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Author Topic: The frustration of QSO w/ ham using tube gear  (Read 52202 times)
W2WDX
Member

Posts: 218




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« Reply #15 on: October 23, 2013, 10:15:39 PM »

Go talk on CB, it's all channelized for those of you who refuse use the rotary TUNING knobs.

Geez!!! Lid.
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K3STX
Member

Posts: 1644




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« Reply #16 on: October 24, 2013, 06:23:30 AM »

i can't believe someone would complain about frequency drift on a BOATANCHOR FORUM!

I agree with the others, tuning around makes it fun. After my first year with an old DX-100, I spent the next 30 years with transceivers that did not drift at all. Now I use a drifty boatanchor RX and chirpy TX and I am having alot more fun.

paul
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KA5N
Member

Posts: 4380




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« Reply #17 on: October 24, 2013, 08:53:05 AM »

Imagine being a novice in the 1950's.  You were lucky if you and the other op where within
a couple of hundred Hertz to begin with. Then you  had to spend the whole QSO chasing one another. 
What's a little drift between hams?

Allen KA5N
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KJ6ZOL
Member

Posts: 820




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« Reply #18 on: October 24, 2013, 09:28:26 AM »

i can't believe someone would complain about frequency drift on a BOATANCHOR FORUM!

I agree with the others, tuning around makes it fun. After my first year with an old DX-100, I spent the next 30 years with transceivers that did not drift at all. Now I use a drifty boatanchor RX and chirpy TX and I am having alot more fun.

paul

LOL. Yes I know, I sounded stupid. I have a Kenwood TS130S, which has a digital readout, and on top of that I've only been a General for a year, and was not on air until last July, so I'm fairly new. I don't think I could handle having to coordinate a separate tx and rx that is drifting around.  Grin Tongue Roll Eyes What probably happened here is that the guy's tx and rx weren't on the same freq. It happens.
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KH2BR
Member

Posts: 16




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« Reply #19 on: October 24, 2013, 09:48:30 AM »

Just read this guys past posts. you will see that he is just a communicator hobbyist with no technical background
which is a result of deregulation.
I get great enjoyment working chirpy drifting cw stations. I have worked many and my most favorite is
working the ARC5. I also enjoy giving new life to hollow state gear and that brings to mind one point.

Please stop hording the old gear. My last cw contact was with a nice gentleman in Colorado. I checked out his QRZ
page and was stunned. No wonder there is not much old gear for sale on ebay or other forums. He is hording it all
as well as many others.

Robert KH2BR
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WA9CFK
Member

Posts: 214




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« Reply #20 on: October 24, 2013, 10:03:09 AM »

If you use the appliances that modern ham radio offers and you do not understand the concept of accepting the challenges of older gear.

Then there is no sense trying to explain it; you would not understand anyway. 
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KJ6ZOL
Member

Posts: 820




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« Reply #21 on: October 24, 2013, 10:34:39 AM »

My background-what there is of it-is in computers. I am a certified computer tech. I'm also young, I'm 39 in November. I'll go away now...
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W1JKA
Member

Posts: 2099




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« Reply #22 on: October 24, 2013, 11:12:36 AM »

Re: KJ6ZOL

    No need to go away, stick around take a little heat and have a little fun .Opinions and off hand comments on these forums run the gamut but more often than not you can pick up some useful information and knowledge.
« Last Edit: October 24, 2013, 11:51:17 AM by W1JKA » Logged
W8AAZ
Member

Posts: 379




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« Reply #23 on: October 24, 2013, 04:31:44 PM »

Got an all solid state FT-77 backup that uses a VFO but has a digital display anyway.  THe display and the VFO both drift a fair bit before it warms up.  I leave it on for an hour and then it seems to stick to the freq.  OK. Small rig and so sweet sounding, I can overlook that flaw.  But my main rig is TXCO synthesized, so I just turn it on, and bam, stays put all day. But perhaps not as much fun as the old rigs.   
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KC4MOP
Member

