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Author Topic: Radio Shack Return Policy  (Read 31389 times)
KD8LAV
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Posts: 1




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« on: May 04, 2012, 06:57:49 PM »

Is it just me or does anyone else have a problem with Radio Shack Merchandise Return Policy.
If you have a receipt to prove you did purchase it. Why do they want your name,address and so on.
Then here is what happened to me.
I first questioned the clerk and all he could say is "It is policy" I explained to him I have a receipt why does he need all this info?
He repeated "policy" and got his Manager. Now it gets fun.
The manager has the same line" It is policy" and then procedes to hand me back my merchandise that I want to return and tells me to have a nice day. I then ask for the corporate number to get in contact with a Higher up that him. He give me a false number that came back to a private residents. So I look on the web and find Radio Shack Headquarters number. I finally get to a real person and they tell me the same thing, "It is policy" and I questioned him as to why and he just hung up the phone.
Yes, I know, I should know better that to go to Cell Phone Shack and deal with the BS they like to put out. I would like to know if this is how they think business should be run. So beware of the return policy that wants to know everthing about you for the junk mailings.
Has anyone else had this same trouble, and how many retailer need all your info when you have the receipt?

73 de KD8LAV
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KA5N
Member

Posts: 4380




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« Reply #1 on: May 05, 2012, 03:46:43 AM »

I used to go to Radio Shack from time to time.   Then if you bought something, they would
want to know your phone number and other stuff.  I would just say this is a cash purchase
and you don't need to know my name or phone number.  The clerk's face would get all funny
and he would grudgingly submit and take my money.
I was in a Radio Shack one day when the clerk (who obiviously been hired that day) told
his manager that he just couldn't make it at rad-shack and walked out of the store. 
Imagine someone too dumb to work at RS!!!!
Allen
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N5VTU
Member

Posts: 388




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« Reply #2 on: May 05, 2012, 10:26:01 AM »

Here's a copy of the Rat Shack Return policy as posted online.  I see no mention of having to provide all of your personal information...maybe the clerks are misinformed or is is policy at only that store (franshise location?).  Did you ask to see a copy of the return policy?  Is it by chance printed on the back side of the receipt?

http://www.radioshack.com/helpdesk/index.jsp?display=returns&subdisplay=restrictions

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K2OWK
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Posts: 1279




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« Reply #3 on: May 05, 2012, 08:58:31 PM »

Radio Shack is not the only store to ask for this information. Harbor Freight does the same thing and there are many others. This information is used to send you adds for the store. Sometimes it is sold to other retailers and wholesalers so they can solicit you for there products. I simply say to the cashear, I do not wish to give out that information. If you insist, I will take my purchase elseware. I have never been refused a purchase yet.

73s

K2OWK
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N5VTU
Member

Posts: 388




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« Reply #4 on: May 06, 2012, 05:33:02 AM »

Radio Shack is not the only store to ask for this information. Harbor Freight does the same thing and there are many others. This information is used to send you adds for the store. Sometimes it is sold to other retailers and wholesalers so they can solicit you for there products. I simply say to the cashear, I do not wish to give out that information. If you insist, I will take my purchase elseware. I have never been refused a purchase yet.

73s

K2OWK

The original poster is not asking about making a purchase, he's asking about a return.  I too normally decline to provide the requested information when making a purchase.  I'd be curious to see if the store could provide this return "policy" in writing.
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K5XLA
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Posts: 1




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« Reply #5 on: May 25, 2012, 06:12:46 AM »

Having worked in retail for many years, I suspect that this policy has little to do with the customer and is an internal security measure. Retail stores suffer great losses from employee theft and take measures to make it more difficult for employees to forge "refunds". In the retail industry, internal theft far exceeds theft from shoplifting and burglary.

While one may not like this type of policy, it's not totally uncommon for a retail establishment to take some steps to control losses. What really annoys me is when a "manager approval" is needed for a return in a large store and you have to stand and wait for a manager to come strolling across the store.

My 2 cents.
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KD8IWZ
Member

Posts: 60




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« Reply #6 on: May 25, 2012, 07:02:39 AM »

When asked to give name, address, and phone #, I ask the person I am dealing with for his/her name, address, phone #. If met with any resistance, I pull out my cel, ask for the # for their corporate, (bypassing the store manager), always get a prompt refund then.
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K0OD
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Posts: 3030




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« Reply #7 on: May 27, 2012, 08:39:16 AM »


K5XLA gave the correct answer:
Quote
... an internal security measure. Retail stores suffer great losses from employee theft and take measures to make it more difficult for employees to forge "refunds". In the retail industry, internal theft far exceeds theft from shoplifting and burglary.

BTW with two exceptions, common law gives buyers no RIGHT to return merchandise. "I changed my mind" is certainly not one of them. However almost all modern retailers bend over backwards to 1) make customers happy; 2) avoid confrontations.

With suspicious transactions my company on rare occasions phones numbers on those return slips to determine whether the customer, not our employee or his pal, got the cash.

If you think retail stores can absorb such losses visit your neighborhood empty mall.
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K1CJS
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Posts: 6283




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« Reply #8 on: May 28, 2012, 07:32:18 AM »

If you don't want to put your real name down, put down a fake name, address and phone.  I always do.
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KB7QOA
Member

Posts: 18




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« Reply #9 on: May 31, 2012, 12:05:41 PM »

To make matters worse, many retailers are now requiring photo ID to return anything, and the stores keep the information on file.  They then track how much each person returns, and eventually deny returns at all if they think the person makes too many returns over a period of time.  There have also been claims that some larger chain stores use a centralized 3rd party company to track returns, which means if a person returns "too many" items at chain A, they can be denied a return at chain B because they're "in the system."

