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Author Topic: Cabinet Stereo  (Read 16828 times)
G3RZP
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Posts: 1313




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« Reply #15 on: June 03, 2015, 10:52:41 PM »

The one Garrard factory left in Swindon is now a builder's merchants. The others got demolished and housing estates built on the sites many years ago.
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KC4MOP
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Posts: 960




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« Reply #16 on: June 04, 2015, 07:06:48 AM »

Would the changer in the Magnavox picture be more like a consumer version from Garrard??
I always remembered Garrards looking like there was a little more beauty to them compared to the one in picture.

What did the usual consumer know about this new thing called a "Stereo" back in the 60's?? NOTHING!! It was something everyone wanted to have. Some were "plain Jane" and some were beautiful pieces of furniture with minimal electronics and speakers inside. Nothing like we have access to today, thanks to advancements in technology.
The record changer was typically called a "Record Wrecker" because of the higher tracking force needed to trip the mechanism.
Garrard had a lot better approach for tripping and was a lot gentler to vinyl records. And they were designed for a magnetic phono cartridge and lighter tracking force.

Fred
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KD0REQ
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« Reply #17 on: June 04, 2015, 08:58:07 AM »

that turntable was sold in the US back in the late 50s and 60s as the Collaro.  cartridge was probably a Tetrad ceramic.  repair of those old beasts consists of cleaning and lubricating, then put a new needle in.  if it doesn't work, then the whole cartridge.  when the Needle Doctor was still in Dinkytown, I paid a few visits, awesome place.  recently ordered a new belt for my LP12 from them.
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KM1H
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« Reply #18 on: June 04, 2015, 02:01:49 PM »

Quote
The others got demolished and housing estates built on the sites many years ago.

Fancy name for what we refer to as "projects" over here.

Residents on both sides of the pond keep the cops well occupied.
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KB1WSY
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« Reply #19 on: June 04, 2015, 03:32:57 PM »

Quote
The others got demolished and housing estates built on the sites many years ago.

Fancy name for what we refer to as "projects" over here.


G3RZP will correct me if I'm wrong. As I recall it, in the UK "housing estate" is a relatively neutral term similar to the American term, "housing development." It could be almost any type of home, destined for any socioeconomic class. Actually maybe I'm completely wrong about this ... I'm British but haven't lived in the UK for decades.

In the early 1970s my turntable was a Garrard AP76, supposedly a step up from the SP25 series. After buying it (and already being familiar with the SP25 because we had loads of them at school) I wasn't so sure about the supposed superiority of the AP76. The esthetics were "bling" and the platter had a noticeable up-and-down oscillation as it rotated. The AP76 pickup (US = "tone arm") did have "bias compensation" -- an adjustable counterweight for centrifugal force. Garrard put the prestigious label "transcription" on this product. From what I recall I paid about 30 pounds sterling for it, while the SP25 retailed for probably 20 pounds. I used a Goldring magnetic cartridge, although later replaced it with a Shure which sounded better to my ears -- the Goldring was a bit "dull" but perhaps it was more accurate!

My dad had a Quad II amp/preamp/tuner, with a Garrard 301 (which truly *was* a "transcription"-quality product) and a Lowther PM6 speaker (all monophonic). He literally threw them away sometime in the 1990s, not realizing that by then these items were already worth a mint in the vintage market! He also threw away my vintage Heathkit HR-10B that I built myself in about 1970, and various smaller Heathkit items (a VOM, a code oscillator, etc.), with my permission. At that point I had no interest in ham radio. More fool me.

73 de Martin, KB1WSY
« Last Edit: June 04, 2015, 03:47:13 PM by KB1WSY » Logged
G3RZP
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Posts: 1313




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« Reply #20 on: June 04, 2015, 11:00:10 PM »

Quote
As I recall it, in the UK "housing estate" is a relatively neutral term similar to the American term, "housing development." It could be almost any type of home, destined for any socioeconomic class.

Pretty much. It can also be a polite term for 'developer's goldmine'!
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