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Author Topic: What makes "old" or "vintage" expensive?  (Read 99891 times)
AC2EU
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« Reply #60 on: November 12, 2014, 07:24:17 PM »



I can remember when things like this could be had for $5.00 or less at almost any swapmeet...  And the seller was happy to see 'em go.
Nice condition aside from the missing knob.  High bidder will be disappointed when they discover a guitar pickup doesn't have quite enough Moxie to drive this amp to full power. 

But the sound will be toobular...   [click the pic to see what it sold for]  Tongue
well, you dared me to click and I did! WOW!! The only question is WHY? It's a low-fi PA amp for God's sake!
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AC5UP
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« Reply #61 on: November 13, 2014, 02:03:33 AM »

In case you're up for another adventure in lunacy, click this...   http://www.shopgoodwill.com/viewitem-sugg.asp?itemid=18734836
then this:    http://myfenderchamp.com/2010/03/29/fender-champ-5f1-wiring-diagram/

You could buy a nice late model used HF rig for the same or less money as this single ended 6V6 five watt guitar amp.
( which back in the day was most likely considered a beginner or practice amp )

Search " Fender " on the same site and you'll see newer transistorized amps going for much, much less.

Apparently the 6V6 has powers beyond the plate voltage that few of us are aware of.........   Wink
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AC2EU
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« Reply #62 on: November 13, 2014, 06:12:17 AM »

It's the "magic" of "pre-CBS Fender". There is a whole pre-CBS cult of musicians that will pay a month's wages for these old
Fenders. They believe that these are superior units blessed by the high priest Leo Fender himself.
The truth is that there is very little difference electrically, just cosmetics.

This proves the theorem that an article is worth what you can get someone to pay for it!

Another interesting item is the Goodwill company itself. It's NOT A CHARITY! The name implies that it is, so people donate items to them and they profit from it. An interesting and deceptive business plan to say the least.
Here is their mission statement:
http://www.goodwill.org/about-us/
The closest thing to charitable work that they do is hiring people that the government grants will pay you to hire, such as ex-felons, ex-drug addicts, chronic welfare recipients, etc.
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AC5UP
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« Reply #63 on: November 13, 2014, 08:27:41 PM »

Another interesting item is the Goodwill company itself. It's NOT A CHARITY! The name implies that it is, so people donate items to them and they profit from it. An interesting and deceptive business plan to say the least.

You're saying the name Goodwill Industries implies a charity operation?  Interesting interpretation....

If you have a problem with the company, feel free to shop elsewhere.  Especially if you can find a retail operation that does not sell above their cost and pays their employees more than the income they generate.   I can't vouch for every Goodwill operation but from what I've seen of my local group they do provide training and job experience as advertised.  The mission statement you linked to also mentions 83% of revenue is spent directly on programs.  Do you know what percentage the typical charity spends on their stated goals? 

Here's one resource site:  http://charity.lovetoknow.com/What_Percentage_of_Donations_Go_to_Charity
And another:  http://www.charitynavigator.org/

Who knew the George Bush Presidential Library Foundation spends 40.6% of donations on the library and 45.3% on administration expenses?  http://www.charitynavigator.org/index.cfm?bay=search.summary&orgid=10692#.VGV-lIVtMWM
Just for grins, compare that to the numbers for The Richard Nixon Foundation:   http://www.charitynavigator.org/index.cfm?bay=search.summary&orgid=6222#.VGWAE4VtMWM
Or your nearest Goodwill organization:  http://www.charitynavigator.org/index.cfm?keyword_list=goodwill&Submit2=Search&bay=search.results

The closest thing to charitable work that they do is hiring people that the government grants will pay you to hire, such as ex-felons, ex-drug addicts, chronic welfare recipients, etc.

Please tell me how you believe we should deal with  " ex-felons, ex-drug addicts, chronic welfare recipients, etc. "...............
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AC2EU
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« Reply #64 on: November 13, 2014, 09:06:08 PM »

Another interesting item is the Goodwill company itself. It's NOT A CHARITY! The name implies that it is, so people donate items to them and they profit from it. An interesting and deceptive business plan to say the least.