I don't know what the answer is, as it has been previously mentioned that retailers do need to protect themselves from return abuse.  A lot of "retail rental" goes on where someone buys an item, uses it once, and returns it when they don't need it any more.  The problem is that it is not uncommon to hear of "false positives" resulting in returns being denied when they shouldn't have been.

Other than voting with our wallets and avoiding retailers who use this practice, there isn't much we as "consumers" can do to avoid this.  Unfortunately as large superstores continue to drive out the mom & pop stores, it is becoming more and more difficult to shop elsewhere.

73 de KB7QOA
Jeremy
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W3WN
Member

Posts: 844




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« Reply #10 on: June 22, 2012, 09:00:31 AM »

Is it just me or does anyone else have a problem with Radio Shack Merchandise Return Policy.
If you have a receipt to prove you did purchase it. Why do they want your name,address and so on.
Then here is what happened to me.
I first questioned the clerk and all he could say is "It is policy" I explained to him I have a receipt why does he need all this info?
He repeated "policy" and got his Manager. Now it gets fun.
The manager has the same line" It is policy" and then procedes to hand me back my merchandise that I want to return and tells me to have a nice day. I then ask for the corporate number to get in contact with a Higher up that him. He give me a false number that came back to a private residents. So I look on the web and find Radio Shack Headquarters number. I finally get to a real person and they tell me the same thing, "It is policy" and I questioned him as to why and he just hung up the phone.
Yes, I know, I should know better that to go to Cell Phone Shack and deal with the BS they like to put out. I would like to know if this is how they think business should be run. So beware of the return policy that wants to know everthing about you for the junk mailings.
Has anyone else had this same trouble, and how many retailer need all your info when you have the receipt?

73 de KD8LAV
First, nothing I'm about to say is intended to condone rude behavior to a customer, which is what happened to you and only served to exascerbate the situation.

Many stores do ask for contact information on a returned item, in part to be able to verify that the person who made the return IS the person who purchased the merchandise, or authorized the return.  They may ask to see ID for the same reason. 

I spent 3 years toiling at various Home Depots, between full-time IT employment, a few years back.  During that period of time, I was acting department manager for Hardware (DM was recovering from a car accident).  I could fill pages of stories of some of the scams that were attempted.  But to stay pertinent... in one case, we had a contractor's employee steal an expensive hand tool.  How he got the receipt as well I don't know, but he tried to return it to our store for cash.  His story didn't quite add up, though (he claimed to be part-owner, but couldn't remember the business office phone, as I recall).  We declined the return, even after he raised a fuss -- and then we contacted the contractor. 

Now, I don't know exactly what happened next, but I did have a conversation with a nice gentleman from the police department later that day... and I don't remember ever seeing that employee again...

So again, not to excuse rude behavior when it's uncalled for, but cut the stores a little slack.  When they get ripped-off, ultimately WE pay for it in higher prices or discontinued items.  They're trying to head that off by asking for this info when you make a return.  They're not looking to add you to a mailing list.
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KD0REQ
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Posts: 2389




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« Reply #11 on: June 22, 2012, 03:52:27 PM »

almost everybody requires name, address, phone, ID, fingerprints, DNA typing, etc. on a return now.

in case of a scam, like returning a brick in a box showing an expensive thingie on the cover, the information becomes useful in getting the money back, one way or the other.  in case of a guy returning their old junk in the box of a new shiny, likewise.

since I'm honest, I don't mind.

if you're sensitive, don't go back to a store where they are watching their bottom line, as well as their customer experience.  somehow I don't get to places where they spit on you when you walk in the door, pick your pockets, call you names, charge you triple... and then refuse a refund on top of it.
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N9YNG
Member

Posts: 18




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« Reply #12 on: June 26, 2012, 01:48:01 PM »

Having worked in retail for many years, I suspect that this policy has little to do with the customer and is an internal security measure. Retail stores suffer great losses from employee theft and take measures to make it more difficult for employees to forge "refunds". In the retail industry, internal theft far exceeds theft from shoplifting and burglary.

While one may not like this type of policy, it's not totally uncommon for a retail establishment to take some steps to control losses. What really annoys me is when a "manager approval" is needed for a return in a large store and you have to stand and wait for a manager to come strolling across the store.

My 2 cents.
I agree.

When I worked retail, we had a front-end manager that was doing this.  Every day she worked, she would do about $50 worth of returns.  Apparently, some number-cruncher realized that on certain days, we had about $50 extra worth of returns.  So, an internal review was done, security realized she was forging these returns, and she was let go and possibly prosecuted.
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K7EDL
Member

Posts: 11




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« Reply #13 on: June 26, 2012, 03:36:03 PM »

I'm sorry we live in an age where people believe the only thing wrong is geting caught.
We all pay the price by not being trusted.

scams for those of you who are uninitiated

1. Buy somthing use it for a weekend or more then return it. Big screen tv's superbowl weekend, wearing high end clothing to a party etc.

2. buy somthing you need, steel a second one, return it for a refund. (which is why walmart tags returns when you walk into the store)

3 the store clerk who is imbezzeling from the company. (its amazing how often its the manager)

all of these are discuraged buy tracking names and addresses. it doesnt stop it it jus slows it down. 

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UA3PAL
Member

Posts: 1




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« Reply #14 on: July 30, 2012, 09:33:29 AM »

When asked for a phone number when checking out, I always reply: Are you asking me on a date?   Most of the time it gets them confused and they don't ask any more questions. One thing I'm affraid of....... What of someone answers yes! LOL
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