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Author Topic: We Have Another Convert To The Faith  (Read 903 times)
DL8OV
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Posts: 1016




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« on: April 25, 2019, 11:01:00 AM »

At the end of the working day I had a spare twenty minutes so I went online to one of the many software defined radios that we can find on the Internet and listened to some 20m CW. A couple of minutes later a colleague came in who is into the steampunk side of things.

"Cool", she said, "you know how to read that stuff"?

"Sure", I replied, and started writing down the copy as a Russian station worked a ham in France.

She was fascinated as she thought that things like Morse code had died out years ago and loved the fact that it was still around. The chances of this woman getting a ham radio ticket are slim but when it comes to the CW side of things she's hooked.

I left her with a copy of 'The Art and Skill of Radio Telegraphy' and let things simmer over the weekend  Smiley

Peter DL8OV
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K3UIM
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« Reply #1 on: April 25, 2019, 11:04:07 AM »

Needless to say, our prayers go out to the both of you.  Cheesy  Grin
Charlie, K3UIM
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Where you are: I was!
Where I am: You will be!
So be nice to us old fogies!!
KX4QP
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Posts: 265




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« Reply #2 on: April 27, 2019, 05:02:22 PM »

If she's into steampunk, you should be sure to show pictures of hollow-state hardware, especially from the years just after WWI.  Those big tubes and straight keys and copper tubing tank coils and high impedance phones are pretty much where steampunk came from -- and you can still build stuff like that.  The old 47 tubes are more expensive and less performant than a 1960-vintage miniature pentode, but there's just some cachet to emulating the stuff Armstrong invented along the way from the coherer to the radio proximity fuze (a tiny tube radar that could be shot from a gun).
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N8AUC
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Posts: 498




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« Reply #3 on: April 27, 2019, 09:05:26 PM »

At the end of the working day I had a spare twenty minutes so I went online to one of the many software defined radios that we can find on the Internet and listened to some 20m CW. A couple of minutes later a colleague came in who is into the steampunk side of things.

"Cool", she said, "you know how to read that stuff"?

"Sure", I replied, and started writing down the copy as a Russian station worked a ham in France.

She was fascinated as she thought that things like Morse code had died out years ago and loved the fact that it was still around. The chances of this woman getting a ham radio ticket are slim but when it comes to the CW side of things she's hooked.

I left her with a copy of 'The Art and Skill of Radio Telegraphy' and let things simmer over the weekend  Smiley

Peter DL8OV

Well done, Brother Peter!

73 de N8AUC
Eric
(Also a member of "the faith", for over 40 years!)
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K0UA
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« Reply #4 on: April 27, 2019, 09:30:55 PM »

Interesting. I went to a health care facility about 2 weeks ago and was paying the bill when the young female asked about the HF antenna on my truck.  I explained a little with a sentence or two, as I figured a 20 something would not be impressed.  Boy was I wrong. One question led to another and another as her eyes grew wider with each revelation. I mentioned talking to some guys across our continent as I drove in today and her mouth fell open. More and more questions followed. I didn't have anything to give her and I needed to go, but I haven't seen a young person let alone a female so interested in radio in a long time. I have no idea why.
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DL8OV
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« Reply #5 on: April 28, 2019, 03:13:02 AM »

One other thing I should add. Our new convert may not be up to speed when it comes to electrons but she's probably one of the finest mechanical engineers I have ever seen. I'm therefore going to start off with my key and paddle collection rather than the radio side of things and see if she's interested.

Peter DL8OV
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KL7CW
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Posts: 514




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« Reply #6 on: April 28, 2019, 09:49:08 AM »

Peter,
   I have an idea for your "convert".  About 10 years ago I bought some old (around 1900 or before era) telegraph sounders on ebay.  All just worked fine.  I think "your" mechanical engineer would be fascinated listening and watching the sounder.  After awhile hook it up to a bug, another fascinating mechanical contraption.  My most memorable moment in ham radio was my first QSO in 1954.  My second most memorable event was around 2008 when I hooked up one of my ancient sounders to a home built interface device, which I used to convert on air tone Morse code to a DC voltage to drive the sounder.  I was hooked immediately.  My career was in physics and electronics, but if I could choose all over again I think mechanical engineering would be my major.
   USA and Canadian sounders typically have R values of about 4 to possibly 400 ohms.  Not sure what they use in Europe, but one of my UK sounders has something like 400 or 1000 ohms R.  Our US sounders work just fine with 1/4 to 1/2 watt so require something like around 1.5 to perhaps 6 volts for the higher R versions.  W0RW wrote a EHAM article a month or two ago about sounder hook ups.  Also you can go to U tube and search on "telegraph sounder" and see some videos of operating sounders.  I think I even saw a home made sounder on the steampunk site perhaps a decade ago.
           Cheers,    Rick  KL7CW
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PU2OZT
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« Reply #7 on: April 28, 2019, 02:19:10 PM »

https://www.hell-kiel.de/de/hell-entwicklungen/52-nachrichtentechnik/fernschreibgeraete

Another era of fine German Mechanics

Oliver
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W5CPT
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« Reply #8 on: April 28, 2019, 03:45:19 PM »

My cell phone rings in Morse. Having go off in a public place has started many conversations. I don't think it has started any on the path to the hobby.
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N8AUC
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Posts: 498




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« Reply #9 on: April 29, 2019, 07:23:37 AM »

My cell phone rings in Morse. Having go off in a public place has started many conversations. I don't think it has started any on the path to the hobby.

And you may never know if it has.
But, if you want to be able to harvest a crop one day, you first must plant the seeds.

Not all seeds land on fertile soil, some seeds land on rocky soil and are consumed by the birds.
And some of the seeds that do land on fertile soil, will get blown away by the wind before they can take root.
Some people have the interest and ability, and just don't know that this exists any more. They represent the fertile soil.
Some people just dismiss it, thinking they can always just call someone on their cell phone. They represent the rocky soil.

Innocuous things like a morse code ringer on a cell phone, or what Peter did, can be the seeds.

Keep doing what you're doing. You just never know what could result.
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KX4QP
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« Reply #10 on: May 02, 2019, 03:54:17 PM »

Very much not CW, but the checker at the grocery store asked about my HT as I was checking out yesterday.  Not sure what to make of getting no recognition from "like CB only better" -- too young to remember "Convoy," I guess -- but she seemed taken with the idea that "and you can call out on it?!"
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