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Author Topic: When did Elmer die?  (Read 172920 times)
N4KD
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Posts: 194




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« Reply #30 on: November 04, 2014, 12:28:01 PM »

Quote
When did Elmer die?

It was either during duck season or rabbit season.

I bet it was "wabbit" season.  Grin

Elmer? He shoulda made a left turn at Albuquerque.

I agree with the others... Shop around until you find a club that suits you.

vy 73,
Dave N4KD
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SMAUG
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« Reply #31 on: December 14, 2014, 04:33:04 AM »

My club is expensive, $40 a year. My club's officers maintain the point of view that the primary purpose of Field Day is to introduce amateur radio, especially HF, to the great unlicensed public.

We moved our Field Day site this past year, and the top consideration was how visible it would be for passing foot traffic and how attractive it would be for would-be hams.

Most members of the club are friendly and will pause to answer a question.

One member heard of my plight when setting up a VHF/UHF antenna outside. He came over the next day with two different antenna analyzers, and gave me lots of his time, asking nothing in return.

The club has over 220 members, most of whom don't seem to be active.  Huh  Maybe they just want to be able to use any of the club repeaters, guilt-free.

****

Be careful that you don't view the whole club negatively just because one guy has lost sight of what's important. If the whole club is like that, then yeah, it's time to move on.
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Jeremy (KC9ZHE)
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"America will never be destroyed from the outside. If we falter and lose our freedoms, it will be because we destroyed ourselves."
-Abraham Lincoln
K8PRG
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« Reply #32 on: February 08, 2015, 06:59:42 AM »

I guess I'm one of the lucky ones....I told my Elmer that I was getting pretty comfortable with copying 13 wpm, and had been practicing with the straight key. I'm getting close to working on my first QSO, but I better practice with someone first.....he told me to let him know when I'm ready...he said "we'll do 3, 5, 10 words a minute, what ever you want...we're both retired so we have all day".
He also helped me get my dipole in the air.
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KD8IIC
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« Reply #33 on: February 11, 2015, 12:02:11 AM »

 You're ready to get your fist on the air right now. Don't be shy or skeerd, It's part of the thrill of that first QSO  Smiley. Yes, you will mess up a little, beeg deal, but the memory will last a lifetime! Enjoy it...  73
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KC2QYM
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« Reply #34 on: February 12, 2015, 09:02:06 AM »

There are few real elmers still around...but they are rare.  There used to be more but here are a few reasons why there aren't that many around:

- Many real gentlemen elmers have passed on to become SKs

- Those that were elmers earlier in life have become old men without any patience left for guys that don't want to try to figure things out for themselves.

- Some guys who were elmers have found it lucrative to charge newcomers money for parts, repairs, etc. No more free fixing for guys that don't pick up a book or research a problem first.

- Many hams are applinace operators today, they can even buy wire antennas without even trying to build a simple dipole.  Why waste your knowledge on such dolts.

Ham radio is filled with its own folklore and nostalgia.  Even some myths and lies which we are supposed accept as those great magic days of yore.  Ask anyone what that stupid old ARRL wooden shaft thing is...what do they call it..a Wuffhong, wonghung, whatever they call it.  What's that for?  Who cares?
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K8PRG
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« Reply #35 on: February 12, 2015, 10:30:36 AM »

You're ready to get your fist on the air right now. Don't be shy or skeerd, It's part of the thrill of that first QSO  Smiley. Yes, you will mess up a little, beeg deal, but the memory will last a lifetime! Enjoy it...  73

Thanks for the words of encouragement...I'll be looking for ya soon......I hope you can find me before KC2QYM does....sounds like that would be a QSO I would never forget alright.... Grin
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N6PG
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Posts: 206




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« Reply #36 on: February 14, 2015, 03:33:16 PM »

Hello all,

I'm not a young guy, but I am relatively new to AR. I have been learning CW pretty much on my own, since the club CW guys like to see themselves as elite and anyone who can't do 30 wpm or doesn't know everything about being a CW op is just a LID.
They don't seem to have any interest in reducing the "LID population" by teaching or mentoring, either.

