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Author Topic: Peavey cardioid microphone made in USA  (Read 12203 times)
K2OWK
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Posts: 1279




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« on: August 22, 2014, 07:46:42 PM »

I have just acquired a Peavey cardioid microphone with a 20 foot mike extension cord. It has printed on it "Made in USA". It has a round head that measures 1  7/8" across and is 7" tall without its connector. It is white with a black screen. It has an on / off switch on the side. I was able to locate the wiring diagram, but it is a standard diagram for Peavey mikes. The Peavey mikes I have looked all have model numbers on them. This one does not. By the description can anyone take a guess as to its model number, or is there a hidden place where I can find one? I believe this is an old vintage mike. I am also going to post this in the boat anchor forum, just in case. Do you thing this would make a good Ham mike?

Thank you

73s

K2OWK
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KB4QAA
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Posts: 3342




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« Reply #1 on: August 22, 2014, 08:31:32 PM »

Any microphone can be used with any radio given proper feedline, impedance matching and preamp/attenuation, as required.
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KA0HCP, ex-KB4QAA Relocated to Ks. April 2019.
K2OWK
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Posts: 1279




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« Reply #2 on: August 22, 2014, 11:54:16 PM »

I realize that any mike can be used for ham radio. I am using a D-104 with the original element on my Yaesu FT-450AT with excellent results. I was just curious if anyone had tried the Peavey mike for ham use, and if so, how it sounded.? It is normally used for commercial music and PA audio.

73s

K2OWK
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KT4AE
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Posts: 13




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« Reply #3 on: August 24, 2014, 05:05:21 AM »

A few years back, when I was fooling with microphones for my Hallicrafters gear I bought three Peavey mikes with 20 foot cables and xlr connectors at a local guitar store mainly to get the cable and connectors.  At around $25 they were cheaper than buying the cable & connectors alone.

The mikes were PV-1100's and fit your description other than the bodies being black rather than white and yours lacking model numbers.   At the time, Peavey also had a higher priced mike with cable.  I don't remember if they had any cheaper or with white bodies.

The frequency response on mine lacked highs and without any EQ they were too muffled.  With a few db of added emphasis in the 2500 cycle range they sounded as good as more expensive mikes I had.  Their output was higher than my other dynamic mikes. The Peaveys were sensitive to vibration from the fan in my HT-32 so they had to be set on foam pads. 

In the end, I settled on other mikes mainly because I'd paid more for them.

Harry, KT4AE
Watkinsville, Georgia
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KT4AE
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Posts: 13




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« Reply #4 on: August 24, 2014, 11:09:31 AM »

By the way, the model number was plainly printed on the body just below where the screen attaches.

Could yours have been repainted?

Harry, KT4AE
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K2OWK
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« Reply #5 on: August 24, 2014, 04:12:15 PM »

I thank everyone for the information. I tested the mike on a audio amplifier, and it sounded pretty good. This mike has a band around the center of the screen which has the mike information printed, but for some reason it looks like the model number was removed and done so very neatly. The white paint looks original. There are no marks on the microphone body that I can see even under magnification. I guess I will use the mike for my tape recorder. It should work really good for that.

73s

K2OWK
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KD0REQ
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« Reply #6 on: August 26, 2014, 01:45:12 PM »

ah.  I suspect then at some time that mike was "hot" in more than frequency response.  without clearly identifying marks, it's not going to find its way back home.  should be smooth across the SSB range, but that mike will go bass-heavy if you close-talk it.  like all those XLR dynamic mikes, unless somebody's fooled with it, pin 1 is case ground, pins 2 and 3 are balanced 150 ohms about 60 down.
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K2OWK
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Posts: 1279




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« Reply #7 on: August 26, 2014, 04:30:34 PM »

I picked this mike up at a Military Vets thrift store. I just purchased an XLR to standard mono mike plug. I should be able to plug it into my old reel to reel tape recorder. Should work good I hope. This mike is heavy and looks very well made. I would imagine it was quite expensive when new.

73s

K2OWK
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W8AAZ
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Posts: 379




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« Reply #8 on: September 01, 2014, 03:57:50 PM »

Pretty much all cardiod mics commonly found will boost the bass if you talk very close to them so they don't sound so great on SSB for that.  Except Electrovoice made some with what is called "variable D" cardiod pickup that is not supposed to have very much bass boost close-up.  Like the 664, which was marketed to hams as well as public address apps.  Those are good for SSB but with the demand for vintage mics now, the prices for nice ones are getting high.  They used to be pretty affordable till the retro crowd rediscovered them. I have tried mics like the Shure SM57/58 for ham use and they are not good SSB mics without EQ, but are great for their intended purpose. 
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