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Author Topic: Choosing my first boat angchor, Kenwood or Yaesu HF rig  (Read 28918 times)
GW3OQK
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Posts: 446




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« Reply #15 on: December 07, 2013, 07:23:06 AM »

Hello guys!
What IS the dividing line between boat anchors and just old radios? (I was out of touch with amateur radio between 1962 and 2002)

For me separate tx & rx work well, and seem simpler than a combined tx/rx. And full break-in is important so I use separate antennas and desensitise with key back contact. Netting slows you down, but that was life in the old vfo days.

I'd have to build a bigger shack for the Oceanspan, though I do have part of a WS53.
Andrew
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G3RZP
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Posts: 1225




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« Reply #16 on: December 07, 2013, 02:18:46 PM »

Looking back through the handbooks and magazines, full BK used to be pretty rare in amateur operation. A few traffic handlers in the US went for it, as did commercial operators, but in general, it's pretty much a case that it is only in the last 10 or 15 years that full BK has started to get popular with amateurs. Personally, I don't like it, and prefer straight key controlled changeover with a few hundred milliseconds delay in going back to receive. While 'back contacts' on a key don't go with my mechanical bug keys ( which are anathema, I know, to UK maritime ops!)

When the receiving and transmitting stations were many miles apart - as for UK maritime coast stations - it was much easier..... remote controlled receivers at Somerton, transmitters at Leafield or Rugby... well over 100 miles separation.

One biggish problem with separate antennas is making sure the receiver is protected against too much input - my top band loop provided 80 volts from the vertical 75 feet away with 400 watts.

In maritime practice, separate antennas were needed where a full duplex telephony service was required, or, as in naval vessels, where several receivers used the same antenna.
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N2DTS
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« Reply #17 on: December 09, 2013, 10:18:32 AM »

I see no attraction at all in old Japanese ssb gear, and it has to be 100 pounds or close to be a boat anchor.

I have had that old stuff, and it gets older quickly, having to tune everything up for a change in frequency.
I thought the kWM2a , the KWS-1, the ft101, the ft102, and all the others were just poor radios.

The only old radios that were actually better then the new ones are the ones made for AM.
Better receive fidelity with most, and lots more power out then the 20 watts you get with an ssb rig on AM.

An old ssb rig is just a complex box full of very old parts waiting to fail, that never worked very well to start with.

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G3RZP
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Posts: 1225




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« Reply #18 on: December 09, 2013, 12:07:14 PM »

Depends how old you count as a boat anchor. The last generation (1979 - 84) of tube transceivers were appreciably better on high order transmitter intermodulation products (splatter) than modern SS PAs. The FT102 rx performance is way up there with anything that is NEEDED by Joe Q. Ham, even on 40m in Europe. Going back to '60s and '70s, it's generally a labour of love and they weren't as good - the Swan 'drifty three fifty' and the Hammarlund 'drifty 50' (HX50)  and so on come to mind.
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KG8LB
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Posts: 408




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« Reply #19 on: April 02, 2014, 09:30:12 AM »

I would look at the Drake TR4-C and R4-C separate Xmit and Rec or you can use the TRC-4 as a stand alone Transceiver.

The Drake was the last of the boat anchors the dividing line between boat anchors and just old radios.

There are also rigs like the Hallicrafters HT-37 transmitter which has SSB and the Hallicrafters SX-111 receiver now that is a real boat anchor.

   While the HT-37 does indeed operate slop-bucket mode , it also works quite well as an AM transmitter . An excellent exciter to use with an amplifier as well . 
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K4PIH
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« Reply #20 on: April 03, 2014, 06:58:46 AM »

Just a personal preference, but if it has transistors I don't consider it a BA. I have a Swan 270B and if you let it warm up for 15 minutes it's actually pretty stable. I have a bench freq counter and the old bird is right on and pretty much stays there once warm. I would also consider the older Drakes and Hallicraters.

A good rule of thumb is if it won't heat the shack then it ain't a boat anchor.

Have Fun Wink
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KG8LB
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Posts: 408




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« Reply #21 on: April 03, 2014, 11:17:45 AM »

Just a personal preference, but if it has transistors I don't consider it a BA. I have a Swan 270B and if you let it warm up for 15 minutes it's actually pretty stable. I have a bench freq counter and the old bird is right on and pretty much stays there once warm. I would also consider the older Drakes and Hallicraters.

A good rule of thumb is if it won't heat the shack then it ain't a boat anchor.

Have Fun Wink

 Yessir !

   I have been quite surprised to see the term boatanchor applied to some of the later appliances . Even a tube final is stretching it a bit from what I have seen .
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KF7CG
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« Reply #22 on: April 08, 2014, 03:21:43 PM »

For a semi-rare or maybe even rare old Japanese boat anchor try the (Henry) (Trio) Kenwood TS511s. Pretty much a contemporary with the Kenwood Twins R599 - T599 and a decent radio for the day though lacking 160 Meters and of course no WARC bands. Made a lot of contacts with a used one once I made it to Advanced back in the 70's.

