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Author Topic: What makes "old" or "vintage" expensive?  (Read 99392 times)
AC5UP
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Posts: 4546




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« Reply #105 on: March 14, 2015, 10:20:05 AM »

It's now official..........  The toob audio thing has gotten completely out of hand.       (click the pic for an example)



What we have here is a vintage stereo phono amplifier in the five watts per channel class.  Next to the phono jacks to the left is a 6EU7 dual triode 1st audio pre-amplifier.  The next two tubes are 6BQ5's, the fourth tube to the right is a 6CA4 rectifier.  I predict the final bid will approach, if not exceed, a Franklin..........  And that's before the s & h charges.  If it makes any difference, a web search tells me this is something of a cult item:  http://www.diyaudio.com/forums/tubes-valves/209514-magnavox-8608-10-a-3.html

Which is totally bat-squeeze nutso, considering it came from a low-pedigree console phono, and this particular offering does not include the control panel that plugged into the Molex type connector seen top / front.......    Roll Eyes
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KB1WSY
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« Reply #106 on: March 14, 2015, 10:30:07 AM »

That locomotive was French, which is why it wouldn't go through the concourse floor at Washington Union Station - it would never have been anywhere near the US, let alone Washington! That accident happened at a Paris station, and I can't remember which one, but I think it was on the line from the south west.

There was this famous one at Montparnasse station in 1895:



Details here: http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Montparnasse_derailment.

The old Montparnasse station was demolished in the 1960s and rebuilt as an undistinguished new building a few hundred meters away. It is indeed the main station for travel to southwest France.

73 de Martin, KB1WSY
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K8GY
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« Reply #107 on: March 17, 2015, 05:01:42 PM »

Buy Kenwood TS 590, best bang for the buck....
Got one and I love it.
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KM1H
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« Reply #108 on: March 22, 2015, 05:58:49 PM »

Its the 590G now; is it a worthwhile upgrade?

Carl
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AC5UP
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Posts: 4546




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« Reply #109 on: March 25, 2015, 07:09:07 PM »


This is what happens when marijuana becomes legal:    http://www.shopgoodwill.com/viewItem.asp?ItemID=20556596

 Wink
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W1BR
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Posts: 4188




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« Reply #110 on: March 25, 2015, 08:40:47 PM »

Yes, but it is a catalin, and so long as there are no stress cracks they do go for outrageous amounts of money. When that cabinet is cleaned up, and the original colors show, it will be eye candy.  The problem with catalin is that outgasses from the day it was cast... eventually all of those radio cases will crack or turn to dust.  Not my cup of tea... but I do own a few fancy tombstones and cathedrals that are good for sticker shock. Price a Zenith "Walton."

Pete
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AC5UP
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« Reply #111 on: May 13, 2015, 05:49:36 PM »




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KD0REQ
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« Reply #112 on: May 13, 2015, 06:31:38 PM »

well no wonder, it has matching tube shields.  wonder if those are Telefunken ECC83s... with matched date codes...
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W1BR
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« Reply #113 on: May 13, 2015, 06:33:23 PM »


This is what happens when marijuana becomes legal:    http://www.shopgoodwill.com/viewItem.asp?ItemID=20556596

 Wink

Its catalin.  Rich folks collect them because they are pretty. Some sell for 13 grand or more... I could never see a reason to collect a radio with a case made from material that is continuously outgassing, shrinking, warping, etc.  
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AC5UP
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« Reply #114 on: May 13, 2015, 08:16:32 PM »

wonder if those are Telefunken ECC83s... with matched date codes...

For that kind of money it should come with matched Telefunken's and a Funk & Wagnalls with the entry for  " moron "  highlighted.............

