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Author Topic: What makes "old" or "vintage" expensive?  (Read 99869 times)
N2EY
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Posts: 5094




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« Reply #30 on: October 15, 2014, 06:17:13 AM »

I'll agree on ex mil gear. But things like 75A receivers, SX101, SX88 - all those ham rigs. Surely so many of the families of deceased hams didn't just land fill them? They can't all be that dim as to realise that there MIGHT be some value......

Couple of things:

1) There really weren't all that many of those made. For example, there were reportedly fewer than 6000 75A-4s built, and they were probably the most popular model. There are now over 725,000 US hams alone - which means that if all of them stayed in the US, and none were ever scrapped, fewer than 1 in 100 US hams today could have one!

2) Some folks collect, collect, collect. One California ham I know of has a huge collection - all piled up in stacks all over his house and at borrowed spaces. Over 1000 radios - all just sitting, doing nothing, not for sale. And that's just one guy!

3) All too often, a ham passes away and his family has no idea what the stuff is worth, nor do they know other hams. So it gets junked, given away, etc. Or it gets stored improperly and becomes useless.

73 de Jim, N2EY
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AC5UP
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Posts: 4546




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« Reply #31 on: October 15, 2014, 06:05:04 PM »

Japan bought tons of tube gear for some odd reason...

There is absolutely no truth to the rumor the Japanese equivalent for a 6L6 is their 6R6................
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K5WLR
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Posts: 313




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« Reply #32 on: October 16, 2014, 05:38:57 AM »

Japan bought tons of tube gear for some odd reason...

There is absolutely no truth to the rumor the Japanese equivalent for a 6L6 is their 6R6................

G R O A N !  Embarrassed
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AC5UP
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Posts: 4546




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« Reply #33 on: October 16, 2014, 05:32:57 PM »


[  I'm so ashamed....  ]
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K8QV
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Posts: 79




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« Reply #34 on: October 17, 2014, 12:47:42 PM »

An aging population yearning for nostalgia and a dwindling supply of vintage gear equals high prices. They should be considered as collectibles or antiques rather than just old, used equipment. Somebody out there is willing to pay whatever it takes to recreate his 1965 Novice station or the Collins or Drake line he always wanted as a kid. If only I had room for them, I'd pay more than it's really worth for an old Viking Ranger, an HRO-500 and Drake 2-B. I miss them.
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G3RZP
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Posts: 1319




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« Reply #35 on: October 18, 2014, 02:16:09 AM »

It's in much the same way that a steam locomotive that cost £11,000 when built in 1948, and sold as scrap for £1,000 in 1964, fetches well over £1,000,000 today. Even a 'parts' loco needing £500,000 spending to make anything of it fetches about £350,000.

It is said that to spend a fortune, booze is the most pleasurable, women the most troublesome and gambling the most certain. Owning and running a steam locomotive tops all three!
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AC5UP
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« Reply #36 on: October 18, 2014, 12:34:20 PM »

A few weeks ago I bought an all-in-one scanner / inkjet / FAX printer combo that was on sale at half price.  This particular model has excellent reviews for the photo printing capability and I was not disappointed.  It makes absolutely perfect borderless prints and although the ink & paper is a bit pricey vs a B&W laser it's a no-brainer bargain compared to 35mm film.  Which brings me to the point of price perspective...

Back in the day the operating cost of a steam locomotive wasn't prohibitive as it was far more cost effective than anything with wheels in back and a horse up front.  The locomotive might burn coal like a house on fire but if it's pulling 100 boxcars the cost per car from Point A to Point B becomes 1% of the total.  Factor in speed and for passenger service back in the day steam powered trains had no competition.  Haul enough freight and the railroads could make good money, which they did, as there will always be a need to move goods and people from one place to another.  Diesel / electric locomotives offer reduced operating costs over steam but in the end it was the convenience of motor freight that did the railroads the most harm.  Semi trucks are nowhere near as fuel efficient as steel wheels on a rail but you don't need to lay track to get a truck where it needs to go.  As for passenger service, driving a car is easier for short haul and nothing is faster than air for long haul.

