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Author Topic: Question about mike sale  (Read 27411 times)
N9LCD
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Posts: 113




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« Reply #15 on: August 20, 2014, 06:19:45 AM »

K1CJS:

I was in banking for over twenty years.  None of our checks have our address printed on them. 

There is no known legal or regulatory requirement that the maker's (or account holder's) address be printed on checks.  It's just been done so long (as a convenience) that it's become a routine.

Also, for personal checks, there's no requirement that the account holder's name as printed on the check match the signature on the check.

The lack of an address on the check prevents a raid on your mail box should your checkbook be lost.  And the difference between the printed name on the check and the required signature is another security factor:  anybody who steals or finds a checkbook and doesn't know the required signature will sign the check the way the name is printed on it. 

N9LCD   
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KB3VWG
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Posts: 141




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« Reply #16 on: August 20, 2014, 01:55:01 PM »

Bruce:

Give Sun  Trust a call and let them know what's up.  They'll appreciate the alert.

N9LCD

I agree.

While I noted that the check may be fraudulent, it may also be drafted from funds taken out of a "legitimate" account. The person named on the check could be a long-term scam victim, an identity theft victim or a middle-man working under the con/ruse of "employment").

Informing the bank is always good; and they can handle it accordingly. Who knows, you may be holding $850 of someone else's money.

K1CJS:

I was in banking for over twenty years.  None of our checks have our address printed on them. 

There is no known legal or regulatory requirement that the maker's (or account holder's) address be printed on checks.  It's just been done so long (as a convenience) that it's become a routine.

Also, for personal checks, there's no requirement that the account holder's name as printed on the check match the signature on the check.

The lack of an address on the check prevents a raid on your mail box should your checkbook be lost.  And the difference between the printed name on the check and the required signature is another security factor:  anybody who steals or finds a checkbook and doesn't know the required signature will sign the check the way the name is printed on it. 

N9LCD   

You know...there used to be a tax "grievance" website (pre Modern Tea-Party - I wouldn't call it a "protest" site, because they weren't advocating non payment of taxes)...they gave instructions on how to make odd and irregular sized drafts, usually handwritten, that made it extremely inconvenient for the gov't to process your tax check. It listed all the technical requirements and specifications of a check...there weren't many (account holder name, to the order of, check number, routing number, I believe the amount in writing...and that's about it).


-KB3VWG
« Last Edit: August 20, 2014, 02:06:12 PM by KB3VWG » Logged
K1CJS
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Posts: 6283




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« Reply #17 on: August 20, 2014, 02:24:23 PM »

K1CJS:

I was in banking for over twenty years.  None of our checks have our address printed on them.  

There is no known legal or regulatory requirement that the maker's (or account holder's) address be printed on checks.  It's just been done so long (as a convenience) that it's become a routine....

Well, just about every bank I've been to in my area to inquire about an account won't process personal check orders without an address to be printed on the checks.  Further, most places of business won't take a personal check if the person's address isn't printed on it.  I'm told that that is to avoid fraud and help avoid the passing of bad checks.

I admit I don't know all the regs, and there are some check print businesses that will process orders for checks with only a name on them, but as there aren't many places that will take checks--name only, and just about none that will not take checks if the signatory isn't the person whose name in actually on the check.  

Business checks are another matter entirely, as is using a check to pay down an account.  But some of the same "rules" still apply for purchases, and that's at just about any sort of business in my area.
« Last Edit: August 20, 2014, 02:28:11 PM by K1CJS » Logged
N9LCD
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Posts: 113




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« Reply #18 on: August 20, 2014, 05:12:57 PM »

You're right about what has to be on a piece of paper to make it a check.

I once worked with a guy who I claimed shorted him on a "split the check" lunch.  To shut him up, I gave him a check for $3.00 -- written on a piece of toilet paper.  I paid him.  But he never cashed the toilet paper check.  Since it couldn't be machine-processed, he'd have to pay a collection fee -- about $20.00 back then.

On the other end, there was a "gas" welder who got a $25,000 check as firsr prize in a welding contest.  The check was was "burnt" into a 1/4 inch steel plate with a welding torch.  The welder "endorsed" it with his torch and the bank guards literally cancelled the check paid with tommy guns.

 Tongue

N9LCD     
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K6RQR
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Posts: 458




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« Reply #19 on: August 22, 2014, 08:38:27 AM »

Hello -
 I called Sun Trust this morning. I gave them the center number on the check and they determined that it had been drawn from the Atlanta office (even though the check envelope had a Denver postmark on it) and then I gave them the exact amount and the check number and the likely fictitious name on the check. The person on the phone told me that they knew of this kind of scam and that they would void the check altogether. He told me to just go ahead and destroy the check, which I did.
 Thanks for the good advice as I am now certain that there is no way I can be held accountable at a later date and I hope this thread is useful to others out there who might be the victims of this type of scam. It would seem that the number of scams is growing and we must be careful as many of these transactions involve substantial amounts of money.

73,
Bruce  K6RQR
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KB3VWG
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Posts: 141




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« Reply #20 on: August 24, 2014, 07:37:10 AM »

and they determined that it had been drawn from the Atlanta office (even though the check envelope had a Denver postmark on it)

Atlanta is a LARGE hub for financial scam activity. Nearly every scam has either a: fraudulent check, telephone number, postmark, story, IP address or victim that begins or ends in Georgia.

Why?

This form of scams derived from the Nigerian...and Atlanta has a large Nigerian population.
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N3AEG
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Posts: 56




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« Reply #21 on: August 25, 2014, 04:37:20 AM »

Hello All -
 I am seeking advice about a possible sale of a microphone. I received an email from a man who said that he wanted to buy my mike and that he would send along a cashier's check for the total of $45. I have waited several days and no check and then today I get an email saying that he has been traveling and that his secretary made a small mistake and sent me a check for $850! He wants me to deposit the check in my bank and wait for it to clear and then send him back the mike and the amount he overpaid. Smells like a scam to me and I am wondering if any of you have had a similar experience and, also, what is this possible scammer's method ? How does he get his money back for the  mike as well as the outrageous over payment that is being requested of me.

I got this scam when I tried selling something on Craigslist.  When he asked for my address, I gave them the FBI's field office in Baltimore's address and the name of the special agent charge.  I'm sure the FBI must wonder about the check that shows up out of the blue.

The other famous scam is they'll send a fake e-mail supposedly from PayPal that they've received the payment from the sell, but it's being held in escrow until the item ships and then the funds will be released.  The key is the e-mail address for "PayPal" is a free e-mail service which PayPal wouldn't use, nor do they have the escrow type service.
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