Call Search
     

New to Ham Radio?
My Profile

Community
Articles
Forums
News
Reviews
Friends Remembered
Strays
Survey Question

Operating
Contesting
DX Cluster Spots
Propagation

Resources
Calendar
Classifieds
Ham Exams
Ham Links
List Archives
News Articles
Product Reviews
QSL Managers

Site Info
eHam Help (FAQ)
Support the site
The eHam Team
Advertising Info
Vision Statement
About eHam.net

donate to eham
   Home   Help Search  
Pages: Prev 1 2 [3] 4 5 Next   Go Down
  Print  
Author Topic: Is 500 Watts worth the cost?  (Read 89324 times)
N1UK
Member

Posts: 2243




Ignore
« Reply #30 on: August 17, 2014, 12:51:47 PM »

Quote
Where it does make a big difference is for DXing on 160 and to some extent, 80.

Agreed but try breaking a big DX pileup on 40m with 100 watts..you will be there all night and probably go to bed disappointing.


Mark N1UK
Logged
KC4MOP
Member

Posts: 960




Ignore
« Reply #31 on: August 18, 2014, 04:36:37 AM »

I would say besides increasing power that the antenna is the next piece of hardware that has to be up to the task.
A shortened/loaded dipole 25 feet from the ground is not going to help with increased power. 80M and 160M need the most attention to detail and can not be compromised very much. 40M becomes easier to get on the air with a respectable signal.
Fred
Logged
NA4IT
Member

Posts: 194


WWW

Ignore
« Reply #32 on: August 18, 2014, 06:27:49 AM »

Your antenna makes more difference than the amp. I live in a RF quiet location. I have full size dipoles for all bands. I can work pretty much everything I can hear... with 100 watts... or less.
Logged
W8JX
Member

Posts: 13268




Ignore
« Reply #33 on: August 18, 2014, 09:00:02 AM »

Your antenna makes more difference than the amp. I live in a RF quiet location. I have full size dipoles for all bands. I can work pretty much everything I can hear... with 100 watts... or less.

While antenna is a important factor, a amp is a important factor on 40 and below. I live in a rural RF quiet area but I have had many day time 40m chats that would have been very difficult or impossible without amps on both ends. On 20 and above a amp is not as critical.
Logged

--------------------------------------
Ham since 1969....  Old School 20wpm REAL Extra Class..
KM4AH
Member

Posts: 963




Ignore
« Reply #34 on: August 18, 2014, 10:21:28 AM »

Your antenna makes more difference than the amp. I live in a RF quiet location. I have full size dipoles for all bands. I can work pretty much everything I can hear... with 100 watts... or less.

While antenna is a important factor, a amp is a important factor on 40 and below. I live in a rural RF quiet area but I have had many day time 40m chats that would have been very difficult or impossible without amps on both ends. On 20 and above a amp is not as critical.

I don't know that being able to work somebody has ever been the problem on 40 or 75 unless they are on the fringe of propagation. The problem is that you can hear each other fine until somebody running 1500 watts shows up two kilohertz away. Not necessarily any malice involved, just that if you are weak they assume they won't bother you since you won't bother them. So, somebody or two in the group needs to run an amp in self defense.
Logged
W8JX
Member

Posts: 13268




Ignore
« Reply #35 on: August 18, 2014, 10:36:39 AM »

Your antenna makes more difference than the amp. I live in a RF quiet location. I have full size dipoles for all bands. I can work pretty much everything I can hear... with 100 watts... or less.

While antenna is a important factor, a amp is a important factor on 40 and below. I live in a rural RF quiet area but I have had many day time 40m chats that would have been very difficult or impossible without amps on both ends. On 20 and above a amp is not as critical.

I don't know that being able to work somebody has ever been the problem on 40 or 75 unless they are on the fringe of propagation. The problem is that you can hear each other fine until somebody running 1500 watts shows up two kilohertz away. Not necessarily any malice involved, just that if you are weak they assume they won't bother you since you won't bother them. So, somebody or two in the group needs to run an amp in self defense.

While self defense can be a issue on 20 it is rarely a problem for me on 40. I spend over 90 % of SSB time on 40 and have used band for 45 years now. Needless to say it is my favorite HF band. Most of my contact are during daylight hours or before and after sunrise. Sometimes atmospheric conditions are poor on 40 but with a amp you can get through. Sure you can get by with a hundred watts or even five watts QRP at times but then the challenge can be more for ham trying to copy you than the guy using 5 watts. Bottom line is power can make it easier for someone to copy you and increase odds of reliable communication.
Logged

--------------------------------------
Ham since 1969....  Old School 20wpm REAL Extra Class..
W1BR
Member

Posts: 4196




Ignore
« Reply #36 on: August 18, 2014, 09:31:34 PM »

