Call Search
     

New to Ham Radio?
My Profile

Community
Articles
Forums
News
Reviews
Friends Remembered
Strays
Survey Question

Operating
Contesting
DX Cluster Spots
Propagation

Resources
Calendar
Classifieds
Ham Exams
Ham Links
List Archives
News Articles
Product Reviews
QSL Managers

Site Info
eHam Help (FAQ)
Support the site
The eHam Team
Advertising Info
Vision Statement
About eHam.net

donate to eham
   Home   Help Search  
Pages: [1]   Go Down
  Print  
Author Topic: Icom IC-2200H power supply  (Read 6754 times)
PASSEDTHETEST12
Member

Posts: 3




Ignore
« on: February 23, 2012, 06:23:28 PM »


Hello,
I am a high school student who is very new to ham. I got a used radio (Icom ic-2200H), and  now I'm looking for a power supply. I'm on a bit of a budget, so alternative methods are welcome. Max draw is 15A in to the radio,so I was thinking a Pyramid PS14K in Parallel with a car battery. That or if someone want's to sell me a 15-20 A power supply on the cheep.

Thanks,
Nolan
 (No call sign yet)
Logged
PASSEDTHETEST12
Member

Posts: 3




Ignore
« Reply #1 on: February 23, 2012, 08:12:19 PM »

Okay, crazy new idea, What about one of these which I have: http://www.geeks.com/details.asp?invtid=G-500-DF&cat=PWR
Logged
KD8HYN
Member

Posts: 22




Ignore
« Reply #2 on: February 23, 2012, 09:39:01 PM »

Welcome to amateur radio, Nolan.

If my calculations are correct, 12v @ 15 amps would be a maximum of 180 watts.

While a computer power supply would produce a nice clean signal, I don't believe each individual channel/circuit/whatever can handle that, it's meant to be balanced across the connectors for the motherboard and drives etc. I attempted to power a 55w automotive fog lamp from a molex connector on my computer's PSU once and was greeted with a brief burst of light, rather large spark and almost instant shutdown of the PC. Started back up after a minute, but still. With no other load I suppose it could work but I haven't seen many other hams using these to power their shack.

I found this forum thread on QRZ on the subject for what it's worth:
http://forums.qrz.com/showthread.php?246634-ATX-Power-Supply-for-Ham-Radio

You could also home brew:
http://users.belgacom.net/hamradio/schemas/12-20amps%20power%20supply_on6mu.htm

I'm sort of in the same boat as you, I just purchased a mobile rig and ultimately would like to use it as a base at least part time. It seems to me like it may end up being worth it to shell out a bit for a quality power supply, to protect your rig and for future projects/equipment.
Logged

73
PASSEDTHETEST12
Member

Posts: 3




Ignore
« Reply #3 on: February 23, 2012, 09:54:17 PM »

Thank you,
 I was talking to my uncle (who is also a ham) and he found this which seems to be what I was looking for, maybe it can help you. http://www.arrl.org/files/file/Technology/tis/info/pdf/0205035.pdf
Logged
KD8HYN
Member

Posts: 22




Ignore
« Reply #4 on: February 23, 2012, 09:56:35 PM »

Well, the price is right  Grin

I am gonna have to try this for sure. Thanks for the link!
Logged

73
K5LXP
Member

Posts: 6092


WWW

Ignore
« Reply #5 on: February 24, 2012, 06:19:20 AM »

I wouldn't recommend using a PC power supply to power a high power transceiver.  I've tried this, and there are a number of issues that make it impractical.

First, the 12V output is just that, 12V.  Most radios expect 13.8V +/- 15%.  So right out of the chute you're running very close to the radio's minimum input voltage (11.75V).

The regulation on these supplies is not terrific.  Expect a small variation of the 12V output at no load, and a fair amount under high power draw.  The PC doesn't care about this, but your radio will.

The 12V side of PC supplies do not offer a huge amount of current, as the different voltages have different output requirements.  There aren't that many devices in a PC that require 12V, so that part of the supply is commensurately small.  At best it'd be enough to run the rig at low or medium power.

The output purity of PC supplies is not all that stellar, at around 100mV of ripple.  Contrast that to a "real" radio power supply like an Astron which has 1/10 that amount of ripple.  While it won't "hurt" the radio, it has the potential to generate spurs in the output which can cause interference to others (I've proven this with a spectrum analyzer).

Bottom line is it's more trouble than it's worth.  After many years of going to hamfests, fleamarkets and yard sales there's no shortage of useable power supplies you can find for very reasonable prices.  I look for "dead" linear supplies for free or nominal price, put $5 worth of parts into them and they're good for another 20 years.  I would much sooner go down that road than deal with "tricking" a PC supply to fire off and working around its performance issues.


Mark K5LXP
Albuquerque, NM

Logged
Pages: [1]   Go Up
  Print  
 
Jump to:  

Powered by MySQL Powered by PHP Powered by SMF 1.1.11 | SMF © 2006-2009, Simple Machines LLC Valid XHTML 1.0! Valid CSS!