On field day , I got yelled at for not jumping on a CW CQ fast enough by one of the elite. The fact of the matter was that I simply wanted to listen for a second time to make sure I got the call correct. They were 20-30 WPM exchanges which were a stretch for me to copy.
When did all of this stop being fun and become a blood sport?

Elmer must have been a great guy, but I am yet to meet him. Has he passed on?

You should feel sorry for this guy. It's difficult to not take it personally, but he is clearly a troubled person.  A comment like that can really set one back. Rest assured, there are many hams standing by to help.  People like that need to be talked to....
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KE7VE
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« Reply #37 on: February 15, 2015, 09:36:31 PM »

Elmer never existed. He was made up just like Santa Claus, and I'm not interested in being Santa for you or your Elmer.

In the world there are children, who I will show and teach anything I know to. There are adults who I expect to learn and teach things to themselves. Then there are "children" who have large bodies and pretend to be adults except when they want the free benefit of the work and knowledge I have acquired.

I have built three houses, done everything from the ASTM soil testing and designing the foundation to framing , wiring, plumbing, dry wall, roofing and all the finish work.

Do you know of some reason I should spend my time showing you how to do all this? It's not enough to say you share an interest in having a house along with me.

I have rebuilt more motorcycle and car engines than I can count. Any reason I should invite you to use my garage and the thousands of dollars of my tools and give you my knowledge so you can fix/rebuilt your vehicle? Yes, we share an interest. So what?

A long time ago I learned the code and basic electronics so I could get an amateur radio license by myself. Later I needed to find a way to pay for going to college and getting 2 degrees in geology, so what I did was pay money to learn electronics in greater depth so I could make a living at it. It was a good investment and allowed me to make enough money to become a petroleum exploration geologist. I did well and actually took a cut in pay to first work as a geologist.

Do you see some reason I should teach you Geology, or Ham Radio, or Electronics? If you are an adult, do it yourself.

Do you see a mentor/Elmer somewhere in here. I don't. What I can do I taught/learned myself so I could eat and live like I wanted to.

Elmers never existed, if they had, they would be NO schools, colleges or universities.

You want to know about something, do it yourself. I have myself and a family to take care of.............and through my taxes evidently a lot of other dead weight.

BTW I have taught scores of cub scouts how to identify rocks, minerals and fossils and the basic principles of electricity along with doing JOTA. These were kids, not adults who act like kids.

Elmer is your excuse for not doing it yourself, grow up.

Consider if the OP ended stating this:

"What I learned at field day was I was really not competent enough to operate a CW contest station and what I'm going to do is practice and get very very good at this so it will never happen again."





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W5FRR
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« Reply #38 on: February 16, 2015, 10:21:09 AM »

Elmer never existed. He was made up just like Santa Claus, and I'm not interested in being Santa for you or your Elmer.

We already have enough angry, old, curmudgeons in amateur radio to fill the quota.

My biggest hope is that you are bitter and selfish enough to not belong to any club, organization, or participate in any activity interacting with the public.  It is best that others don't see your attitude and misinterpret it as what amateur radio is all about.
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Dave
W5FRR - The Voice of Frontier Ranger Ranch!
KK5DR
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« Reply #39 on: February 16, 2015, 06:00:55 PM »

"Smooth is fast, perfection is smooth."
First, learn to send perfect code, regardless of the speed sent.
A clean and precise fist is a thing of beauty.
As you gain more experiance, the speed will build, but always keep it clean, and well formed.
Those out there that copy your code will find it easy to copy, and as your speed builds, they too, will follow.
It's one thing to send code at 30+pm, but it isn't worth a darn if it's sent badly.
Strive to be a surgeon with your sending, clean and precise.
Work you way up in the speed.
Get on the air, best practice you can ever do.
When I begain as as a ham, I would spend hours copying code, sending code, making QSOs.
I would practice off the air too, sending code from a practice oscillator into a code reading PC program, striving for perfect copy on the PC.
I would also listen to the ARRL practice transmissions, which are computer sent and perfect.
There are those that will say you need to hear bad code too. I say you need the benchmark referance to start, so you can deal with the bad sending more easily.
This is just my opinion, you may, or may not use it as you wish.
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W9FIB
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« Reply #40 on: February 16, 2015, 08:49:04 PM »

RJR does make some good points. However they are valid only to a point. I don't think his definition of an Elmer is correct.

