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Author Topic: The Boat Anchor Market as I See it.  (Read 26702 times)
HFCRUSR
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Posts: 364




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« Reply #15 on: December 08, 2013, 06:23:11 PM »

Well since nothing of the context of my first response to your opinions was responded to, instead comes a photo of my beloved boatanchor in the trash heap, and the subsequent reply was that the busted up rake was worth $2 more than the radio...I have to admit that IS pretty funny and made me smile-but I was beginning to feel the jokes are on me. Dammit I want to talk boatanchors man!
Like I said and meant to convey, I USE this radio regularly, and it is a blast.
I own an r71a and an r75 too. Neither of these radios have ever gotten little snide jabs like this but this radio does. What  am I left to assume?

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Not a ham, but an avid hobbyist in HF world. All things, short of transmit happen in this shack.
HFCRUSR
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Posts: 364




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« Reply #16 on: December 08, 2013, 06:25:04 PM »

explaining the joke.....

Imagine all the hams out there dreaming of owning the rare SX-88 and having heart attacks when they see one being left out for the garbagemen!

The Henny Youngman version:

"Take my SX-88.  Please, take it!"

sorry to have not taken it the way you meant.
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Not a ham, but an avid hobbyist in HF world. All things, short of transmit happen in this shack.
K0OD
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Posts: 3030




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« Reply #17 on: December 08, 2013, 09:13:34 PM »

With any radio but an SX88 that pic wouldn't have been so hilarious.

And provocative, too. If the photo were real, what would be the backstory???

We know that a significant percentage of SX-88s can't be accounted for. XYL involvement? Alien radio abductions? Maybe they're in that murky Oklahoma lake with the 3 teens who disappeared in 1970.
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HFCRUSR
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Posts: 364




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« Reply #18 on: December 08, 2013, 09:23:09 PM »

Yeah but you're wearing it out and what does it have to do with this thread's topic? Stop being jealous Jeff-grow up.
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Not a ham, but an avid hobbyist in HF world. All things, short of transmit happen in this shack.
G3RZP
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Posts: 1321




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« Reply #19 on: December 08, 2013, 11:52:52 PM »

If you count test gear as well, leaving out relatively modern stuff like a Bird Thruline, I'm up to 33. But that includes some quite valuable to collectors stuff, such as a WW2 A Mk III spy set in original suitcase and an MCR1 WW2 portable RX with all its coils - and I don't know if either of them work now.

The HP141 spectrum analyser definitely counts as boat anchor...on weight alone!
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K5RT
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Posts: 332




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« Reply #20 on: December 09, 2013, 09:23:43 AM »

The Boat Anchor market as I see it:
-Non-technical guys:  Looking for a decent radio in working condition at a moderate price.   They want somebody else to have already repaired and cleaned things up.  Are not particular about original finish, new parts or minor mods.

-Technicians and Historical guys:  Looking for mostly unmolested radios that can be restored to near original operating condition.  Would rather have a dirty grimy radio with original dust,  original finish and parts than have an ignorant seller damage things by cleaning with wrong methods and solutions.  Don't do any cleaning beyond dusting the case with a soft dry cloth.

-Experimenters and Hi-Fi guys:  Looking for radios with main components esp. transformers, variable caps, coils, dials, they can tinker with.  Cosmetics and operating condition are secondary.

-Nostalgists, Purists, Collectors:  Looking for particular radios in particular condition and will pay top dollar for "exactly" what they want.  Unpredictable and uncommon.  Don't do anything to the radio beyond dusting with a soft, dry cloth.

The best way to gauge the market:  Check  Ebay sales and completed sales, eHam, QRZed, QTH. 

Warning: Boat Anchor aficionados  are a romantic and friendly bunch.  They don't care for flippers who are out to make a fast buck or who shade the truth about radio condition and who don't at least appreciate the radios and past eras.

Warning #2:  Don't plug any radio into the wall and turn it on unless it has previously been demonstrated to you in working condition. Doing so with unrestored radios can destroy expensive and difficult/impossible to find components like transformers, coils and tubes! 
 

