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Author Topic: HF converter  (Read 21671 times)
W2EAF
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Posts: 53




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« on: August 05, 2014, 12:41:37 PM »

Any thoughts on an HF converter for my car radio? Just for listening.
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K0BG
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« Reply #1 on: August 05, 2014, 01:11:04 PM »

The biggest issue you have in converting your car radio is the reinsertion of the missing carrier in SSB. The frequency conversion is a piece of cake. Personally, I know of none.
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W2EAF
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« Reply #2 on: August 05, 2014, 02:18:12 PM »

I should have been clearer. I'm interested in SWLing of AM sw stations, so carrier reinsertion is not an issue.
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K0BG
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« Reply #3 on: August 05, 2014, 05:23:43 PM »

You may have to do some searching, but sooner or later you'll find a few Gonset or Ameco (sp) inverters. Some, not all, are usable on 12 volt systems. They use nuvisters, but that shouldn't be a problem, as NOS parts are still available.

Look here: http://forums.qrz.com/showthread.php?353769-Unusual-Gonset-receiving-converter
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AA4PB
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« Reply #4 on: August 05, 2014, 06:20:19 PM »

I think that you'd get better performance for less money by purchasing a separate SW receiver that would run off 12VDC. With a converter you will have to have physical access to it to tune in stations anyway. Today's car radio isn't very sensitive on AM and they don't have a noise blanker. A complete solid state receiver can easily fit in the size of the old tube type converters.
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Bob  AA4PB
Garrisonville, VA
W4XK
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« Reply #5 on: August 05, 2014, 08:09:46 PM »

About 1954 or so I had a Gonset SW converter similar to the one in K0BG's post. However, it required 6 volts for the
filaments and 100 vdc or so for B+. Later I had a Morrow 5BR-2 ham band converter that also required the same voltage.
One might show up on ePay someday, but power will surely be a problem. Good Luck!

Bill W4XK
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WB6BYU
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« Reply #6 on: August 05, 2014, 08:53:20 PM »

I found one at a hamfest a couple years back - transistorized and ran off a single D cell.
It was a self-oscillating mixer circuit, basically a crystal oscillator and mixer, that chose
one of 2 crystals with high/low side conversion to cover 4 SW BC bands... or something
like that.  Don't remember the brand, but probably dated from the 1960's.
I gave it to a friend who is using it with a table radio.


It would be simple to build using, say, an SA602 oscillator/mixer chip, the hard part
being the input circuits for each band and matching to the car radio antenna.  (An
"active whip" approach might work through the coax.)  You also need a bypass
switch to revert to normal operation, and the extra length of cable might require a
readjustment of the antenna tuning on the radio.

A single crystal covers 2 bands about 2 MHz apart:  for example, a 6 MHz crystal would
cover 4.5 - 5.5 MHz on the low side and 6.5 - 7.5 MHz on the high side, using the AM
radio to tune through the band (backwards for the low side injection.)  Using cheap
microprocessor crystals you should be able to cover whatever bands are of most interest
with suitable front-end tuned circuits.
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K5LXP
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« Reply #7 on: August 06, 2014, 06:52:16 AM »

You can still buy converters:

http://www.mfjenterprises.com/Product.php?productid=MFJ-306


Mark K5LXP
Albuquerque, NM
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N0SYA
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« Reply #8 on: August 06, 2014, 07:29:30 AM »

Or;
http://www.ebay.com/itm/Pioneer-DEH-X2650UI-Shortwave-Car-Auto-Radio-FM-AM-SW-CD-RDS-USB-IPod-Sony-/251382893874
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If you have a clumsy child, you make them wear a helmet. If you have death prone children, you keep a few clones of them in your lab.
W2EAF
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« Reply #9 on: August 07, 2014, 05:28:09 PM »

Thanks to everyone for their input! I was thinking of building one or buying a vintage unit as was suggested. I had no idea that Pioneer made a care radio with SW tuning capability. That would be an ideal solution, except that I just installed a nice Alpine unit with hands-free Bluetooth calling and wouldn't want to give that up. So that leaves the MFJ unit, which seems like the best compromise.

Rob
W2EAF
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N0SYA
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« Reply #10 on: August 08, 2014, 10:05:14 AM »

A lot of Euro car makers have had sw in their radios, so not just Pioneers are out there.
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If you have a clumsy child, you make them wear a helmet. If you have death prone children, you keep a few clones of them in your lab.
M6GOM
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Posts: 1050




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« Reply #11 on: August 11, 2014, 02:40:40 AM »

A lot of Euro car makers have had sw in their radios, so not just Pioneers are out there.

They still do. My 2010 Ford Mondeo car stereo does SW and I know the same unit is in the current 2014 models.
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