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Author Topic: The frustration of QSO w/ ham using tube gear  (Read 52198 times)
N1RND
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Posts: 57




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« Reply #30 on: October 27, 2013, 05:52:31 AM »

Old tube rigs are just like old cars of the same vintage.  Your constantly fiddling with them.  They both have their weird smells, noises, hiccups, etc.
Thats why I love them both.
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KJ3Q
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Posts: 7




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« Reply #31 on: October 28, 2013, 11:39:23 AM »

After listening briefly to this past weekend's ssb contest, i don't know why drift is even an issue. The average contest QSO doesn't last more than 20 seconds. Now, if you want to ragchew, its all for fun and i see the tuning in as a fun part of being an operator.
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K4SC
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Posts: 30




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« Reply #32 on: October 28, 2013, 01:55:57 PM »

Remember the Drifty Three-Fifty?  That was a common nickname for the Swan 350 transceiver, and it was an appropriate name at that.
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G3RZP
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Posts: 1284




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« Reply #33 on: October 28, 2013, 02:52:42 PM »

Wasn't the Hammarlund HX50 also called the 'drifty fifty'?
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KG8LB
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Posts: 408




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« Reply #34 on: November 01, 2013, 03:59:38 AM »

Yes, his signal abruptly jumped a khz. He was at one place just fine, then all of a sudden he was out of tune. Maybe he hit the knob accidentally. Antique gear tended to have the rx and tx separate, so it's possible his tx jumped around when his rx didn't, and that's why he told me I was off freq.

   An abrupt jump in frequency is most likely a different animal with a different cause than what we call "DRIFT" . Abrubt changes are almost always more mechanical than electrical in nature . A bad ground , poor solder joint perhaps the most common cause , a corroded or dirty wiper on an air variable capacitor .

  I had an NC-183D that would jump 5 KC all by itself and just as abruptly it would jump right back . At first I thought it was the other station dropping his carrier . Turned out a simple cleaning of the tuning cap restored stable operation .
  Last Sunday I put a DX-100B on the air that had been in storage for about 20 years . It would jump 1.5 KC . When listeng to the TX set in "Spot" on my Drake R-8A in CW it was easy to hear the chunky warbling . Turned out to be an air trimmer with a dirty wiper .

  Surely the jumping issue is not common , surely most vintage operators do a fine job of staying reasonably on frequency . I do have a DDS VFO on my Globe Champion 300A that is far more stable than many of the rice-box rigs , solid state or tubed . 
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K0BT
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Posts: 27




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« Reply #35 on: November 01, 2013, 10:44:25 AM »

Remember the Drifty Three-Fifty?  That was a common nickname for the Swan 350 transceiver, and it was an appropriate name at that.

Or the Eico Seven Drifty Three - my personal favorite for "chasing" the rare ones.  One hand always on the tuning knob.

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AA4PB
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« Reply #36 on: November 01, 2013, 11:51:05 AM »

I changed my Eico 753 over to crystal control with several channels for MARS use. It was rock solid  Cheesy
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Bob  AA4PB
Garrisonville, VA
G3RZP
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Posts: 1284




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« Reply #37 on: November 01, 2013, 12:51:49 PM »

OK, AA4PB, so you like puns.....
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W6BP
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Posts: 536




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« Reply #38 on: November 01, 2013, 01:09:48 PM »

I changed my Eico 753 over to crystal control with several channels for MARS use. It was rock solid  Cheesy


I gave mine away.  Never gave me any problems after that.
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KD0REQ
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Posts: 2389




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« Reply #39 on: November 01, 2013, 01:58:56 PM »

yaesu 890s are a modern radio that gets that hiccupy feeling from the trimpot on the timebase.

it's not just kerosene-powered rigs that get the yips.
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KE7TMA
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Posts: 537




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« Reply #40 on: November 04, 2013, 07:45:37 PM »

Yes, his signal abruptly jumped a khz. He was at one place just fine, then all of a sudden he was out of tune. Maybe he hit the knob accidentally. Antique gear tended to have the rx and tx separate, so it's possible his tx jumped around when his rx didn't, and that's why he told me I was off freq.

I've done this myself.  What maybe happened was that he suddenly hears a QSO in progress on the frequency he was tuned to and moved out of courtesy.  Sometimes the ionosphere plays funny tricks on you and you end up steamrolling somebody unintentionally.

Sometimes, too, the "dit guy" who "owns" the frequency you chose decides to dit at you like some kind of fishwife and you move rather than getting into "his" airwaves.  There's a dit guy like that somewhere near Portland, OR who "owns" 3.525.
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AA4HA
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Posts: 2630




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« Reply #41 on: November 05, 2013, 01:52:52 PM »

Sometimes, too, the "dit guy" who "owns" the frequency you chose decides to dit at you like some kind of fishwife and you move rather than getting into "his" airwaves.  There's a dit guy like that somewhere near Portland, OR who "owns" 3.525.

Gosh, you did not get the memo about 3525 being the northwest Pacific coast zombie apocalypse coordination frequency? I think I will file for squatters rights on 3525.5 for the Alabama Squash Festival Net.

Of course I will park on there with a BC-348 and a T-19 transmitter with an undersized power supply so we can all enjoy the +/- 1 KHz chirp.

Real radios have dynamotors.
« Last Edit: November 05, 2013, 01:59:53 PM by AA4HA » Logged

Ms. Tisha Hayes, AA4HA
Lookout Mountain, Alabama
N1RND
Member

Posts: 57




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« Reply #42 on: November 05, 2013, 03:43:24 PM »

Wow, interesting.  When playing with antennas, etc., I noticed this "phenomena".  Before tuning or loading-up I send a ? and no response.
As I start tuning my antenna or tube rig I start hearing, dit, dit dit.  I send my call sign and hear nothing?
I continue tuning and get more dits with no ID!

Sounds like some ops have way too time on their hands.
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KC4MOP
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Posts: 960




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« Reply #43 on: November 06, 2013, 03:56:09 AM »

My background-what there is of it-is in computers. I am a certified computer tech. I'm also young, I'm 39 in November. I'll go away now...

Most of US and MYSELF are happy you got a license. Sorry that others here have to poke holes into someone's desire to get on the air that isn't an Old Fart coming from the battlefields of old technology.
A thick skin is needed in this hobby
Fred
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AA4HA
Member

Posts: 2630




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« Reply #44 on: November 06, 2013, 05:05:02 AM »

On the original point made by this thread;

Celebrate the idea that you can have a snazzy, multi-processor SDR and still communicate with someone running a radio built in 1935. Sure it may have some challenges but putting it into the perspective of computers, where else could you have that much cross compatibility?

Both systems are state-of-the-art for their day. The fact that something so old can still be maintained and put on the air is a little miracle in its own right.

A boatanchor owner may gripe about the rising cost of a 3TF7 ballast tube used in an R-390A or the horrors of BBOD (black beauties of death) capacitors but we can still get that radio working by our own skills, sweat and solder.

I too have plenty of modern gear like an FT-857d but I suspect that in 20 years when a custom FPGA (field programmable gate array) in that radio goes out I will not be able to scrounge through a parts box to get it on the air.
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Ms. Tisha Hayes, AA4HA
Lookout Mountain, Alabama
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