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Author Topic: Yaesu FTDX560 Restoration, adding cooling fan  (Read 16505 times)
K7FRU
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Posts: 32




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« on: March 04, 2014, 04:24:18 PM »

I'm restoring an FTDX-560 all tube transceiver.  The finals cage gets really hot and I'd like to add a cooling fan.

On the main transformer there is 6.3VAC.  I'd like to tap into that and convert it to DC using a bridge rectifier, then run it through a 5v regulator to run a brushless 5v fan.  The fan is rated at 360ma.

The 6.3 line is also used for the heaters.  Is this setup a wise choice (tapping into the 6.3vac line)?  I know I can buy 110v AC fans, but I really want to have a regulated 5vdc source in this rig for other reasons if I can.

Thanks for any suggestions, 73.

-Tyler
k7fru
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KB4QAA
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Posts: 3342




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« Reply #1 on: March 05, 2014, 12:01:53 PM »

Check the amperage draw on the fan, but I doubt it is much compared to the filament requirements, so no problem.  

Why bother with a voltage regulator for a fan?  
-Follow standard power supply practices; put a series resistor for load/voltage dropping and paralleled capacitor for smoothing...  
-Refer to any electronics textbook for sample circuits or reverse engineer the circuits from similar devices (google is your friend).
-Another source is the Bama Mirror  http://bama.edebris.com/manuals/

** You really should start your education/search with the legendary Fox Tango International group
http://foxtango.org/foxtango001.htm

There probably isn't an idea or problem that hasn't already been addressed or solved by the FT group in the last 45 years.
« Last Edit: March 05, 2014, 12:05:22 PM by KB4QAA » Logged

KA0HCP, ex-KB4QAA Relocated to Ks. April 2019.
K7FRU
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Posts: 32




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« Reply #2 on: March 05, 2014, 12:58:31 PM »

Thanks for the info.  In all of my searching I didn't even notice the Fox Tango group.  I joined!

I plan on using a smoothing capacitor.  This is my first rectifier circuit build so I'm still learning, just trying to get my ducks in a row and make sure I have a good input source.  I'm wanting to use a regulator because this will also be powering a small (low consumption) microcontroller that requires a regulated input.  The microcontroller will host a thermistor in the finals cage to control the fan (I do a lot of SWL'ing, and I don't want/need the fan running all of the time.  Also, I mainly want to do this just to do it).

The fan + microcontroller should be well under 500ma (fan is rated at 360ma).  I'll scan through the Fox Tango group to see what others have done.

73
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K7KB
Member

Posts: 797




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« Reply #3 on: March 05, 2014, 01:28:54 PM »

Good luck on your restoration Tyler! My first transceiver I purchased as a teen after getting my General was the FTDX-560. It was a good radio and I worked a lot of DX during my younger days. I've always been a Yaesu fan also owning a FT-102 and now my FTDX-5000.

John K7KB
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K7FRU
Member

Posts: 32




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« Reply #4 on: March 05, 2014, 01:48:46 PM »

Thank you!  I sure do like this radio.  It truly is a boat anchor, not too easy to pick up and move around.  It came to me in decent shape (the cabinet had rust spots, needed new electrolytics, couple of switches needed deoxit, etc) but overall it hasn't been too much work.  I spent more time refinishing the cabinet than anything else.  I love the smell of the tubes and the receive is excellent.  After I get the fan installed I only have a few more tweaks before it sits as my main radio.

Here are some pictures:





73!

-Tyler
k7fru
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WB2WIK
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Posts: 21837




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« Reply #5 on: March 05, 2014, 03:48:38 PM »

Fans that have a thermostatic controller built right into the fan hub are cheap, although most are 12Vdc and not 5Vdc.

Here's one for ten bucks, built in thermostatic control: http://www.xoxide.com/gelid-120mmsilentcasefan.html

It only draws 180 mA at 12V.  You could build an unregulated doubler from the filament supply (two diodes, two capacitors) which would deliver ~16Vdc unregulated and should work for this fan.
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K7FRU
Member

Posts: 32




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« Reply #6 on: March 05, 2014, 04:35:06 PM »

Ah, that's a great idea.  I already have parts on order unfortunately (only spent around $19 on all of the parts, including the microcontroller).

