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Author Topic: Meissner Signal Shifter Deluxe  (Read 27977 times)
K8AXW
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Posts: 7036




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« Reply #15 on: September 02, 2013, 10:10:28 PM »

Peter:  I went back and checked my bookmarks and found what I was referring to when I mentioned the history of ham radio in this country.  Here is the link:

http://w2pa.net/HRH/

At the bottom of the page you'll find a list of articles about early radio in the US, in chronological order. 

Al - K8AXW
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K8AXW
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« Reply #16 on: September 02, 2013, 10:19:48 PM »

Greg:  From what I read I will have to agree with you 100%!  The two way radio or "wireless" turned into some kind of craze or frenzy during these early days. 

When the hams organized and started publishing their own newsletter, things really took off. Experimentation seemed to go on non-stop.  It had to have been a very exciting time.
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K0OD
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« Reply #17 on: September 02, 2013, 11:13:52 PM »



Back in the day, they always had a transmitter/VFO/receiver? When did they start integrating them?

Here's a rare late-1930s CW transceiver made for use in the Civilian Conservation Corps during the New Deal. A nearly identical AM version existed too.
http://www.wb6nvh.com/CCC/RSPEC.htm



Notice the large switch to go between transmit and receive. Worked in the 2.5 MHz area.

Anyone know of an earlier transceiver?

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G3RZP
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« Reply #18 on: September 02, 2013, 11:40:45 PM »

I was talking of commercial transceivers for amateur use, which certainly in any quantity were very late 50's/early 60's : there were a lot of AM transceivers in used WW2, examples being the British Army 19 set (supplied in quantity to the Russians as well), the 18 and 38 sets and the New Zealand ZC1. These were all true transceivers as we know them today except they were AM with with no IRT! I don't at what stage there were transceivers introduced for the Australian outback for contacting the RFDS and providing lessons etc, but I suspect well pre WW2.

There were a few amateur transceivers on 6 metres with superregen detectors of course.
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WB6BYU
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« Reply #19 on: September 04, 2013, 12:57:58 PM »

It was really the introduction of SSB that lead the shift to transceivers instead of
separate transmitters and receivers.  That's because it allowed a single VFO and
crystal or mechanical filter to be used for both functions.

A typical CW or AM station would generate the TX carrier directly, using a crystal or VFO
on the operating frequency (or a sub-harmonic thereof.)  The receiver local oscillator
would be offset from the operating frequency by the IF.  As a result the two oscillators
were on different frequencies, and there really were no common stages except perhaps
for a power supply and part of the audio chain on AM.

Many of the early transceivers (including the HW-16 and the wartime Whaddon MK VII
'Paraset'
) had separate TX and RX frequency control - in those two models, the
TX was crystal controlled, while the receiver to be tuned across the band to listen for
calls.  This was often called a "Transmitter-Receiver" rather than a "Transceiver"
when there were no significant circuits shared between the two functions.

While it was possible to use the oscillating detector in a regen receiver as a low power
transmitter (the forerunner of the modern direct-conversion QRP transceiver), it was
difficult to get both TX and RX on the same frequency due to the shift in operating
conditions, especially for higher output power.

But on SSB you needed a common VFO and filter (or phasing) approach for both
transmit and receive in order to generate / demodulate the signal, and a transceiver
became much more practical.
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K8AXW
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« Reply #20 on: September 04, 2013, 09:00:42 PM »

RZP: Peter, I just started a book written by R.V. Jones, PhD., called "Most Secret War," but the American copy has the name "The Wizard War."

His quote: "My main hobby in my schooldays was, as with many other boys of my generation, the making of radio receiving sets.  There has never been anything comparable in any other period of history to the impact of radio on the ordinary individual in the 1920's.  It was the product of some of the most imaginative developments that have ever occurred in physics, and it was as near magic as anyone could conceive, in that with a few mainly home-made components simply connected together one could conjure speech and music out of the air.  The construction of radio receivers was just within the competence of the average man, who could thus write himself a passport to countries he could never hope to visit.