[split from other topic, bill]


You forgot one category. I'm seeing a lot of newcomers to the hobby who think they need to own a boat anchor in order to be accepted. Sadly, a lot of these folks need Elmering before jumping into the boat anchor part of the hobby. I've noticed a lot of newcomers who have little or no electronics knowledge, trying to repair or use tube equipment with little success.

Yes, boat anchors are a great way to learn electronics, but IMO, the newcomers need to be more concerned about getting on the air and developing Operating skills first.

One other thought. I foresee boat anchor prices dropping over the next 10 years or so (along with the ham population). Boat anchors are a part of Amateur Radio history, but they weren't a consumer item that was part of Americana, their collectible value dropping. Boat Anchors will become a very small niche market as the guys who are reliving their childhood dreams moving into assisted care facilities and such.

Sorry for a gloomy view of the future, but I'm just calling it as I see it.

Paul
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AA4HA
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Posts: 2630




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« Reply #21 on: December 09, 2013, 09:51:05 AM »

One other thought. I foresee boat anchor prices dropping over the next 10 years or so (along with the ham population). Boat anchors are a part of Amateur Radio history, but they weren't a consumer item that was part of Americana, their collectible value dropping. Boat Anchors will become a very small niche market as the guys who are reliving their childhood dreams moving into assisted care facilities and such.

Everyone thinks their generation is particularly unique for holding on to tradition. I am still decades away from the assisted care facility but I have an affection for the warm glow of tubes. There are generations younger than me that also are lured into this particular sideline of the hobby.

With so many people parting-out radios on eBay there are the clever ones who are stockpiling pieces and parts to keep their stuff glowing. Certainly there are radios that will hit the trash-heap when we die but how many of our children are going to take our estates and run them through the eBay marketplace and realize that a radio can sell  for $500-$1500. If you want to do your part then find someone to Elmer/mentor so the joy is passed along and make some sort of contingency plans on where your collection is going when you take that dirt-nap.
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Ms. Tisha Hayes, AA4HA
Lookout Mountain, Alabama
N2DTS
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Posts: 967




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« Reply #22 on: December 09, 2013, 10:10:11 AM »

I got into ham radio in the 70's, after CB, which used to be a LOT different...
Started on CW with a brand new hw7 I got from Heathkit over in Philadelphia, then moved up to an HW-101, then did a little voice, but found AM, and started doing that with $10.00 DX-100's, $250.00 30K-1 (SN 9), $400.00 kws-1, $50.00 32V3's, etc.
Used to buy rigs just for parts to play with.

It was all junk mostly, the 30K-1 was good (as are the 32V rigs) but I went home brew, and sold off all the old stuff years ago, for very fair prices, not collector prices.
I have no use for poor performing equipment, and old trouble prone poor performing equipment is not what I want to play with, you ruin resale value if you make it better.

Funny, but on AM, the old stuff worked better then the new stuff does, except for sdr receivers, which is why some guys want the old stuff, but for ssb, even a cheap modern rig is worlds better then the best (kwm2a?) made back then.

The old stuff is good if you want to play with electronics, modern stuff is risky to work on.

I enjoy AM because people talk about radio, how to build them, fix them, improve them, and talking to someone on a Harvey Wells is more interesting then talking about an Icom or other plastic box you plug in and talk into.
Listening on the bands at night, ssb seems to be only politics, guns, jamming, and medical problems...and maybe a bit about how big their amplifier is.

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N4NYY
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Posts: 5224




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« Reply #23 on: December 09, 2013, 10:24:44 AM »

Don't forget the "Flipper". Tries to make a quick buck of a non-working radio. For example, will go to an estate sale and spend good money on an untested and likely not working radio. Then goes on ebay and claim that they do not know nothing about it and does not know how to test it.

To which I always ask, "If you know nothing about it or do not know how to test it, then why did you by it and spend good money?"