I look at it this way. You can have all the degrees the university has to offer. Does that automatically make you an expert? If you say yes, then you are simply being dishonest with yourself. Trust me, I went through that myself. It took me a while to understand that a degree alone was no guaranty of success. It is what you learn after you get the degree, and the ability to use it that separates the talented from the wannabes.

I had a classmate in college that got much better grades then me. But he was dumber then a box of rocks when it came time to apply what he learned. The last I knew he was going around cleaning copy machines for a living. Not a bad job, but what is he really using from his education. Not much.

But if you take that first job, apply yourself, watch those with far more experience, ask questions when you don't know; you will soon discover that your education may have gotten you in the door, but your ability to continue to learn from others will help you excel. While that type of experience is not often referred to as being "Elmered", it is just that.

Now the same applies to HR. You study and get a license. You begin in the hobby and suddenly you run into a problem and you can't figure it out. So you talk with other hams and they point you in the right direction. Guess what; you just got Elmered! And the person that pointed for you was an Elmer. No fanfare. No money changing hands. No ego trips. Just a few words from 1 ham to another.

That to me is the beauty of it. No need for a formal contract. No need to be called an Elmer. No need to call someone an Elmer. Just the simplest thing humans can do for each other. Just talk about something and gain a little wisdom.

Sometimes people here are Elmers and they don't even know it. I can't tell you how many times I have read threads here that looked interesting and learned something from those that took the time to write.

When did Elmer die? I really don't think he/she did. It may no longer be as formal or personal as it used to be. But a bit of information written in a forum that is read by many may help more then just the one. So anyone who gains some knowledge from another has been Elmered. And it is not dead, or the posted questions would never get answered.

Now getting back to RJR's comment that there never has been an Elmer, is just plain wrong. But I would bet somewhere along the line he must have asked a question of the more experienced somewhere in his career. So he was Elmered and didn't even know it.
« Last Edit: February 16, 2015, 08:51:56 PM by W9FIB » Logged

73, Stan
Wisdom is knowledge you gain after you know it all.
KD8IIC
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« Reply #41 on: February 16, 2015, 11:39:49 PM »

 FFR : Well put OM!  ....  Could not have said it better...   73
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K8PRG
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« Reply #42 on: February 17, 2015, 05:11:28 AM »

Do all Geologists live and work in caves all by themselves?  Grin
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N6PG
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« Reply #43 on: February 17, 2015, 10:28:24 PM »




Do you see some reason I should teach you Geology, or Ham Radio, or Electronics? If you are an adult, do it yourself.

Do you see a mentor/Elmer somewhere in here. I don't. What I can do I taught/learned myself so I could eat and live like I wanted to.

Elmers never existed, if they had, they would be NO schools, colleges or universities.

You want to know about something, do it yourself. I have myself and a family to take care of.............and through my taxes evidently a lot of other dead weight.

BTW I have taught scores of cub scouts how to identify rocks, minerals and fossils and the basic principles of electricity along with doing JOTA. These were kids, not adults who act like kids.

Elmer is your excuse for not doing it yourself, grow up.

Consider if the OP ended stating this:

"What I learned at field day was I was really not competent enough to operate a CW contest station and what I'm going to do is practice and get very very good at this so it will never happen again."







This isn't for work. It's a hobby. Nobody expects you to teach anybody anything. I'm grateful for those that have helped me. I generally try and do everything myself... But I've really benefited from people kind enough to post on youtube. I like working on my car, but I'm not a mechanic. I read and research... But it's still saved me countless hours when someone guides me. I remember that, and I try to pass it on. If someone is too lazy to put in any effort, that's a different story.
IMHO.
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KY6M
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« Reply #44 on: February 18, 2015, 08:06:04 AM »

This thread demonstrates how selfish young people grow into nasty old people. But in the end, those nasty old people (NOP for short) die surrounded by their ham gear, now they generously donate their gear to the world, maybe in that somebody will profit from their life of selfishness.
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