Qwerty vs Dvorak vs Colemak

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Tom Alderman:
Yes, sometime around the late '70's I switched from QWERTY to Dvorak. At the time I could not type any faster than about 45 wpm on a QWERTY board; after about four months on the Dvorak I was up to about 60 wpm typing speed and eventually my top speed reached about 130 wpm. For those who don't know the difference between QWERTY and Dvorak, you should Google Dvorak and read the 'why' and the 'how' Professor Dvorak developed this board. In short, the QWERTY board was developed while the typewriter was being developed and at that time the connection between the keys and the platen was with very long wires. It did not take long for the ladies doing the typing test to become fast enough to constantly jam the keyboard. In order to slow these ladies down, the key placement was made such that it was the most inefficient finger to key movement that was possible and the most inefficient key placement possible is what most still use in the USA, probably because of our normal resistant to change! Example: with the QWERTY eight home keys, one can type about 90 words of the English language; with a Dvorak key placement board, with the eight home keys, one can type about 4000 words of the English language.
Caution! It is VERY difficult to switch between a Dvorak board and a QWERTY board. Dvorak boards are extremely difficult to find. However if your PC uses Windows, within Windows, you can switch your QWERTY board to a Dvorak board key placement.

73,
Tom - W4BQF

James F. Seibel:
Thank you W4BQF/Tom  for all that great information. You been a big help .

73 JIM

Sigurd Stenersen:
Quote from: W4BQF on February 28, 2012, 02:20:40 PM

In order to slow these ladies down, the key placement was made such that it was the most inefficient finger to key movement that was possible and the most inefficient key placement possible

That is urban myth.  The layout was designed to prevent jams while typing at speed.

73
LB3KB Sigurd
Just Learn Morse Code

James F. Seibel:
Quote from: LB3KB on February 23, 2012, 01:15:45 PM

Why not use Koch's method to become proficient at the keyboard ?  Just start at the speed you want to operate at, with only two characters.  Once you score 90% or better, add a character.  You should be able to progress quickly as you already know the code, and while you're getting better at the keyboard you're also practicing Morse code.

This would work for any keyboard layout, too.


73
LB3KB Sigurd
Just Learn Morse Code


Hi Sigurd ,

I agree with you that would be good practice to use Koch method to  get better with keyboard.

Seance Jan 1 of this year I have logged over 10,000 call signs between RufzXP / QRQ / CW Freak / Morse Runner/LCWO

On Feb 27 I made my highest score so far  on RufzXP but am sure I could do better. Like buying and using a straight key. Does one start with a straight key and never change or try to improve on sending speed and spacing ? A straight key is good for about 13 or 15 wpm I would guess . 

Yesterday I Made 18 attempts to break my record from Monday I logged  900 calls on RufzXP> I sure can still use the typing practice but that is really not the issue here.

 Just think, is that true what W4BQF says that you can type  90 words with Qwerty keyboard on  home row verses Dvorak home row of 4000 words. That is big difference. How much faster and smother Dvorak sounds. And what About Colemak keyboard layout ?

I guess the big question  is how much and how long is it going to take to RELEARN to type and is it worth it  ?

Of course with a straight key you can still use it and really can switch between bug , Iambic , keyboard to whatever . Not so IF I switch to faster better keyboard like Dvorak .

Thanks everyone for your input .

73 JIM

Tom Alderman:
 "In order to slow these ladies down, the key placement was made such that it was the most inefficient finger to key movement that was possible and the most inefficient key placement possible[/quote]

That is urban myth.  The layout was designed to prevent jams while typing at speed.

73
LB3KB Sigurd

Sigurd - Yes, you are correct about 'preventing jams' while typing at speed. If you re-read my post, that is exactly what I said. As to it being an 'urban myth', you had to have been there to know that?

Jim - Whether or not learning Dvorak is worth it, in my opinion, becomes pretty much a personal issue! To me, Dvorak, once you get used to the key placement, becomes extremely easy to use and over several hours of use your hands and especially your wrist are never fatigued. In the 70's into the late 90's I was doing QRQ CW, ofter over 100 wpm and I never could have had QSO's at those speeds without Dvorak. The major problem, if you let it become one, is that the majority of keyboards are the standard QWERTY and moving between QWERTY and Dvorak is not very easy. That I am aware, there is no company manufacturing Dvorak key placement keyboards. However MS Windows still provides you with an easy way to change your QWERTY board to a Dvorak board via internal software.
73,
Tom - W4BQF

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