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Author Topic: National NC-109  (Read 16520 times)
NR4C
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Posts: 496




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« on: September 15, 2013, 01:10:30 PM »

Are there groups or lists for this receiver?

Just bought one, like to talk to someone who has or is familiar with them.

...bill nr4c
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KAPT4560
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« Reply #1 on: September 15, 2013, 01:41:25 PM »

 I don't have this particular National model, but have an NC-88, NC-98, NC-125 and an NC-200. I've never owned an HRO, but maybe one day I will. I would also have to find a new way to sneak it past the wife.  Grin
There is a discussion about the NC-109 here: http://www.antiqueradios.com/forums/viewtopic.php?f=5&t=218736
I have also joined the QTH.net forum on Nationals for service answers: http://mailman.qth.net/mailman/listinfo/national
I didn't originally start out as a National "NC" fan, but have somehow acquired them over the years. I have warmed up to them after spending some quality listening time with them.
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W9GB
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Posts: 3379




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« Reply #2 on: September 15, 2013, 01:59:12 PM »

Bill -

I would suggest posting question on the Antique Radios Forum - The Collectors Resource.
http://www.antiqueradios.com/forums/index.php

Pete, K7PP acquired same receiver in March 2013, and posted question at Antique Radio Forums.
http://www.antiqueradios.com/forums/viewtopic.php?f=5&t=218736&p=1832210&hilit=NC109#p1832210

National NC-109 (1957-1960)
http://www.prismnet.com/~nielw/nat_list/nc109.htm
A review can be found in the January 1958 issue of QST magazine.
http://www.ohio.edu/people/postr/bapix/NC109.htm

The National NC-109 is an 11 tube general coverage single conversion receiver covering 550 KHz to 40 MHz in 4 bands. Has BFO, electrical bandspread marked for the Ham bands, crystal filter, product detector, and separate RF gain and volume controls. The tubes in this set are 6C4 oscillator, 6AL5 as detector, AVC and noise limiter, two 6BA6 as IF amps and a third as RF amp, one 6BE6 as converter and a second as heterodyne detector and BFO, 12AV7 as first AF amp and S meter amp, 6AQ5 audio output, 0B2 voltage regulator, and 5Y3 rectifier. It was introduced in 1957 at a price of $199.95.
The NTS-1 matching speaker was an optional accessory.
Advertisements for the National NC-109 receiver can be found in the ARRL Handbooks (1960).

The NC-188 is a reduced-cost same-size twin without the crystal filter, product detector, or voltage regulator.
It was priced at $159.95.
==
Niel Wiegand, W0VLZ shows a picture a schematic diagram of the XCU-109,
the optional crystal calibrator for the NC-109.
http://www.prismnet.com/~nielw/nat_list/xcu109.htm
It hangs off the rear of the set by plugging into the NC-109's rear-panel octal socket.
This set did not come with one. However, it looks simple enough to build using a 6AK6.
« Last Edit: September 15, 2013, 02:12:24 PM by W9GB » Logged
K7WXK
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Posts: 75




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« Reply #3 on: September 16, 2013, 03:46:03 PM »

Bill,

On antiqueradios.com you'll find plenty of information on the 109.  One forum member thinks it is the "sleeper" of the National family.  I haven't tried one, but did have an NC-183D, and it has the greatest audio of all the general coverage receivers (IMHO).  Great receivers, Nationals.

Marc
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WA2CWA
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« Reply #4 on: September 16, 2013, 05:57:41 PM »

I owned a NC-109 for almost 25 years. First receiver in my amateur career. It's really a sleeper above 14 MHz. Half the time you wonder if the receiver really works or is awake. The receiver follows conventional designs of the time period. There's no magic in it. Nationals NC-183, 183D, 173, HRO-50, HRO-60 and a host of others run rings around it. I was not unhappy when I found it a new home.

Pete, wa2cwa
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NI0C
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Posts: 3270




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« Reply #5 on: September 16, 2013, 07:50:00 PM »

I owned a NC-109 for almost 25 years. First receiver in my amateur career. It's really a sleeper above 14 MHz. Half the time you wonder if the receiver really works or is awake. The receiver follows conventional designs of the time period. There's no magic in it. Nationals NC-183, 183D, 173, HRO-50, HRO-60 and a host of others run rings around it. I was not unhappy when I found it a new home.

Pete, wa2cwa

I agree, Pete.  I had mine from 1960-64.  It looks pretty, but looks aren't everything.  As I recall, it was a conventional single-conversion superhet with a 455 KHz IF.  The crystal filter was just so so-- very sharp nose, but atrociously wide skirts.  Still, I worked my first DXCC with it. 
73,
Chuck  NI0C
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