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Author Topic: Newest U.S. shortwave broadcaster kicks off this evening.  (Read 106128 times)
W9ALD
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Posts: 44




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« Reply #30 on: November 11, 2014, 01:42:51 AM »

I finally received them last night.  Signal level was not as strong as Radio Havana on 6MHz.  Strong modulation and nice sounding audio.
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The mere presence of a signal is more important than it's magnitude.
RENTON481
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Posts: 281




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« Reply #31 on: November 11, 2014, 11:27:58 AM »

The fact that this station is apparently so hard to hear in much of the U.S. makes me wonder if they're running on lower power than WRMI itself?
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K5TED
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Posts: 241




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« Reply #32 on: November 11, 2014, 06:34:37 PM »

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=upFHvw1mEA8
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K6RQR
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Posts: 458




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« Reply #33 on: November 12, 2014, 10:59:39 AM »

Good news but I have a question as I haven't heard the station yet. What does the manager mean when he refers to the "long overdue commercialization of SW radio?"

Bruce  K6RQR
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WW7KE
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Posts: 949




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« Reply #34 on: November 12, 2014, 02:32:11 PM »

Good news but I have a question as I haven't heard the station yet. What does the manager mean when he refers to the "long overdue commercialization of SW radio?"

Bruce  K6RQR

There have been commercial shortwave operations in the past -- WRUL/WNYW before the mid '70s, WRNO until (I think) Hurricane Katrina wrecked their transmitter, a station in Utah pre-KTBN, and more recently WRMI (which is more brokered than truly commercial).  There were some prior to WW2 as well, many of which became part of VOA during the war. 

But most American shortwave broadcasters have been religious, mostly in English but some in Spanish (KGEI comes to mind  -- I'm not sure if it's still around), especially in the last 30 years.

This is certainly the biggest attempt at strictly secular, commercial shortwave since WRNO.
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He speaks fluent PSK31, in FT8...  One QSO with him earns you 5BDXCC...  His Wouff Hong has two Wouffs... Hiram Percy Maxim called HIM "The Old Man..."  He is... The Most Interesting Ham In The World!
W4KYR
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Posts: 1803




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« Reply #35 on: November 13, 2014, 04:35:19 AM »

Good news but I have a question as I haven't heard the station yet. What does the manager mean when he refers to the "long overdue commercialization of SW radio?"

Bruce  K6RQR

There have been commercial shortwave operations in the past -- WRUL/WNYW before the mid '70s, WRNO until (I think) Hurricane Katrina wrecked their transmitter, a station in Utah pre-KTBN, and more recently WRMI (which is more brokered than truly commercial).  There were some prior to WW2 as well, many of which became part of VOA during the war. 

But most American shortwave broadcasters have been religious, mostly in English but some in Spanish (KGEI comes to mind  -- I'm not sure if it's still around), especially in the last 30 years.

This is certainly the biggest attempt at strictly secular, commercial shortwave since WRNO.

WRNO used to run the Rush Limbaugh program back in the 90's. WWCR would play country music from time to time if it wasn't running Christian programming.  WBCQ from Maine ran oldies at one time.
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W0BTU
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Posts: 2268


WWW

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« Reply #36 on: November 13, 2014, 06:32:46 AM »

In SW Missouri, I hear them whenever I tune there. They're 5 to 15 over S9 here this morning, on either the SW Beverage or an inverted-L hanging from a tree.
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NO2A
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Posts: 1400




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« Reply #37 on: November 15, 2014, 01:50:41 AM »

"The Okeechobee site is the largest privately-owned shortwave station in the Western Hemisphere, with 14 transmitters (most of them 100,000 watts) and 23 antennas beamed in 11 different directions around the globe.  We now have a studio and administrative offices in Okeechobee in the 16,000-square-foot transmitter building about 20 miles north of Lake Okeechobee.  The antennas and transmitters are located on a 660-acre site (that's one square mile of land) which is also used as a cattle ranch."

I wonder about the cost of insurance and upkeep on ONE SQUARE MILE of towers, elevated feedlines and Yagis in Hurricane Alley? For sure, Connector Zone commercials aren't paying the bills. Maybe it's all a front for massing anti-Castro cows.   





I feel sorry for all those cows getting a huge dose of rf. That`s a lot of power being radiated!
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WW7KE
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Posts: 949




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« Reply #38 on: November 15, 2014, 07:25:53 AM »

I feel sorry for all those cows getting a huge dose of rf. That`s a lot of power being radiated![/quote]

Pre-cooked burgers and steaks? Grin
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He speaks fluent PSK31, in FT8...  One QSO with him earns you 5BDXCC...  His Wouff Hong has two Wouffs... Hiram Percy Maxim called HIM "The Old Man..."  He is... The Most Interesting Ham In The World!
NO2A
Member

Posts: 1400




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« Reply #39 on: November 20, 2014, 09:59:03 AM »

I feel sorry for all those cows getting a huge dose of rf. That`s a lot of power being radiated!

Pre-cooked burgers and steaks? Grin
[/quote]Well if they go blind and sterile,we`ll know why. Strong signals into central NJ.
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KF5UFA
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Posts: 6




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« Reply #40 on: December 04, 2014, 06:59:20 PM »

They're booming here in deep South Texas.  SINPO 55445.  I'm enjoying the jazz music.
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W4QG
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Posts: 41




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« Reply #41 on: December 05, 2014, 06:30:34 AM »

Peaking about S9+50dB 175 miles north of them on a Steppir tuned to that frequency up at 75ft.
Fair audio. Nice jazz tune right now. Have not heard any commercials yet.
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VK2NZA
Member

Posts: 294




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« Reply #42 on: December 06, 2014, 09:13:43 AM »

As yet I have been unable to copy Global Radio here in Eastern Australia, albeit with some decent antennas and receivers.
Last night I had my IC 765 right on frequency with decent propagation, however another station with a difficult to copy signal was broadcasting Gospel with Southern American accents. Does global broadcast Gospel at times?
  regards Ross VK2NZA
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K0OD
Member

Posts: 3030




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« Reply #43 on: December 06, 2014, 12:30:10 PM »

Quote
Does global broadcast Gospel at times?

Don't think so. No religion at all during the many hour I've listened. 
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W4OP
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Posts: 841


WWW

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« Reply #44 on: December 07, 2014, 01:31:30 PM »

I am disappointed in that I sent in a reception QSL card (via  USPS) the very first night they  were on the air- never received their QSL.

Dale W4OP
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