They never like that question.
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KB4QAA
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Posts: 3342




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« Reply #24 on: December 09, 2013, 02:05:44 PM »

Don't forget the "Flipper".
Re-read my post, "Warning"


-People who buy BA's because of high prices are called "Speculators".  Smiley

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KA0HCP, ex-KB4QAA Relocated to Ks. April 2019.
N4NYY
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Posts: 5224




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« Reply #25 on: December 09, 2013, 02:12:28 PM »

Don't forget the "Flipper".
Re-read my post, "Warning"


-People who buy BA's because of high prices are called "Speculators".  Smiley



Oh yeah. I love it though, when you ask them why they spent good money on a product that they cannot test and know nothing about.
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N2EY
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« Reply #26 on: December 10, 2013, 07:06:10 AM »

Add "the misguided newcomer/moneysaver". This is the person who has gotten the idea that they can pick up a 30-50 year old rig and put it on the air without a real understanding of just how different such rigs can be from current ones, how to repair them, or what they really need.

I have known far too many hams who bought an older HF SSB transceiver and tried to use it on CW without a narrow filter, AGC off, or RIT, and had a very hard time of it. Or those who bought an older rig that "just needed a little work - a tube or something" and found themselves with a useless piece of junk, because they had neither the time, knowledge or tools to fix it.

Often it is as simple as not having certain concepts. Many hams today have no concept of "warmup time", "zero beating", "tuning up without destroying", etc. I have encountered far too many hams who think that the power rating on a pre-1983 ham rig is the RF OUTPUT rating, rather than the DC INPUT rating! The results are often tragic - imagine what happens to, say, a DX-60 when someone tries to get 90 watts of RF out of a rig meant for 90 watts maximum DC input....it's not pretty.

This ISN'T their fault!
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KC9VZB
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Posts: 73




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« Reply #27 on: December 10, 2013, 10:01:55 AM »

Another group:preppers  The reason I gave my wife for buying an all tube radio and then another was after the emp pulse the solid state rig ain't gona work.But seriously,  I really enjoy trouble shooting more than rag chewing.I got a spark of life out of drake tr3 after figuring every 330k resistor was open.To me its the journey not the destination.I'll probably will use to make a few check ins on am and shelf it.Tr4 is on the way . 
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AA4HA
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« Reply #28 on: December 10, 2013, 10:32:44 AM »

Add "the misguided newcomer/moneysaver". This is the person who has gotten the idea that they can pick up a 30-50 year old rig and put it on the air without a real understanding of just how different such rigs can be from current ones, how to repair them, or what they really need............
...... Or those who bought an older rig that "just needed a little work - a tube or something" and found themselves with a useless piece of junk, because they had neither the time, knowledge or tools to fix it.
And that's the real shame. My father (SK) made do with a VTVM, an old oscilloscope and a Heathkit tube tester. The voltages may be higher but the principles are pretty much the same between tubes and transistors. His electronics skills were not great, his soldering was not that good (that was my job) but he was careful, methodical and patient. If it took him a week to put his station back together he would do it. There were no instant rewards, no jumping on eham or the zed to cry for help, no complicated modeling programs for antennas.
Are these skills beyond modern hams? Well, they are not taught any more but then again the amateurs of the 60's and 70's frequently did not have an electronics technical background unless they served in such a role in the military. The backyard hams did a good job of muddling by for a long time. It is just about how you apply yourself and what your expectations are.
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Ms. Tisha Hayes, AA4HA
Lookout Mountain, Alabama
G3RZP
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Posts: 1321




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« Reply #29 on: December 10, 2013, 10:35:54 AM »

30 years ago, my father bought an FT102, and went SK 6 months later - no connection. That FT102 has been heavily modified by me, is my main HF rig, has the matching remote VFO and speaker, and offers receive RF performance that is more than adequate in terms of IMD, phase noise, sensitivity and selectivity. It isn't light and has a tube PA.

a. Does that count as a boat anchor?

b. If the answer to a)  is Yes, which of the categories do I fall into?
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