Call Search
     

New to Ham Radio?
My Profile

Community
Articles
Forums
News
Reviews
Friends Remembered
Strays
Survey Question

Operating
Contesting
DX Cluster Spots
Propagation

Resources
Calendar
Classifieds
Ham Exams
Ham Links
List Archives
News Articles
Product Reviews
QSL Managers

Site Info
eHam Help (FAQ)
Support the site
The eHam Team
Advertising Info
Vision Statement
About eHam.net

donate to eham
   Home   Help Search  
Pages: [1]   Go Down
  Print  
Author Topic: PSK31: Digipan-specific questions  (Read 4838 times)
WA7IRY
Member

Posts: 64




Ignore
« on: January 14, 2007, 08:22:09 PM »

I'm just now getting into PSK31 and have a few questions about operating technique, not necessarily the technology.  I'm using an old TS-830s transceiver, a Signalink + interface, and Digipan 2.0 software.  I think I've gotten the hardware set up correctly because everything operates as the manuals say they should.  

When using Digipan, for example, I can set my transceiver to exactly 7070.0 and see several PSK31 signals on the waterfall display.  I can click on any of them and also copy them perfectly in the receive window.  

When the waterfall display shows a signal at, say, 1.5khz, and another one at 2.2khz, does this mean that they're actually transmitting on 7071.5khz and 7072.2khz respectively?  OR are the 1.5kh and 2.2kz frequencies displayed on the waterfall simply the the PSK tones that they're transmitting via SSB on 7070.0?

If the station shown on the display at 1.5khz is "CQ-ing" and I want to reply, do I need to adjust my transciever to 7071.5khz, or simply click on his signal in the waterfall display, then transmit with my transceiver still set to 7070.0?  

How do I avoid QRMing someone else who's also set to 7070.0?  For example, if I select the waterfall display signal that's at 1.5khz and transmit to this guy, am I QRMing the other guy whose signal appears at 2.2khz?

I've RTFMed the Digipan manual and other generic PSK31 material but can't find anything that specifically addresses these questions.  Any help appreciated...

Thanks,
Rod
WA7IRY
Logged
AA4PB
Member

Posts: 15066




Ignore
« Reply #1 on: January 15, 2007, 07:05:26 AM »

On a SSB transmitter, when you inject a single tone you get a single RF output frequency. For example, if the radio dial (the suppressed carrier frequency) is set to 7070.0KHz and you inject a 1.5KHz tone you output a single frequency of 7071.5KHz. If you inject a 2.2KHz tone your RF output is 7072.2KHz. This is for USB mode. On LSB the audio tones subtract from the dial instead of adding to it.

When you answer a CQ, leave the transmitter dial alone. Just click on the waterfall and start answering. It is best to stay away from the outside edges of the waterfall. This will generate tones too low or too high for the filters in the radio, most noticably resulting in low power output. I'd stay about 500Hz inside the edges for best results. If a station is too close to the edge, just retune the radio's dial a little to move the signal towards the center of the waterfall.
Logged

Bob  AA4PB
Garrisonville, VA
WA7IRY
Member

Posts: 64




Ignore
« Reply #2 on: January 15, 2007, 01:30:46 PM »

Thanks for your reply.  It's exactly the explanation I was looking for!

73,
-- Rod
Logged
WA7IRY
Member

Posts: 64




Ignore
« Reply #3 on: January 25, 2007, 02:41:12 AM »

Does anyone know if Digipan has any sort of program function or macro for a CQ-beacon?
 
I'm just getting started on PSK31 with Digipan and like it a lot.  Still, it'd be nice to be able to toggle a beacon mode while doing other things in the shack.  I frequently do this with CW-Type while monitoring a seemingly dead band.  I can set the speaker up a bit louder and wheel my chair over a bit to work on other projects in the shack.  When (if) I get a response, I cancel the beacon and make the QSO.  I'd really like to be able to do this with Digipan.

If there's no such program function or canned macro, has anyone programmed a custom macro to do this?  I've RTFM'ed the Digipan help files and can't find any specific reference to a timing function that you could use in a macro, where you'd transmit a "cq.txt" file, then wait a specified number of seconds, then loop back to the start.

Ideas??

73,
Rod WA7IRY


Logged
KE0MS
Member

Posts: 10




Ignore
« Reply #4 on: February 09, 2007, 12:05:36 PM »

On your TS-830S, I'd very interested in hearing how you interface your psk31 modem unit to your radio... Do you use the speaker jack for receive audio and the two "signal" pins on the mic plug for input(transmit)?  

Sorry to sound so dumb, but I'm very new to this too, and using a Kenwood TS-530S.

This is a great discussion for me.  Thanks!
Logged
WA7IRY
Member

Posts: 64




Ignore
« Reply #5 on: February 11, 2007, 01:24:47 PM »

>>On your TS-830S, I'd very interested in hearing how you interface your psk31 modem unit to your radio... Do you use the speaker jack for receive audio and the two "signal" pins on the mic plug for input(transmit)? <<

>>Sorry to sound so dumb, but I'm very new to this too, and using a Kenwood TS-530S. <<

>>This is a great discussion for me. Thanks!<<

That's not dumb.  I had to ask the same questions locally just a few months ago when I was getting set up for digital operation.  ;-)

Anyway, I'm using a Tigertronics Signalink SL+1 interface.  This is a well-made unit that comes with very complete documentation and is bonehead simple to set up.  (Simple is GOOD...  ;-)

Basically, it connects as you mentioned.  The SL+1 comes with an interface cable that connects to the TS-830s mic connector.  You connect another cable from the 830s audio output to the SL+1.  The interface is then connected via separatge cables to your computer sound card's audio in and output connections.  

You control the input and output gain via Windows sound card level adjustments.  (Control Panel | Sounds & Audio Devices | Audio | Sound Playback and Sound Recording).  Once you get the gains adjusted there, you can fine-tune with your 830s mic gain and volume control for transmit output power and receive gain respectively.  

You've got a lot of choices for software, but Digipan is hard to beat.  It's not only free, but easy to use and understand for a digital noob (like me).  

By the way, Tigertronics has a new model of the Signalink available called the Signalink USB.  It contains its own soundcard and connects to your PC via a USB port.  When I ordered mine over the Christmas holiday period, they were backordered on the USB model so I opted for standard SL+1 unit, which uses the PC sound card.  If I had it to do over, I'd get the USB model.  The SL+1 works well, but USB connectivity between rig and PC would probably be bit simpler and cleaner (fewer cables).  You also wouldn't have to contend with the differences between all the various PC sound cards out there.

Anyway, hope this info helps.  If you go with a Signalink, you won't be disappointed.

73,
-- Rod  WA7IRY
Logged
KE0MS
Member

Posts: 10




Ignore
« Reply #6 on: February 11, 2007, 07:08:14 PM »

Hey Rod,

Thanks for the explanation.  I do in-fact have a Tigertronics USB on order!  So, this should be a piece of cake when it arrives.  I have cables ordered for my TS-530S, my TS-440S and my Icom 706mkIIG... Should be fun on at least one radio.  Smiley

Thanks for the info.

Wayne
Logged
WA7IRY
Member

Posts: 64




Ignore
« Reply #7 on: February 11, 2007, 10:06:29 PM »

Excellent!  You won't be sorry.

Enjoy your new mode...

73,
-- Rod   WA7IRY
Logged
Pages: [1]   Go Up
  Print  
 
Jump to:  

Powered by MySQL Powered by PHP Powered by SMF 1.1.11 | SMF © 2006-2009, Simple Machines LLC Valid XHTML 1.0! Valid CSS!