You spends your money and takes your pick.

All I know is that back in the day I used to shoot plenty of 35mm slides whenever I went traveling and didn't worry too much about the cost.  It cost what it cost and if I wanted pictures of a distant place I could either take them or assume I may never have another chance.  <click>   And I'm old enough to remember riding a train with a steam loco up front.  They do make an impression and have a presence all their own.

BTW:  Here's one image I'm glad someone took:



Pretty sure that's a Baldwin Big Boy and if you look closely at the cab I think I see someone with a blue shirt... For the sake of perspective that is one very, very large piece of machinery.  The Union Pacific commissioned Baldwin to build the Big Boy line to haul coal from Wyoming to the power plants of southern California.  The more cars you could haul per trip the lower the cost per unit so they designed 'large'.  Very, Very large............

Union Pacific made money doing it and country music wouldn't be the same without 'em!
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G3RZP
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Posts: 1319




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« Reply #37 on: October 18, 2014, 02:02:59 PM »

That is not a 'Big Boy'. The 'Big Boy' was the 4-8-8-4 built by ALCO for the Union Pacific to get freight over the Sherman incline. The UP are currently restoring one to running order in their Cheyenne, WY workshops.

Nice to see that some parts at least of corporate America have some regard for their history.....

The biggest steam locomotive ever built......

OK, so you have a Limey lecturing you on US steam locos.....Live with it!
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AC5UP
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Posts: 4546




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« Reply #38 on: October 18, 2014, 02:24:59 PM »

It was the grey nose on the boiler that faked me out... The lack of twin cylinders and twin drive wheels should have clued me in.



Wikipedia tells me the loco and tender combo weighed in at a megapound and a quarter.  Carried 25,000 gallons of water.  28 short tons of coal.  That's almost two days work for a miner, 'cuz you load 16 tons and whaddaya' get.....

See http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Union_Pacific_Big_Boy for more large numbers.
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G3RZP
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Posts: 1319




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« Reply #39 on: October 19, 2014, 01:53:03 PM »

You can understand why they needed mechanical stokers!

You could have a dinner party in that firebox, it's so big.....
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WA9CFK
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Posts: 214




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« Reply #40 on: October 22, 2014, 09:08:42 PM »

Vintage gear sells for what the market will bear. New gear sells for what the manufacturer can convince the buyer they need.

Nothing new here. Wink

I still use a 6 inch slide rule for gas mileage. It drops into the car door side pocket and works in below zero or sweltering hot weather and after setting for weeks on end. Two decimal places works fine.  Grin
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G3RZP
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Posts: 1319




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« Reply #41 on: October 23, 2014, 01:10:40 AM »

Doesn't need batteries, either.

I am told that slide rules are fetching good prices on ebay.....
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GW3OQK
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Posts: 449




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« Reply #42 on: October 23, 2014, 01:19:52 AM »

5UP I'm a bluegrass singer musician. A soon as I saw the picture of that big 8-wheeler I thought Hank Snow, I'm Moving On. http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=StvgvCoXrYA I'll be doing it at practice tonite and get the others in the mood with your fine photo. Wish I had a voice like Hank
73
Andrew
GW3OQK
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KG8LB
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Posts: 408




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« Reply #43 on: October 23, 2014, 05:29:31 AM »

 That big eight wheeler rollin down the track .......You've been flying too high for my little old sky son I'm movin on ..


   Sure , the old gear fad will fade , just as ham radio fades .
In my case , I'm only here for the old gear . Absolutely zero interest in the radio appliances people use today . For all the reasons they give for SDR etc .. I have a cell phone that works even better than the latest stuff .
It is the old radios here or I'm movin on .   Wink
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WA9CFK
Member

Posts: 214




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« Reply #44 on: October 24, 2014, 02:32:44 PM »

My one complaint about boat anchors is the lack of 10 and 18 MHz. Also many units lack the 160 m band; the rest of the wiz-bang stuff is nice and at time handy but you can CQ without.

Admittedly, since modern technology makes it cheap there is no reason not to include it in a new rig.
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