To answer the question, going from 100 to 500 watts probably gives the most bang for the buck.  In that power range you have several choices for both solid state and relatively inexpensive tube based amplifiers.  Going from 500 to 1500 watts output is where the real money is going to come into play with less payback. 600 to 800 watts and a good antenna does the job on my end.
Logged
KM4AH
Member

Posts: 963




Ignore
« Reply #37 on: August 18, 2014, 09:51:44 PM »

Five hundred watts doesn't make a lot of sense to me when you can buy SB220's, L4B's, LK500's, Clipperton L's etc for $500 to $700 . And, you should be able to fix about anything that is likely to go wrong with one.
Logged
W8JX
Member

Posts: 13268




Ignore
« Reply #38 on: August 19, 2014, 04:42:04 AM »

Five hundred watts doesn't make a lot of sense to me when you can buy SB220's, L4B's, LK500's, Clipperton L's etc for $500 to $700 . And, you should be able to fix about anything that is likely to go wrong with one.

I have the successor to the Clipperton L (The Clipperton QRO) and it has served me well for about 20 years now. I usually run about 800 to 900 watts though it will do more. That gives me a solid 9+ db. I acquired a sb200 a few years ago that I plan install a harbach soft key and replace HV supply too in it soon as I have them on hand. When I get mods done It will be main amp while I go thru and rebuild clipperton for first time.
Logged

--------------------------------------
Ham since 1969....  Old School 20wpm REAL Extra Class..
VR2AX
Member

Posts: 1016




Ignore
« Reply #39 on: August 20, 2014, 05:48:17 AM »

Has anyone compared in the field say the new Acom 600  or similar, like the THP 1.1/1.2 or HL-550 Fx, versus say the Acom 1500? The valve/tube amp is selling for USD1K more on HRO, weights a ton more, is nearly 3db more, but how does one evaluate this in the real world?
Logged
N1UK
Member

Posts: 2243




Ignore
« Reply #40 on: August 20, 2014, 10:20:47 AM »

The Acom 1000 is worth a look. 1kw ssb and 6m. The tuning is very easy with the tuning display function.

Mark N1UK
Logged
WA1RNE
Member

Posts: 1010




Ignore
« Reply #41 on: August 23, 2014, 06:37:14 AM »

Sure it is, for lots of reasons, but I find these to be the most important:

-High QRM/QSB conditions

-Less than optimum antennas on the RX or TX side of the QSO, including mobile/maritime mobile

- Usually a requirement for working DX in a pile-up

Since there are lots of used 500 watt class amps available for reasonable $$, money usually isn't a deciding factor.

...WA1RNE

Logged
K7MH
Member

Posts: 455




Ignore
« Reply #42 on: August 24, 2014, 07:59:36 AM »

My experience on 40 is that with a 102ft doublet inverted V and 100 watts, I can rarely get into Europe on CW when I can hear them in a contest.
With an AL-811 I used to have, at 500 watts I could most usually work them. I don't think I could have ever worked ANY DX on 80 without it.
DXCC on 40 was work. DXCC on 80 was a MAJOR effort and I had to take every opportunity to work anything new.

From my experience, the first 500 watts or so is a worthwhile improvement.
Logged
W8JX
Member

Posts: 13268




Ignore
« Reply #43 on: August 24, 2014, 12:32:11 PM »

My experience on 40 is that with a 102ft doublet inverted V and 100 watts, I can rarely get into Europe on CW when I can hear them in a contest.
With an AL-811 I used to have, at 500 watts I could most usually work them. I don't think I could have ever worked ANY DX on 80 without it.
DXCC on 40 was work. DXCC on 80 was a MAJOR effort and I had to take every opportunity to work anything new.

From my experience, the first 500 watts or so is a worthwhile improvement.

It helps a lot on 80:& 40. I run 50 watts barefoot ( it is the level I drive amp with) and when I go to 800 watts with amp I get a solid 2 S units. Going to legal limit from 800 is about 1/2 S unit at best.
Logged

--------------------------------------
Ham since 1969....  Old School 20wpm REAL Extra Class..
VE3TMT
Member

Posts: 992




Ignore
« Reply #44 on: August 27, 2014, 06:37:32 AM »

I recently picked up an almost mint FL2100-B. Looks like original tubes and will do 600W easily. Due to the age, I replaced all the HV components, caps, diodes, bleeders etc. Where I used to have a problem trying to break a pileup with 100W I don't anymore. I find I usually get through on the first or second call with the amp. Amp runs off a dedicated 20A 120V line.
Logged
Pages: Prev 1 2 [3] 4 5 Next   Go Up
  Print  
 
Jump to:  

Powered by MySQL Powered by PHP Powered by SMF 1.1.11 | SMF © 2006-2009, Simple Machines LLC Valid XHTML 1.0! Valid CSS!