smiley
Logged
W2XQ
Member

Posts: 1


WWW

Ignore
« Reply #262 on: May 19, 2018, 06:04:47 PM »

In 1952 my first shortwave receiver was a 9-year-old Hallicrafters S-38. The first of a very popular series, it had two half-moon dials – tuning and bandspread – and a variable BFO. No power supply suggests it would be wise to use an isolation transformer for safety. Radio Australia, Radio Netherlands, the BBC, the VOA and the Armed Forces Radio Service were frequent visitors.

Next, the Magnavox RCU-2 was quite different from the receivers of the day. A floor console made of polished Mahogany, the left side top opened to access a record player. The right half was a huge half-moon dial with 3 bands to tune from 540 kHz to 18 MHz in AM mode only. A pair of 6L6 tubes drove audio to two huge 15-inch electromagnetic speakers. When the volume was turned up it could be heard a mile away. For use aboard Navy ships in WWII, the radio was highly shielded to prevent enemy submarines from picking up the inherent oscillator signals. Ten years after the end of the war, it took more than six months of back-and-forth correspondence with Magnavox, the Navy and the Library of Congress to first get the manual declassified and then get a photocopy.

In ~1956 a member of the Newark News Radio Club helped me in finding my third radio. The Hammarlund HQ-150 had a Barker & Williamson Model 370 SSB Receiving Adapter and a Heathkit SB-620 Panadapter attached to it. Of all the receivers, this is the probably the best I have ever owned for MW TA (trans-Atlantic) DXing. The bulk of the 90-odd countries heard between 520 and 1600 kHz were done so using this receiver. The 3-piece setup, with a box loop antennas, was the centerpiece of the receivers on the table into the mid-1970's.

The Hallicrafters 8R40, first built in 1953, was unique at the time for its additional coverage of 30 MHz to 50 MHz. The “beep-beep” of Sputnik – launching the space race – was heard on both 20 and 40 MHz. During the solar cycle peak of the late 1950's, including the International Geophysical Year, one could listen to the din of military, police and utility signals as the MUF (maximum usable frequency) climbed above the 10 meter amateur band toward 50 MHz. There was a BBC TV audio signal around 48 MHz, and that served as a green
light for 6 meters F2 propagation to Europe.

The first shortwave portable I owned was the venerable SONY ICF-2010. I still have the SONY ICF-SW7600GR. Nothing newer attracts my attention.
Logged
AB4KA
Member

Posts: 7




Ignore
« Reply #263 on: May 28, 2018, 05:14:21 PM »

Mine was a Hallicrafters S-53A.  My dad gave it to me in the summer of 1982, between my junior and senior years in high school. I did a lot of swl'ing that summer, then didn't do much for a few years, until 1987 when I got my ham ticket.  I still had it until about two years ago when it finally died.  I don't have the radio anymore, but I still have the original instruction manual for it.
Logged
DXACE1
Member

Posts: 3




Ignore
« Reply #264 on: May 30, 2018, 10:11:40 AM »

  Mine was a Starlite A-120 (Hallicrafters S-120 clone).  What wonderful memories that radio brings back.
After a Allied 2682 portable, I graduated to a Hammarlund HQ-180/A and Drake SPR-4
and never looked back.  Now have more radios than I can use, WJ, JRC, etc
Logged
KG4NEL
Member

Posts: 541




Ignore
« Reply #265 on: June 01, 2018, 01:13:50 PM »

Grundig YB400, around '99 or 2000.

Logged
N4NIV
Member

Posts: 12




Ignore
« Reply #266 on: June 03, 2018, 05:37:07 AM »

Hallicrafters S-53. It belonged to my father but he wasn't using it so around 1959-1960 he gave it to me and I put it on my  bedside table and hooked a short piece of wire to it. The shortwave bands were hopping in those days. So were the ham bands.

It worked up until about 10 years ago when I hooked up a multi long wire to it and started hearing sizzling sounds ... too much voltage I think ... so I turned the radio off and put it away.  It may still work but the original caps should definitely be replaced. I have the user's manual and schematic for it. I just have to find the time to work on it.

Logged
N3TPS
Member

Posts: 1




Ignore
« Reply #267 on: June 09, 2018, 02:44:15 AM »

I had an S-38 when I was a kid. At some point I got a BC-453 and fed the S-38 IF into the BC-453 for better selectivity. Plus I had my Mom's cathedral radio, which had a shortwave band.
Logged
WA2TPU
Member

Posts: 300




Ignore
« Reply #268 on: June 17, 2018, 02:43:20 PM »

My 1st was a like new boat anchor Hallicrafters SX-28 given to me by mentor and uncle John - K2TEE in 1960. Looking back what a decent receiver it was and such fond memories I have of those years listening to the shortwave bands.
Logged
NK7Z
Member

Posts: 2509


WWW

Ignore
« Reply #269 on: June 17, 2018, 03:25:22 PM »

My first was an HQ-110A, with the clock!  I am amazed I could even work anything on it after being spoiled on the rigs of today...
Logged

Thanks,
Dave
Amateur Radio: RFI help, Reviews, Setup information, and more...
https://www.nk7z.net
Pages: Prev 1 ... 13 14 15 16 17 [18] 19 20 21 Next   Go Up
  Print  
 
Jump to:  

Powered by MySQL Powered by PHP Powered by SMF 1.1.11 | SMF © 2006-2009, Simple Machines LLC Valid XHTML 1.0! Valid CSS!