You're saying the name Goodwill Industries implies a charity operation?  Interesting interpretation....

If you have a problem with the company, feel free to shop elsewhere.  Especially if you can find a retail operation that does not sell above their cost and pays their employees more than the income they generate.   I can't vouch for every Goodwill operation but from what I've seen of my local group they do provide training and job experience as advertised.  The mission statement you linked to also mentions 83% of revenue is spent directly on programs.  Do you know what percentage the typical charity spends on their stated goals? 

Here's one resource site:  http://charity.lovetoknow.com/What_Percentage_of_Donations_Go_to_Charity
And another:  http://www.charitynavigator.org/

Who knew the George Bush Presidential Library Foundation spends 40.6% of donations on the library and 45.3% on administration expenses?  http://www.charitynavigator.org/index.cfm?bay=search.summary&orgid=10692#.VGV-lIVtMWM
Just for grins, compare that to the numbers for The Richard Nixon Foundation:   http://www.charitynavigator.org/index.cfm?bay=search.summary&orgid=6222#.VGWAE4VtMWM
Or your nearest Goodwill organization:  http://www.charitynavigator.org/index.cfm?keyword_list=goodwill&Submit2=Search&bay=search.results

The closest thing to charitable work that they do is hiring people that the government grants will pay you to hire, such as ex-felons, ex-drug addicts, chronic welfare recipients, etc.

Please tell me how you believe we should deal with  " ex-felons, ex-drug addicts, chronic welfare recipients, etc. "...............


They might as well take the govt's money if it's being offered to employ those folks, but that is that is what the GRANT mentioned in the statement is about. It beats leaving those who wish to work unemployed. However,any company get get such a grant.
Many people around here think they are DONATING TO A CHARITY.
Really, the way the mission statement is written makes them sound like the Salivation Army, which they are not.
I think it's a bit deceptive, but that's my opinion.

I do go to the local store once in a while, but their prices are bit high for donated used merchandise.

As you say, many bonafide charities are wasteful with the funds they collect being lost to "administrative costs". The Red Cross is one of the most egregious.
I guess that was my main point. Make sure you know who you re giving your money or your stuff to.

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AH7I
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« Reply #65 on: November 17, 2014, 04:43:54 PM »

The only expensive old stuff is the old stuff everyone wants.  I have a nice Yaesu FT101B that won't fetch $250. It's got AC and DC supplies built in. It has a crystal filter for CW. It has a noise blanker and an RF speech processor. Even the exotic stuff. If it's so exotic that they only built one, I don't care how interesting or what historical significance, no one wants it because there is no circle of collectors to share their pleasure with. You want a huge discount over now on a used transceiver? I'll bought a beautiful Collins 618S and can't see the time to work on it. I'm thinking $250? You'll need to cobble a power supply. It's begging for an Arduino based controller and reeks of steam punk with the covers off and all the tuning racks moving up and down as you change frequency. 100W plate modulated AM. Hmmm I'm talking myself into keeping it :-). If you dig into recent history... The big Collins stuff is dropping in price as the collectors demise. The same thing happened years ago with bottle collectors. There used to be $10,000 bottles. That's when there were only two of them and 30 guys wanting. With two guys and two bottles. What's one worth?
73,
-Bob
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N3UIQ
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« Reply #66 on: December 16, 2014, 01:33:14 PM »

I am very grateful to be able to buy a complete HF station with SSB transceiver, power supply, l200W PEP amp and 2000W tuner for $225 from a local hamfest. Everything works after a small amount of T/S on the amp and will be on the air soon, it's all 30 to 45 years old so I guess that still seems too expensive to some. Boatanchors are not a fad, they have been selling since new and will continue to sell because they work and are fixable by any competent user, this is a facet of their popularity that most hams ignore. I feel that a lot of hams just hate the old stuff being around, don't worry they will stop selling when the FCC mandates it and digital takes over.
73
Bob
N3UIQ
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G3RZP
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« Reply #67 on: December 17, 2014, 12:29:01 AM »