Posts: 960




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« Reply #24 on: October 25, 2013, 03:33:50 AM »

The sudden shift in frequency is not typical of tube gear. There must have been an electronic problem in his VFO. Probably a silver mica cap in the oscillator becoming erratic and changing value. Or the voltage regulator problem mentioned earlier.
The late 80's Kenwoods, all solid state, had some weird goop coating on the sensitive PLL circuits that would cause the VFO to suddenly go out of lock. There was a fix to clean this stuff out around those sensitive components and it was just like new.
We're just amateur radio ops. It's a learning process.
I'll admit the poor design of some of the less expensive older tube equipment left a lot to be desired. But as we get into using them in the 21st century, there have been fixes and small modifications to improve their original design.
Fred
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N4OI
Member

Posts: 401




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« Reply #25 on: October 25, 2013, 05:19:58 AM »

[...]
I get great enjoyment working chirpy drifting cw stations. [...]

What's even better is working a drifting station with a DC boat anchor that drifts a bit also... kind of like hide and seek...

73  Grin

Three Stooges:
"Where's your vice?"
"Vice? I have no vice, I'm as pure as the driven snow!"
"Yeah, but you drifted."
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KJ6ZOL
Member

Posts: 820




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« Reply #26 on: October 25, 2013, 08:06:07 AM »

A long long time ago, I got started in SWL with an old Hallicrafters S-40. I'd never seen a piece of tube gear before, it was 1986 and I was 11, and I thought it was very cool. As I remember, with that radio you could only get to within 5 khz of your desired freq. I believe that radios that would get to within 1 khz didn't appear until maybe 1970. Since the simplest explanation is usually the best, I'll just say that the ham may have accidentally hit the tuning knob on the tx, which is why I could hear him but to him I was off freq. It happens. Recently I keyed up on my Kenwood only to find that my RF meter wouldn't move. Somehow, I'd turned down the mic gain.  Tongue Roll Eyes I still have no idea how that happened.
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KD8IIC
Member

Posts: 788




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« Reply #27 on: October 25, 2013, 08:58:39 AM »

  I fully agree with 7Q ! Wasn't so long ago many with xtal only rigs had to work others with widely split frequencies as not everyone had a VFO let alone a frequency counter or digital readout.. Yup, old gear drifts and chirps and makes me feel fine when I use it. I'm usually told that it's great to hear an old rig like that again...73 lane de n8aft  sk  .. Smiley
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KB4QAA
Member

Posts: 3339




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« Reply #28 on: October 25, 2013, 01:07:37 PM »

Learning to work with drift is part of the game.  If you have a modern rig then you have the luxury of a RIT.  Compensating for the other fellow's drift is precisely what it is designed for.

The thing you don't want to do is turn the big knob and shift YOUR xmit frequency as well.  One of the first lessons I learned as a Novice with an Heath SB-102 (20 tubes) was to avoid skating across the band with both ops re-centering after each exchange.  Smiley

You brought up a great lesson that we haven't discussed in a long time!

73, bill
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KA0HCP, ex-KB4QAA Relocated to Ks. April 2019.
KC4MOP
Member

Posts: 960




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« Reply #29 on: October 27, 2013, 05:28:09 AM »

Learning to work with drift is part of the game.  If you have a modern rig then you have the luxury of a RIT.  Compensating for the other fellow's drift is precisely what it is designed for.

The thing you don't want to do is turn the big knob and shift YOUR xmit frequency as well.  One of the first lessons I learned as a Novice with an Heath SB-102 (20 tubes) was to avoid skating across the band with both ops re-centering after each exchange.  Smiley

You brought up a great lesson that we haven't discussed in a long time!

73, bill

So true.....The older Ham ops here should remember the dayz of that drifting problem that most units had "back in the day". Part of the fun..we are spoiled with digital readouts and PLL circuits.
Fred
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