And he could always make modifications that might improve his aerial or his receiver and give him something to boast about to his friends."

I think this pretty well sums up why interest and innovation in radio erupted as it did in those days. 

73

Al - K8AXW
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G3RZP
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Posts: 1225




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« Reply #21 on: September 05, 2013, 12:38:31 AM »

Al,

He was never a ham. But you may note the mention in the book of Scott-Farnie - he was G5FI.

The equivalent, pre 1939, of a 1948 75A1 was, in cash terms, a HRO Sr! Anybody with one of those was looked up to. For a reasonably well paid medium grade civil servant, the HRO represented 12 weeks pay.....
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LASERNERD
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« Reply #22 on: December 25, 2017, 10:06:14 AM »

OK,bringing life back to this thread.I was gifted a pristine unit.I need to know what each of those antenna posts are used for,Also the Terminal strip and its purpose,Also is the speaker connection on the internal terminal strip?
Thank you
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KM1H
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Posts: 5104




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« Reply #23 on: December 25, 2017, 04:42:22 PM »

The US Army also bought the standard Meissner 150B "desktop" TX around 1940-41 transmitter as an interim until the BC-610 and others came along and a general coverage Signal Shifter VFO was part of the package.

I have the VFO with a full coil set from below the BCB to 25 mc and have used it extensively as a big part of my 9 Band QRP DXCC. I use it now mostly on 30M with a 1934 National FB-XA which started out for Grins and Giggles but aint so bad after all.. After a good overhaul of paper caps, etc both are quite stable and fun to play with.

The name plate lists it as Exciter Unit 04233 part of 150-B Transmitting Equipment. It is gray with the coil drawer below as part of the cabinet and the only one Ive seen that way as the later Army versions Ive seen are all tan as are the 150B's.

I also used it for awhile as the VFO for a pre War Hallicrafters HT-9 and also picked up a set of the ham version bandspread coils which makes it easier to zero beat but no dial calibration.

I also have a few of the later EX Shifter including one with the 160 coil set, another in a rack cabinet and the others standard table models with and without the NBFM chassis.

Carl
« Last Edit: December 25, 2017, 04:49:06 PM by KM1H » Logged
KM1H
Member

Posts: 5104




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« Reply #24 on: December 25, 2017, 04:45:03 PM »

Quote
OK,bringing life back to this thread.I was gifted a pristine unit.I need to know what each of those antenna posts are used for,Also the Terminal strip and its purpose,Also is the speaker connection on the internal terminal strip?

http://bama.edebris.com/manuals/meissner/oldss

This might help a few

http://bama.edebris.com/manuals/meissner/ssdial

Carl
« Last Edit: December 25, 2017, 04:49:29 PM by KM1H » Logged
LASERNERD
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Posts: 4




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« Reply #25 on: December 25, 2017, 04:48:04 PM »

By chance could I get a little info. from you? The 2 antenna terminals on the rear could you tell what they are for? Is the one closest to the Gnd.the receive?, Also the 2 terminals on the internal chassis is that speaker?

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KM1H
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Posts: 5104




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« Reply #26 on: December 25, 2017, 04:51:57 PM »

Read the manual I referenced
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LASERNERD
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Posts: 4




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« Reply #27 on: December 25, 2017, 04:53:01 PM »

Thank you KM1H,just got it when I replied.
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KM1H
Member

Posts: 5104




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« Reply #28 on: December 26, 2017, 05:34:47 PM »

If you decide to part with it I would be interested and would match it up with one of my period receivers, likely the SX-23.

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LASERNERD
Member

Posts: 4




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« Reply #29 on: December 26, 2017, 06:23:09 PM »

KM1H your info. that you provided is very helpful.It is a whole different machine then I thought.I have 3 sets of coils.I would like to trade for something that is Tube.I really enjoy tubes.Maybe a tube amp?
And it works,it has the add on part.
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