>will continue to sell because they work and are fixable by any competent user<

While I agree, I'm not sure that there are so many competent users around these days. Even many professional technicians are getting to the stage that all they know is surface mount and digital: the intricacies of say an AGC controlled analogue IF strip full of through hole discrete components is just outside their range of experience.
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KD0REQ
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« Reply #68 on: December 17, 2014, 09:23:23 AM »

then they need to broaden their experience.  I run across wacko crap all the time... rebuilt a Hammond organ for a neighbor, had to learn all about that thing.  have had to rebuild the front ends of both cars, learned it when mine blew the bottom ball joint crossing the highway, and tore open a series of connectors that among other things controlled taillights, fuel pump motor, and seat belt interconnects.  had to learn framing, door hanging, plumbing, lots of things when we gutted and rebuilt from the blocks our basement.

smart people can learn anything.

drones just say, "uhhhh, ain't my job, not current, no manuals..." whatever.  a competent tech can read a schematic, think a moment about voltage/current/gain relationships in the stage, and find trouble.  doesn't matter if it's hydraulics masquerading as globe tubes or the truth table on a chip.
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N3UIQ
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« Reply #69 on: December 20, 2014, 01:12:42 PM »

Ahhh.. but I am somewhat grateful that many drones exist, a co-worker drone of mine gave me his old pickup because he didn't want to spend $2000 to get the dealer to fix it, I fixed it myself for about $600 and it is one very clean old Chevy pickup, another drone sold me his Sears garden tractor for almost nothing because he didn't want to spend the money to get the shop to fix a bad miss in the engine, a couple of needle valve adjustments and it was a smooth running machine, been mowing with it for 14 years now. We need drones my friend, only problem is that's most of the people I know and if I do need help or advice from anyone it ain't there, but I have the internet for that!
73
Bob
N3UIQ
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G3RZP
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« Reply #70 on: December 21, 2014, 12:28:15 AM »

To what extent is analog taught now in electronics courses? I know that in a number of  educational establishments over here, the cost of a proper lab is frowned on when you can teach digital electronics on computers....
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AC5UP
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« Reply #71 on: January 01, 2015, 09:22:42 AM »

On a vaguely related note, click the link below for an example of what some older children are willing to pay for their toys...

http://www.shopgoodwill.com/viewItem.asp?ItemID=19336956

I have no issue with the concept of model railroading, but at that price ??    WOW !!
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G3RZP
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« Reply #72 on: January 01, 2015, 12:07:28 PM »

In railroad terms, that could be considered cheap when compared with a 4 foot 8-1/2 inch gauge steam loco, for which you can figure on $800k or $900k just for an overhaul!
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WA1RNE
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« Reply #73 on: January 06, 2015, 09:17:20 AM »

Simple....supply and demand.
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KC2QYM
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« Reply #74 on: January 13, 2015, 06:43:46 AM »

There is a great argument in getting into and staying in the hobby on the cheap but that doesn't have to include classless behaviour.  For instance you can buy rigs that need repairs cheaply as long as you or a friend know how to get it back up to spec.  I see a number of classifieds on eham where the ham honestly tells you what's wrong with the radio but then wants some ridiculous price for it.  I had a IC-718 that needed an entire board replacement ($275); rather than put additional money into the radio I posted it on Eham for $125 and explained to the buyer exactly what the problem was.  He bought it from me at my asking price; bought the board from Icom parts and for $400 and change he had a fully working rig.  I cut my loss and he gained a cheap 718.  That's the way economics works.  The other low class way to gain cheap equipment is to 'Cheat the SK's widow'.  I know hams like that and I shun them as lowly bottom feeders.  As a matter of fact one of my elmers turned out to be such a creature and I disassociated myself from him.  The other social problem hams have is coveting.  They want to have and own some rare, old piece of S--T and will do anything to find it and get it cheaply.  This actually creates a market for the old and obsolete equipment out there.  You know some of these hams; they're the hoarders that post pictures of themselves in wall to ceiling stacks of gear.  Other prowling, covetous hams keep track of these guys to see if they make it to the SK page in QST to plan out their widow approach.  So to the original poster of this thread I say...try to understand economics a little better and remember that a really cheap radio is only an SK widow away.
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