I have another one of these old Yaesu's I'm restoring next and I'll be using your idea!

73
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K8AXW
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Posts: 7042




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« Reply #7 on: March 05, 2014, 06:09:07 PM »

An old guy that I used to Elmer bought an FTDX-560.  It was a beautiful transceiver and worked great.  The major problem was that it used sweep tubes for the finals. 

The owner, being old as I mentioned, was very slow in tuning this rig.  Consequently, he would get the final tubes so hot the envelopes would melt in against the elements. 

So the point here is to be quick on the tuning!  Hope you can find tubes if you need them!  Good luck on your find.

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A Pessimist is Never Disappointed!
G3RZP
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Posts: 1321




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« Reply #8 on: March 06, 2014, 02:35:43 AM »

If you haven't already got spare PA (or even other) tubes,  get some while you can.
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W8JI
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Posts: 9748


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« Reply #9 on: March 06, 2014, 05:41:59 AM »


If you run the tubes wrong, they will break fast with extra air or not. If you run it properly, it will last just as long with or without a fan on the PA tubes.

The fan mostly makes you feel better.
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K7FRU
Member

Posts: 32




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« Reply #10 on: March 06, 2014, 08:35:16 AM »

I've been running tube gear for the past couple of years, so I have the tuning process down.  Usually only takes me several short (2-3 second) bursts to get it tuned up per the manual.

Yeah those sweep tubes sure are expensive.  I'm considering swapping them out at some point for a cheaper alternative.  I figure keeping them cool sure couldn't hurt, and as long as I'm gentle with them they should last for years.


73
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KF7CG
Member

Posts: 1215




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« Reply #11 on: March 07, 2014, 09:31:50 AM »

I remember when the sweep tubes were the cheaper alternative. I used the Henry (Trio) Kenwood parallel to the FTdx-560, the TS-511s. It also had sweep tube finals and was a great rig. WOuld love to find one again closeby for a decent price. Those units appear to be rare and don't live in TN.

The Kenwood came with a fan. Use and enjoy, those old rig were solid.

KF7CG
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KB0TJ
Member

Posts: 24




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« Reply #12 on: March 17, 2014, 10:12:27 PM »

I'm restoring an FTDX-560 all tube transceiver.  The finals cage gets really hot and I'd like to add a cooling fan.

On the main transformer there is 6.3VAC.  I'd like to tap into that and convert it to DC using a bridge rectifier, then run it through a 5v regulator to run a brushless 5v fan.  The fan is rated at 360ma.

The 6.3 line is also used for the heaters.  Is this setup a wise choice (tapping into the 6.3vac line)?  I know I can buy 110v AC fans, but I really want to have a regulated 5vdc source in this rig for other reasons if I can.

Thanks for any suggestions, 73.

-Tyler
k7fru
I just looked at the schematic and it looks like all you need is one generic 2A 30v-60v Diode for a single half wave rectifier.  Not sure why you think you'd need a FW bridge... one end of both of the 6v3 windings are grounded.
Do a little homework on where you'd use a FWB.
In this application, a half wave rectifier with a 16,000uF 16v cap is probably more then good enough.
If you want to use this DC voltage source for something else at 5V, you'll possibly need a regulator and better filtering.
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W8JI
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« Reply #13 on: March 18, 2014, 03:13:16 AM »

I've been running tube gear for the past couple of years, so I have the tuning process down.  Usually only takes me several short (2-3 second) bursts to get it tuned up per the manual.

Yeah those sweep tubes sure are expensive.  I'm considering swapping them out at some point for a cheaper alternative.  I figure keeping them cool sure couldn't hurt, and as long as I'm gentle with them they should last for years.


73

Keeping tubes cool certainly won't hurt. It just will not slow down wear of the tubes. They will electrically wear at the same rate, provided you don't melt something like the glass.

Circulating air will slow deterioration of everything around the tubes that is sensitive to heat, like phenolic materials or low temperature insulation. Extra cooling is a good idea for other parts, like carbon resistors, electrolytics, rubber or plastic wires or insulation, or phenolic materials.
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