Two things about that auction took my breath away:

1)  The Marantz is a donated item.  Like, somebody got tired of dusting it and....
2)   For the same money a totally bitchin' surround sound setup can be had brand new (with warranty instead of only a six tube preamp that needs to be re-capped) plus a buttload of Netflix or porn or Netflix porn or every episode of The X Files... Etc.
3)   Here's a Marantz Model 7 in the nude:



Sure, if the build quality was any higher the serial number plate would feature the word " Tektronix ", but rumor has it Black Beauty / Bumblebee condensers do not age gracefully even if yer' Telerfunkins er matched.    Wink
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VE3LYX
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« Reply #115 on: May 14, 2015, 03:49:29 AM »

An older AM rig can be had for a $100 or so. I have a DX60B/HR10B for sale currently. You can build a CW rig in a day for next to nothing. Then you are really into HAM radio. Old military sets work well too. I use a pair of ARC5s  on 160m and 80M that cost me less then $20 each plus shipping. My daily rig is a No 19 Wireless NOS I paid $50 for a few months ago. I had to build a PS but the junk box and $20 got me that done. When I want to "Donald Duck" I do have my original KNWD TS830S. However the homebrew one tubers and the old Military stuff is far more fun. I am a Ham , not a CB er and feel guilty running a store bought radio. "Look what I built" is to me much more interesting than "look what I bought." In fact it has rekindled my interest in the Hobby.
Don
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AH7I
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Posts: 125


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« Reply #116 on: May 15, 2015, 12:25:31 PM »

It's only expensive if you want what everyone else wants.
For the penny pinching contrarian, it's a feast that's difficult to turn away from.
73, bob ah7i/w4
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N8FVJ
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« Reply #117 on: May 27, 2015, 04:35:50 AM »

Others well covered the cost issues using inflation calculators. It is simply a matter of supply & demand.

As for an upgrade, used is the best bargain as long as the radio is fully functional and of quality design. Older SS used transceivers can have surprising performance compared to new products. For HF $250 buys a clean ICOM IC-730. Missing features such as general receive and 160 meters, the IC-730 is very reliable and has a good performing receiver (see eham reviews). Another performance bargain in the same price range is the Ten Tec OMNI D and Corsair series. And, I believe Ten Tec still services these radios.
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N2EY
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« Reply #118 on: May 27, 2015, 08:14:28 AM »

>there is a certain charm to the GG1...<

Especially when they can't stop, over-run and end up dropping through the concourse into the basement baggage rooms at Washington Union station.....

As one did on the Federal Express in 1953......

Which was NOT due to the locomotive in any way.

What actually happened was this:

The PRR Federal Express did indeed crash through the bumper and into the concourse, which then collapsed and put the locomotive and a car or two into the basement. No one was killed, and most folks didn't even need medical attention.

What happened was that the angle cock - a valve that isolates the air brake line - on one of the cars got moved to the closed position. This was determined to have happened due to the design of the handle, which was consequently changed. The closed valve meant that the brakes on only the locomotive and a few cars at the front of the train worked - the rest of the long train's brakes did nothing.

The GG-1 pulling the Federal Express that day was 4876, which was removed and rebuilt, and ran for many more years without incident.

If a steamer had been pulling the Federal Express that day, the results would have been much worse.

73 de Jim, N2EY
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G3RZP
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Posts: 1265




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« Reply #119 on: May 27, 2015, 08:46:43 AM »

The report I've seen said that the brake cocks were found isolated after the third car when they were 27 miles out of Providence, causing the train to come to a stop. Then they opened the cocks and all was well until apparently the same cock at the rear of the third car managed to close again, leaving 13 cars with the brake lines pressurised, no matter what the driver did.......What we would call a 'brown trousers moment'.

That is where the disadvantage of single pipe Westinghouse brakes appears - with the two pipe system, two cocks would have had to shut. With vacuum brakes, it can't happen but you only get 11lbs/square inch as opposed to 80 or 100 with air brakes.

 
Quote
No one was killed, and most folks didn't even need medical attention.

87 were injured, one of whom was the fireman: it would have been more if Clerk R. A. Klopp hadn't been given a telephone warning by John W. Feeney in K tower, and he got people out of the stationmaster and telegraph offices. Fortunately, there was nobody in the baggage room.....

72 hours later, they had covered up a lot of the damage so they could run the traffic for the inauguration of Dwight D. Eisenhower as president 5 days later...

They recovered 4876 by January 28: some wag suggested it took that long because no one could find the baggage check for the loco!
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