KF7CG
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K3WEC
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Posts: 260




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« Reply #23 on: April 08, 2014, 08:18:04 PM »

I would look at the Drake TR4-C and R4-C separate Xmit and Rec or you can use the TRC-4 as a stand alone Transceiver.

The Drake was the last of the boat anchors the dividing line between boat anchors and just old radios.

There are also rigs like the Hallicrafters HT-37 transmitter which has SSB and the Hallicrafters SX-111 receiver now that is a real boat anchor.

I agree with the Drake recommendation 100%.
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W7VO
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« Reply #24 on: April 15, 2014, 04:06:43 PM »

I also will push for a Drake C line. You can pretty easily rebuild them, and with the Sherwood mods on the R4C it is a great receiver. More tubes than transistors, so it "almost" qualifies as a true boat anchor.

If you want something more recent, you cannot go wrong with a Kenwood TS-820 either.

73;

Mike, W7VO
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KE0ZU
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« Reply #25 on: April 27, 2014, 06:30:55 AM »

IMHO if there are more than a half a dozen diodes and a transistor or maybe two, it ain't a boat anchor.   Doesn't matter where it came from.   If I were purist there wouldn't be any semis in the radio.  Hybrids were of a particular era and should be self explanatory.    Then came the evolution of  the dark star class of equipment we enjoy today.

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Regards, Mike
https://mikeharrison.smugmug.com/
Pics and bold print are usually links.
WY4J
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Posts: 139




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« Reply #26 on: May 09, 2014, 07:31:58 AM »

I might be wrong but when I first got my ticket, boat anchors were those real large and heavy transmitters/receivers made by Hallcrafters, National, Hammardund, etc. that were affectionatelly nicknamed because of their large dimensions and weight. Never hear a newer rig referred by such an name because it had a couple of tubed finals.

Never considered a 70's and newer tranceiver as a boat achor unless you are sailing a surf board. I have owned a TS-830S since 1981 and there are plenty of newer rigs heavier and larger than mine, e.g. Icom 7800, Kenwood 990, Yaesu FTDX9000 just to name a few.

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W1BR
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Posts: 4179




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« Reply #27 on: May 10, 2014, 09:10:33 AM »

I might be wrong but when I first got my ticket, boat anchors were those real large and heavy transmitters/receivers made by Hallcrafters, National, Hammardund, etc. that were affectionatelly nicknamed because of their large dimensions and weight. Never hear a newer rig referred by such an name because it had a couple of tubed finals.

Never considered a 70's and newer tranceiver as a boat achor unless you are sailing a surf board. I have owned a TS-830S since 1981 and there are plenty of newer rigs heavier and larger than mine, e.g. Icom 7800, Kenwood 990, Yaesu FTDX9000 just to name a few.



I am a purist as well... boat anchor means all tube, not hybrid!  And preferably something with some meat to it.

I have an AR-88 RCA receive that weighs 100 pounds. I consider that to be a boat anchor of the first order. Next inline would be one of two B&W 5100 transmitters in my shack. My SX-101A, HT-32,  SX-16, HQ-150, etc.... are all runner ups.  Anyone with a BC-610 has the honors of being a real Boat Anchor aficionado.  I'm not dissing anyone who collects vintage Japanese hybrid gear, but the term boat anchor implies tube equipment that would suitable for anchoring a battleship.

Pete
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W1JKA
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Posts: 2099




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« Reply #28 on: May 11, 2014, 03:15:42 AM »

Re: K1ZJH

Ham Speak 101: Boat anchor, only small water craft along with diesel and nuclear submarines are classified as Boats and as implied a BC-610 may be a suitable anchor, but any type of SHIP including Battle class is a bit of a stretch.  Wink
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KG8LB
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Posts: 408




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« Reply #29 on: May 16, 2014, 03:28:26 AM »

 As a salesperson at Allied radio in the late 1960s I well recall , the term " Boat Anchor" first came in to use about the time rigs like the Kenwood , Yaesu etc came to market . It was often used by the people who bought imported radio appliances as a disparaging comment regarding the older , larger , heavier radios like DX-100s and SX-101s . At that point the appliance operators considered the old rigs no longer useful and having zero value as RADIOS , therefore relegated to use only as "Boat Anchors"

   Many of the people using those old radios chose to continue using them and as time passed they actually adopted the formerly disparaging comment as a term of endearment . 

  It is now quite amusing to see and hear people with those early hybrid appliances hijack the term . Seems things have gone full circle now . The real boat anchors are still very much in use , as radios .
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